united states – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 11:19:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png united states – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Expelling the “Putin generation” from Western universities will not help https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/expelling-the-putin-generation-from-western-universities-will-not-help/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 06:00:23 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/expelling-the-putin-generation-from-western-universities-will-not-help/ The criminal decision to attack Ukraine will cost everyone in Russia, but not as much as the Ukrainians. Among the Russians who will suffer the most are members of the country’s most globalized and open generation: the “Putin generation”, people born just before he became prime minister in 1999 or soon after. These people only […]]]>

The criminal decision to attack Ukraine will cost everyone in Russia, but not as much as the Ukrainians. Among the Russians who will suffer the most are members of the country’s most globalized and open generation: the “Putin generation”, people born just before he became prime minister in 1999 or soon after. These people only knew Putin as the leader of Russia, and now they will see him take away their future and their aspirations.

This generation is suddenly stuck in the middle of the backlash of Putin’s invasion. The University of Tartu, Estonia is restricting applications from Russia and Belarus due to sanctions. Some US officials are pushing to do the same in the United States, with Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-California) suggesting “kick all Russian students out of the United States” in response to the war.

That would be counterproductive – give Putin a propaganda victory and alienate precisely those people most likely to turn against him. The war has prompted some Westerners to argue that all Russians are responsible for Putin’s war, that we are all guilty. Even if that’s true, the younger generation is the least complicit. And cutting Russia’s future ties with the West in the name of punishing Putin will only make existing problems worse.

These are the people who are detained at anti-war rallies across Russia and then expelled from their universities for protesting the invasion. This is the generation that saw popular leader Alexei Navalny arrested a year ago, and who now has to live with a potential 15-year prison sentence for spreading “fake news” about Russia’s war. And ultimately, it is the generation that will have to rebuild the country once this regime is gone and Russia has a chance to start afresh. But for now, they face an increasingly repressive government that sees enemies in anyone who dares to question Putin’s war of aggression. This digital-born generation is the least prone to propaganda (they don’t usually watch TV for their news) and are therefore a major source of concern for Russian authorities in times of war and economic hardship.

Students who have been protesting in Saint Petersburg or have been detained in Novosibirsk for the past few days have not been given the opportunity to pack their bags and leave for Armenia or Turkey, as some other Russians have done – they will have to persevere through Russia’s worst years. since the fall of the Soviet Union. The regime will certainly try to break their spirit, arrest the most active and ambitious, and keep the rest in line with fear.

One way to complicate Putin’s task is to deny him the chance to convince young Russians that there is no hope and that they are alone. It is in the interest of the West to communicate the idea that a Russia without Putin – a democratic Russia – will be welcomed back into the world community after dealing with the crimes that Putin committed. Russians need a vision in which their nation is not a permanent pariah state.

There is no going back with Putin as president. They know that. We all know that. But can this generation of young Russians hope that once Putin is gone, the West will give them a chance at redemption and offer them a future whose vision can keep them alive today?

Putin’s Russia cannot be defeated by war: it is a nuclear power with the most warheads in the world. The regime can only be changed by a popular protest, a coup or an act of God. There will be no occupying forces like in Germany in 1945 for de-Putinization or external control. If the West wants to defeat Putin, sanctions are not enough: it needs allies within. Russian youth is the most natural ally of all. If they don’t come to terms with the new reality they face — if they keep their protests going and don’t lose heart — they might just be able to keep Putin’s remaining term short.

Ukraine, of course, is now the main priority. It is imperative to provide all available assistance to help Ukraine and Ukrainians survive this war. But Russia will not disappear when the bombing stops. The West should not make it easy for Putin in the name of punishing him.

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Payment Processor That Helped Fake Bilk Discount Clubs Consumers to Pay $2.3M in FTC Case https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/payment-processor-that-helped-fake-bilk-discount-clubs-consumers-to-pay-2-3m-in-ftc-case/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/payment-processor-that-helped-fake-bilk-discount-clubs-consumers-to-pay-2-3m-in-ftc-case/ A payment processor that allegedly helped a bogus discount club scheme debit tens of millions of dollars from consumers without authorization will have to pay $2.3 million and face a permanent ban from working with high-end customers. risk following a Federal Trade Commission lawsuit. According to the FTC’s complaint in the case, which was first […]]]>

A payment processor that allegedly helped a bogus discount club scheme debit tens of millions of dollars from consumers without authorization will have to pay $2.3 million and face a permanent ban from working with high-end customers. risk following a Federal Trade Commission lawsuit.

According to the FTC’s complaint in the case, which was first filed in 2017, iStream Financial Services and its senior executives, Kris Axberg and Richard Joachim, allegedly debited money from consumers seeking loans on salary or cash advances but were signed up for a bogus coupon service and charged upfront fees up to almost $100 plus up to $19.95 per month. Consumers were enrolled in the discount club program online and through outbound telemarketing.

The complaint alleged that 99.5% of consumers illegally charged for “discount clubs” never accessed any coupons, and that tens of thousands of them called the defendants to try to reverse the charges, while that thousands more disputed the fees directly with their banks.

“The order announced today prohibits iStream from processing high-risk payments and orders it to pay $2.3 million that can be used to reimburse defrauded consumers,” said Samuel Levine, director of the Bureau of FTC Consumer Protection. the amount represents a small fraction of the approximately $40 million in total losses suffered by consumers — a direct result of the Supreme Court’s decision in AMG. Without a legal solution to restore the FTC’s strongest authority to obtain refunds, these consumers, and millions more like them, cannot be cured. »

Payment processors, like iStream, offer merchants the ability to obtain customer payments for products and services through electronic banking. According to the complaint, iStream, in conjunction with merchants, used a type of payment called a remotely created check (RCC) to withdraw money from consumer accounts, causing significant harm to hundreds of thousands of consumers, often those who could least afford to have funds unexpectedly taken from their accounts without authorization.

iStream, which processed all payments for the discount club from November 2010 to April 2016, consistently ignored the high return rates generated by discount club transactions, a red flag indicating illegal debit. According to the FTC’s complaint, iStream also ignored other indications of fraudulent activity, including that the primary merchant client involved in the scheme from 2010 through September 2013 was EDebitPay, LLC, a company that had previously subject of previous enforcement actions by the FTC for engaging in very similar misconduct.

Under the proposed settlement order, defendants will be permanently prohibited from using any form of remotely created payment orders, including RCCs, as well as from processing payments on behalf of any customer whose activity involves outbound telemarketing, discount clubs or offers to help consumers. with payday loans. The order will also prohibit the defendants from providing payment services to any customer that the defendants know or should know violates the FTC Act or the Telemarketing Sales Rule (TSR).

The order will require defendants to conduct a thorough screening of all of their existing customers as well as all future customers to ensure that customers do not violate FTC or TSR law.

The FTC’s case against the other defendants in the case, including the merchants operating the discount club system, is ongoing.

The Commission’s vote approving the stipulated final order was 4-0. The FTC filed the draft order in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia.

REMARK: The stipulated final orders have the force of law when approved and signed by the judge of the district court.

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Leveraging Technology to Improve Financial Inclusion in the United States https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/leveraging-technology-to-improve-financial-inclusion-in-the-united-states/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 20:59:44 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/leveraging-technology-to-improve-financial-inclusion-in-the-united-states/ By Ismail Amla, Executive Vice President, Professional Services, NCR Corporation The benefits of financial inclusion are known and numerous. Households that lack access to bank accounts or relatively affordable mechanisms for receiving, paying, and spending money end up spending a significantly higher percentage of their income on cash-intensive financial options. These options, like money orders […]]]>

By Ismail Amla, Executive Vice President, Professional Services, NCR Corporation

The benefits of financial inclusion are known and numerous. Households that lack access to bank accounts or relatively affordable mechanisms for receiving, paying, and spending money end up spending a significantly higher percentage of their income on cash-intensive financial options. These options, like money orders and payday loans, tend to have much higher fees and usurious interest rates. Households suffering from financial exclusion are disproportionately poor and less educated. The highest percentages of these excluded households are found in the least affluent countries. But even in the United States, according to the latest FDIC surveys, 5.4% of households were unbanked. This group represents 7.1 million households. The exclusion of people from the financial system also hinders economic growth; money that could have been spent on goods, services, and education is instead trapped in the cash economy or used to pay punitive fees and interest.

I believe the world is at a signing moment. Just as economic growth has dramatically reduced poverty rates around the world, ubiquitous, cheap, and connected technology can dramatically reduce rates of financial exclusion. It is now up to companies like NCR and the entire fintech ecosystem to work collectively to make this happen. Together, we believe we can dramatically reduce financial exclusion over the next five years in the developed world and over the next decade in the developing world.

Promoting greater access to technology, greater openness of the financial system, and a more robust and fairer market for financial products will enable us to achieve this goal. Combined, these three force factors are already at the origin of a rapid fintech revolution. This revolution is both a moral imperative to improve lives and a one-of-a-kind business opportunity that will benefit society by increasing overall economic growth.

Although the digital divide still exists, technological advances and cost reduction are rapidly avoiding this divide. According to Our World in Data, 640,000 new people come online every day. Smartphones and access to cheap or free data are the essential instrument of progress. Today, low-end smartphones cost less than $100, and forward-thinking carriers, such as India’s Jio, are offering low-cost wireless data plans. While smartphone data plans vary widely from country to country and are often expensive, Wi-Fi access is much cheaper and often free. If these trends continue, the number of people without Internet access will continue to decline.

A whole generation of new banks, such as Chime and Monzo, have built businesses entirely based on mobile phone apps. In China, for example, where digital payments are now the dominant form of exchange, the phone has become the main gateway to financial services. In developed countries, fewer people are using cash and employers are rapidly moving away from paper check payments. COVID has further accelerated the transition from cash to digital payments.

Traditionally, the unbanked and underbanked use digital financial services at a much lower rate than higher demographic households. But we have clear evidence that digital financial inclusion can work in less developed economies. In Africa, more than 200 million people use mobile electronic payment systems. In Kenya, M-Pesa mobile payment systems are almost universally adopted. With smart product designs, we can change that. The M-Pesa system was designed with local culture and values ​​in mind.

The enormous pressure that emerging fintech is placing on traditional banking processes is driving a welcome unbundling of financial services and multi-tiered competition. Venmo, for example, offers to give customers who set up direct deposit instant access to paychecks. Traditionally, banks have taken a day or two to process these deposits. For the poor and financially excluded, two days can mean the difference between paying rent on time and incurring a penalty. Unbanked users who wish to transfer money across borders for relatively small sums, as is often the case with remittances, can now choose from several options, including cryptocurrencies. Zelle, which is managed and owned by a consortium of major US banks, allows users with accounts to instantly transfer money at no cost.

While the winds of tech trends may be at our backs and the rapid rise of fintech may provide the impetus to rethink financial services, there are still a number of concrete steps that the financial services industry should consider. .

  • Remove common obstacles. Minimum fee balances or service charges drive away low-income consumers. In fact, according to the World Bank, the number one reason unbanked people don’t have an account is simply because they don’t have enough money. Clearly, this is something that is doable. CapitalOne, a major US bank, has just announced that it is waiving overdraft fees while continuing to offer overdraft protection.
  • Encourage mobile banking. According to the World Bank, low-income consumers tend to have a mobile connection rather than home Internet access. Designing banking products and mobile financial services that appeal to the unbanked will reduce exclusion. It is also a good universal product design. There’s a very good reason why the dominant financial platform in most parts of the world that are mostly unbanked or only recently banked is the smartphone.
  • Expand access points to advanced digital services. There’s a good reason why convenience stores, supermarkets, and other stores all have ATMs. Indeed, ATMs attract customers and make it easier for them to pay. In the digital economy, these same access points can take on equally important significance for stores as centers for the digital delivery of financial services, which could even be co-branded between banks and stores. Physical real estate combined with smart digital hotspots brings services closer to those in the community who might not walk to a bank branch alone – and who otherwise would not have easy access.
  • Choose prepaid products. In 2017, nearly 27% of unbanked U.S. households used prepaid cards according to a FDIC Household Survey. Prepaid credit cards or debit cards can offer a descent path to credit history that can unlock other key doors. These cards are safer than cash or checks and can be used for online purchases.
  • Find new ways to analyze customers and give them access. In the United States, several companies are using artificial intelligence to create alternative and more accurate credit scoring systems. Created by former Google executives, Upstart looks at over 1,000 additional metrics to assess whether someone is likely to repay their loan. Upstart is actually more accurate than older credit scoring products and is particularly good at identifying people who might not get credit through traditional underwriting processes, but are actually very good risks. Similar systems can operate at lower levels of funding and loans, where unbanked people can operate.

To effect these kinds of changes, we will all have to put ourselves in the shoes of those watching from the outside, trying to imagine what it might be like to live a life of financial exclusion. It is now. The technology is there. The opportunity is enormous. Let’s make a big dent in financial exclusion, not in our lifetime, but in the next decade – or even sooner.

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Fiction reviews for older kids – magic and morality, beyond Marvel | Books for children: 8-12 years old https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fiction-reviews-for-older-kids-magic-and-morality-beyond-marvel-books-for-children-8-12-years-old/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fiction-reviews-for-older-kids-magic-and-morality-beyond-marvel-books-for-children-8-12-years-old/ Jhe Marvel takeover of childhood often feels all-encompassing. Truly, however, Stan Lee’s stable has long embellished Norse and African mythos. Some new riff books on those riffs – parents might just sell them to a reluctant bookworm about their Marvel parallels. Writer-illustrator Louis StowellIt’s awesome Loki: An Evil God’s Guide to Being Good (Walker Books, […]]]>


Jhe Marvel takeover of childhood often feels all-encompassing. Truly, however, Stan Lee’s stable has long embellished Norse and African mythos. Some new riff books on those riffs – parents might just sell them to a reluctant bookworm about their Marvel parallels.

Writer-illustrator Louis StowellIt’s awesome Loki: An Evil God’s Guide to Being Good (Walker Books, £7.99) imagines the Norse god portrayed in Tom Hiddleston’s Marvel films as a mischievous and petulant 11-year-old, banished to naughty Earth to atone for his misdeeds. Often laugh out loud, it’s an irreverent play through practical moral philosophy, like Netflix’s The Good Place with more sarcastic cartoon snakes. A talking diary chats with Loki throughout.

Next: Wakanda, setting of the Marvel movie Black Panther. Initially based in the American suburbs, Jamar J Perryit’s Cameron Battle and the Hidden Realms (Bloomsbury, £6.99) is an assured start featuring three friends who discover an ancient and powerful book.

Filled with lore, it’s also a portal to Chidani, a supernatural Igbo kingdom where, unbeknownst to young Cameron, the Battle family have been tasked with providing stability between the worlds and maintaining the broken Igbo heritage. by slavery. The fight has already cost his parents their lives. Along with his friends Zion and Aliyah, Cameron learns magical warrior moves and becomes entangled in a divine power struggle. Captivating and fast-paced, it’s also a novel that highlights acceptance and homosexuality through the emotional tenderness between preteens.

Multiverse? Ross Welfordalways excellent, own one. In youthe side world (HarperCollins, £6.99) features 12-year-old Willa, whose parents run a run-down campsite, and new friend Manny, an impulsive foster child recently arrived at school. War is imminent. As they track down an unknown creature in a sea cave during a full moon, they wake up in another version of their own lives, but somewhere else – Willa is Mina, her sister is a brother, her parents aren’t fighting. The war is over, the climatic catastrophe averted. Can they come back? Do they want to to come back?

“Old-fashioned pleasure”: Jummy at the river school by Sabine Adeyinka. Photography: Chicken House Books

There are also new iterations of other solid formulas. Sabine Adeyinka gives an exciting twist to the boarding school romance: Jummy at the river school (Chicken House, £6.99) is set in 1990s Nigeria. Scatty Jumoke yearns to attend a prestigious boarding school; she gets the grades, but has to leave behind her smart but economically disadvantaged friend Caro. Adeyinka’s early days are full of old-fashioned fun: late-night feasts and sporting escapades, plus crocodiles, minus cell phones. But justice is at the heart of this book. When Caro shows up, it’s to work as a maid for the haughty matron. It takes courage and creativity for Jummy to solve problems, and this book will have children salivating for Nigerian snacks such as puff puff and cheers.

Hannah Goldthe author of the first best-selling children’s hardback book of 2021, the last bear, is back with another lyrical soap opera about the solidarity between humans and animals. Get out of the bear, get in The lost whale (HarperCollins, £12.99), illustrated once again by the great Levi Pinfold.

By somehow repeating himself, Gold actually remains original – young Londoner Rio is banished to stay with a grandmother he barely knows in California when his mother is taken into care for mental health intervention. Scared, angry, Rio feels guilty for having (he thinks) let his mother down. Gold is fantastic about the angst of young carers – and the magnificence of large cetaceans, whose presence Rio can sense before anyone else, making it very useful on whale-watching excursions. But the whale he knows best, White Beak, seems to be crying out for help: what can he do?

Kelly Yang, author of
Kelly Yang, author of the “sensational” New from Here. Photo: Jae C Hong/AP

Finally a story that is just beginning to be told. american author Kelly Yang is better known for YA, but New from here (Simon & Schuster, £7.99) is a sensational mid-level book about a family disrupted, then healed, by the pandemic.

Knox Wei-Evans and his family are Asian Americans living in Hong Kong when a new virus is discovered in Wuhan. It will pass, says his dad, who has masks somewhere, some Sars. Soon, however, the three siblings and their mother are sent back to the United States to get by, bumpy – exactly what happened to Yang and his brood. The virus follows.

It’s a warm, sensitive, and deep family story, full of childish logic (garage sales discouraged, secret LinkedIn profiles), bitter sibling rivalry, Knox’s ADHD-born intensity, and… imperative to stand up to racism. Is essential reading to process what we have all been through.

  • To order one of these books at a special price and support the Guardian and Observerclick on the titles or go to guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply

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Editorial Summary: Michigan | Michigan News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/editorial-summary-michigan-michigan-news/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:03:59 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/editorial-summary-michigan-michigan-news/ Iron Mountain Daily News. March 4, 2022. Editorial: Michigan to Salute Service, Donating with Governor’s Awards The Michigan Community Service Commission encourages Michiganders to nominate friends, family and peers who have made a difference for others for the 2022 Governor’s Service Awards. This annual event recognizes contributions made through volunteerism, service and philanthropy. It has […]]]>

Iron Mountain Daily News. March 4, 2022.

Editorial: Michigan to Salute Service, Donating with Governor’s Awards

The Michigan Community Service Commission encourages Michiganders to nominate friends, family and peers who have made a difference for others for the 2022 Governor’s Service Awards.

This annual event recognizes contributions made through volunteerism, service and philanthropy. It has been hosted by the Governor of Michigan for nearly 30 years to recognize the commitment of Michigan residents, organizations and businesses to improving the lives of people and communities.

political cartoons

Several nomination categories are available for volunteer and philanthropic efforts that have taken place over the past year, including honors for youth, mentors and older adults.

Organizations will be recognized for their civic engagement and businesses for maximizing the collective impact of employee volunteerism and corporate social responsibility programs.

Special awards will also be given for lifetime service and giving achievements.

Applications must be submitted by April 30. Nomination instructions are available at https://www.research.net/r/2022MIServiceAwards.

A hard copy of a nomination form is also available upon request. Contact the Michigan Community Service Commission at 517-335-4295 or gsa@michigan.gov.

“Michigan has a long tradition of serving and helping others,” said Ginna Holmes, executive director of MCSC. “The Governor’s Service Awards are a great opportunity for us to come together and celebrate those who have truly made a difference.

The nomination should tell the story of why the nominee deserves to be honored as one of Michigan’s outstanding individuals or organizations committed to making a difference. When creating the application, it is important to provide as much relevant information about the candidate as possible.

Self-nominations for individual categories are not permitted, but may be made for organization awards.

“I want to encourage every Michigander to consider nominating someone for the 2022 Governor’s Service Awards,” Governor Gretchen Whitmer said. “Although the past few years have been difficult, many Michiganians have responded with the courage and determination that define our state. Michiganders from all corners of our state have stepped up and worked hard to support their communities and help their neighbors.

During the pandemic, MCSC is mobilizing more than $21 million in federal funds for local communities for volunteer programs and activities. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/volunteer.

Traverse City Record-Eagle. March 2, 2022.

Editorial: Supporting the Study of Indigenous-Run Residential Schools

The harrowing discovery last year of hundreds of unmarked graves at several Indian residential school sites in Canada has rightly set the wheels in motion – wheels already rusty from neglect.

Immediately after, promises to do better were made by governments, especially in states with their own government-sanctioned boarding school horrors.

Michigan is home to three such sites: the Mount Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School; the Holy Childhood boarding school in Harbor Springs; and the Holy Name of Jesus Indian Mission in Baraga.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s proposed budget for 2023 echoes that promise with a one-time $500,000 appropriation to study “the number of children who have been abused, died or disappeared in these schools, and the long-term impacts term about these children and families. of children forced to attend these schools” and submit a report a year later. This goes hand in hand with federal efforts led by Deb Haaland, our nation’s first Native American cabinet member.

The problem is that in Michigan, several tribal leaders were not involved in these early stages, in the request, in defining its parameters or do not know what roles Michigan’s 12 federally recognized sovereign nations will have. in the process.

So while attention and budgeting are welcome, the state must watch for blind spots to ensure that the course is set – and not by well-meaning bureaucrats – by our Indigenous communities. The role of the state should be one of support, while providing the same concentrated force to open up church record keeping as it has done in the past to address clergy sex abuse. .

The study and resulting report will no doubt uncover some uncomfortable truths.

More than 7,000 other unmarked graves have been discovered at several Indian school sites in the United States and Canada. Beyond the horrific scale of these deaths is the quieter destruction of families, culture and language that still marks communities today – the legacy of these schools.

But we cannot move forward without a clear look behind us – a look without bureaucratic blind spots. Support Anishinaabek leadership by leading the way in our state’s drive to uncover what happened, why it happened, and how its impacts ripple through time and generations.

Escanaba Daily Press. March 7, 2022.

Editorial: March is Michigan Food and Agriculture Month

Governor Gretchen Whitmer proclaimed March Michigan Food and Agriculture Month, to honor and celebrate Michigan farmers, the diversity of produce grown and processed in our state, and the partnerships that keep our food industry thriving. and agricultural.

“Michigan’s food industry is a national powerhouse. We have generated 805,000 jobs and more than $104 billion for our state’s economy each year, making things happen every day,” Governor Whitmer said. “Food and agriculture innovators and entrepreneurs continue to choose Michigan to grow and establish their businesses. They provide new business and career opportunities for Michigan residents, making food and agriculture the cornerstone of Michigan’s continued reinvention. In March, we recognize every person and business that helps make Michigan’s food and agriculture industry what it is today.

Throughout Michigan Food and Agriculture Month, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) will be partnering and presenting various events with the University of State of Michigan commodity organizations, Michigan McDonald’s, the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity and others to highlight different facets of the state’s food and agriculture sector and provide opportunities to learn more about how the food and agriculture industry impacts and improves the lives of Michigan residents.

“One of the best parts of my job is traveling around the state to meet the people who make Michigan’s agribusiness industry strong, prosperous and successful, and I look forward to continuing those visits in March. “said Gary McDowell, Director of MDARD. “Throughout March, you will see posts on our social media channels featuring Michigan cultures, food and agriculture businesses, and MDARD employees who help support and grow our industry. We’ll also highlight nutrition tips to celebrate National Nutrition Month, share information about National Weights and Measures Week, feature children’s books on food and farming for March is Reading Month and provide safety information to our farmers, businesses and constituents during Weather Preparedness Week. .”

Throughout the month: Agriculture and Natural Resources Week at Michigan State University, featuring virtual learning opportunities, events and activities for farmers and others interested in Michigan’s agriculture and natural resources.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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San Carlos resident’s book wins multiple accolades https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/san-carlos-residents-book-wins-multiple-accolades/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 00:26:55 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/san-carlos-residents-book-wins-multiple-accolades/ For San Carlos resident Nancy Regas, advising students over the years has proven to be a very rewarding and successful experience. Regas has lived in the community for 44 years and worked at Patrick Henry High School for nearly 20 years as a counsellor. Retiring in 2016, Regas then worked for three years as a […]]]>

For San Carlos resident Nancy Regas, advising students over the years has proven to be a very rewarding and successful experience.

Regas has lived in the community for 44 years and worked at Patrick Henry High School for nearly 20 years as a counsellor.

Retiring in 2016, Regas then worked for three years as a regional representative for Albion College, a private liberal arts college in Michigan.

Regas’ passion for consulting has not gone away despite his transition into retirement.

In 2021, Regas wrote and self-published, The art of being a school counselor; it’s on Amazon, Kindle, Barnes & Noble. She also recorded it, along with the audiobook on audible.com.

He recently received several distinctions: finalist of the National Indie Excellence Awards; San Francisco Book Festival – Honorable Mention, General Non-Fiction Category; NYC Big Book Award-Winner Education Category; NYC Big Book Award – Distinguished Favorite [audiobook] Non-fiction category; 56th Annual Local Authors Program for the San Diego Public Library [was in the showcase through the end of February and then was to be available for check out].

Regas believes the book has merit, especially given the challenges facing students and those who teach, counsel and raise them these days.

Times are very difficult in education and all educators (counselors, administrators, teachers) and parents need inspiration,” said Regas.

Writing the book became an inspiration to Regas, especially as she says she arrived at her true calling as a school counselor.

All career paths before that (unbeknownst to me at the time) were stepping stones to where I belonged,” Regas remarked. “Every day I went to work with anticipation, wonder and joy. I wanted to recapture some of those feelings and memories in words, leaving my legacy to my daughters and granddaughters as well as a tribute to all of my students.

For Regas, the individual relationships with his students over the years stand out.

It was such a privilege to watch them grow, hear their stories, cheer for their victories and ease their pain through their disappointments,” Regas continued. “I was their advocate, their signpost, their sounding board, their safety net, and their reality check. I still have relationships with many of my former students (now amazing adults), and that’s for my greatest pleasure and honor. No two days were the same (so it was never boring); each day was like unpacking a package full of discoveries that included challenges, obstacles, triumphs, achievements and resolutions.

With all the challenges faced by students, teachers and parents elsewhere in recent years, a strong counseling program in school is essential.

In my mind, counseling has always been vital,” Regas said. “More than half of the states in the United States do not require school counselors for K-12 students (including, unfortunately, California). This means that if the manager does not like advisors, they are not a priority; if the budget needs to be reduced, the advisers are considered useless. This harsh reality is simply wrong in my belief. Counselors are essential to the success and well-being of students throughout their education. Given the turmoil of the past two years, the need for counselors in schools should be pretty obvious.

According to Regas, students should have a safe space at school, as should parents and teachers.

I had an open door policy for anyone (not just my advisers) who was looking for ‘a zone of truth’,” Regas said. “In the book, I wrote a chapter on COVID and its impact on education. Also, I swore to myself to be the school counselor I never had.

For anyone looking to become a school counselor, Regas has some advice.

Find your passion,” Regas emphasized. “Know why you want to be a school counselor and do your best. In writing the book, I wanted to not only share my story, but inspire others to find their passion and not just a job. I wish all educators[counselorsteachersandadministratorstobemoreseemoredomorefeelmoregivemoreandthusbefulfilledmoreastheytouchthelivesoftheirstudentsbeingTomethatistheofthehearttobemoreseemoredomorefeelmoreandthusbefulfilledmoreastheytouchthelivesoftheirstudentsbeingTomethatistheo[conseillersenseignantsetadministrateursd’êtreplusdevoirplusdefaireplusderessentirplusdedonnerplusetdoncd’êtreplusépanouislorsqu’ilstouchentlaviedeleursélèvesPourmoic’estlecœurd’êtreunconseillerunéducateur[counselorsteachersandadministratorstobemoreseemoredomorefeelmoregivemoreandthusbefulfilledmoreastheytouchthelivesoftheirstudentsTomethatistheheartofbeingacounseloraneducator”

When asked if she plans to write any additional books, Regas replied that she doesn’t know at this point.

When I was a perinatal educator and I heard parents say, I can’t wait for him/her to sit down, stand up, walk, talk, etc. the joy and miracle that was right before them. My thought has always been to savor and appreciate the current stage, thus remaining in the here and now. I want that for this book. I want this book to fulfill its purpose and to see it reach its audience and make a difference. I think it would be very beneficial in graduate programs as well as integrating new counselors, administrators, and teachers into a district. Theory alone does not put the soul into being a counselor, an educator,” Regas noted.

For Nancy Regas, many students and others have benefited from the words she has spoken over the years.

(Photo courtesy SD Public Library Local Author’s Program)

– Reach editor Dave Thomas: dave@sdnews.com.

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English learners at university: from marginalized to invisible https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/english-learners-at-university-from-marginalized-to-invisible/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 19:15:15 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/english-learners-at-university-from-marginalized-to-invisible/ Students learning English often face extreme obstacles in obtaining an education in the United States. From kindergarten to grade 12, they are entitled to the resources needed to get the same education as their English-speaking peers, but what they receive varies greatly depending on where they live. As a result, about 67% of English learners […]]]>

Students learning English often face extreme obstacles in obtaining an education in the United States.

From kindergarten to grade 12, they are entitled to the resources needed to get the same education as their English-speaking peers, but what they receive varies greatly depending on where they live. As a result, about 67% of English learners graduate from high school, compared to about 84% of the general population.

For those who make it out of high school, the path to college — and what happens to them there — is largely uncharted and unregulated. In the worst-case scenario, without support and guidance to navigate the system, English learners end up wasting time and losing their eligibility for financial aid by taking remedial classes, when they could be succeeding in classes ordinary with language support.

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Rockies Al Gilbert loves baseball and practices law https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rockies-al-gilbert-loves-baseball-and-practices-law/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 22:05:05 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rockies-al-gilbert-loves-baseball-and-practices-law/ DENVER — Director of baseball operations for the New Rockies, Al Gilbert loves practicing law and he does it very well. Gilbert’s competence in the legal arena is evidenced by his internship and fellowship stints with the United States Department of Justice—writing speeches for Tom Perez, then Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights; help prosecute […]]]>

DENVER — Director of baseball operations for the New Rockies, Al Gilbert loves practicing law and he does it very well.

Gilbert’s competence in the legal arena is evidenced by his internship and fellowship stints with the United States Department of Justice—writing speeches for Tom Perez, then Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights; help prosecute hate crimes; researches and writes memos on sentencing issues relating to white collar crimes and violent offences; and analyzing court-supervised settlement conferences to resolve criminal cases. Originally from Oakland, Calif., Gilbert returned to the Bay Area to work as an associate at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP and later as an assistant district attorney for San Francisco.

But as an ADA with an 80 caseload in his work year, through seven trials, “mostly DUI and gun possession,” and through all the legal processes he found enjoyable , there was always time for baseball.

“Baseball never left,” said Gilbert, whose role in the Rockies’ revamped front office will include being a voice this offseason making creative moves to build the club, as well as managing the list during the season. “Even in law school, I was doing a sports law clinic and was the editor of the sports and entertainment journal. So I’ve always been interested in sports.

“Still, I was watching baseball. After the day at the law firm, I checked out business rumors and what was going on with the deals. I always had my opinion on what guys should be paid.

Albert Gilbert IV, 32, grew up in the Oakland area looking up to Giants slugger Barry Bonds. But his favorite player on his favorite team was shortstop Miguel Tejada with the Athletics. Organic singing fans like him sang from the bleachers, “Da-da-da, dadadat-da, Tejada!” still ringing in his ears.

Gilbert had played youth ball at Oakland with some distinction, including playing for the Oakland All-Stars at the Cal Ripken 12-U World Series in Vincennes, Ind.

While in high school at St. Paul’s School, a boarding school in Concord, NH, he was an intermediate outfielder and team captain. He prepared for law by earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in sociology from Stanford University and attending Harvard Law School.

Gilbert’s arm strength level dictated a high school switch from shortstop to second baseman, but he was good enough to consider playing at Cornell University. The influence of his parents, however, caused him to focus solely on Stanford academics.

“My mother [Erin Gilbert] has his MBA from USC and his JD from Columbia Law School, and my dad [Albert III] has his MBA from Indiana,” Gilbert said. “Some kind of graduate degree was the expectation. When I was in college, it was clear to me that I was in the best position to take the legal route. I had strengths in reading and writing.

“Yes, law school, the classic saying goes, it teaches you to think like a lawyer. There are benefits to trying to think logically, whatever that means.

When Gilbert left the legal field to be part of the inaugural class of the MLB Diversity Scholarship Program in 2018 — after his mother heard about the program on a radio show and encouraged him to apply — he had never met a front office manager. He then worked for the Dodgers as the baseball contracts and finance coordinator for the 2018-21 seasons before joining the Rockies.

Gilbert’s credentials intrigued Tyrone Brooks, MLB’s senior director of the Front Office and Field Staff Diversity Pipeline Program, when the diversity scholarship program began.

“We were excited for him to work in baseball, and the Dodgers hired him and that opened the door for him to start working in the game,” Brooks said. “With his legal background, he learned the rules and different aspects of baseball operations while playing a role in many of their contracts. Now, to go to the Rockies, he’s actually the first member of our diversity scholarship program to become a director of an organization.

Gilbert was part of a stellar initial class.

Brittany Haby, who the Rockies promoted this offseason to head of baseball research after two scholarships with the club, was also a member of that 2018 class. This winter, the Rockies also brought in Julianna Rubin as a a baseball operations fellow, to continue the program’s influence with the club, and Emily Glass, formerly the Marlins education coordinator, joined the Rockies as a scouting operations administrator after training in MLB. Diversity Pipeline Scout Development Program.

As passionate as Gilbert is about baseball and applying all of his skills to help a club, he is equally enthusiastic about helping others through his visibility and information. Gilbert said that before looking for a job in the game, he had never met a front office manager – let alone a black person, a person of color or a woman.

“Representation is important,” Gilbert said. “To the extent that I’m that for someone else, I’m happy to be that. I definitely have people reaching out to me every day, whether it’s through LinkedIn or random email. I am interested in speaking to anyone who is interested in learning more about the industry or thinking about this career path.

“There are so many people who want to come in, but it’s worth it. It’s a big industry.

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These are the Best Universities in the World (Career Placement) for 2022 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/these-are-the-best-universities-in-the-world-career-placement-for-2022/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 08:38:10 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/these-are-the-best-universities-in-the-world-career-placement-for-2022/ We all want to have a flourishing career, right? And for this, one of the viable options is to enroll in one of the best universities in the world. It is true that going to a good college or university simply does not only mean improving your career. In fact, if you choose a very […]]]>

We all want to have a flourishing career, right? And for this, one of the viable options is to enroll in one of the best universities in the world. It is true that going to a good college or university simply does not only mean improving your career. In fact, if you choose a very good university, your chances of obtaining a degree also increase. According to the survey conducted recently, there are a handful of universities that have definitely raised the bar when it comes to employability rankings. In this blog below, we have named top race contenders who are the best for student placement opportunities.

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    The first name to appear on the list of best universities for job placement is none other than Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Touted as one of the best universities in the world, the school of education offers career-enhancing courses and programs for undergraduates, as well as the general public and industry leaders. Another key point that sets the institute apart from the rest is that MIT alumni and faculty members play a key role in fostering entrepreneurial innovations. With many large conglomerates actively participating in courses and discipline, it’s no surprise that MIT holds a 100% placement record.

  2. University of Cambridge
    One of the elite institutes in the world, the University of Cambridge secures a second place on our list. With a glorious history dating back to the 13th century, the university was founded by scholars from Oxford. With career enhancement courses, a variety of disciplines, and top-notch programs, the school of knowledge produces some of the sought-after candidates. All of these and more have helped Cambridge achieve university status with a hundred percent placement record.

  3. The University of Melbourne
    Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is one of the top universities in Australia and the world. The public-spirited institution has a distinctive contribution to society that makes it better in all spheres of education. Starting from research, engagement, learning and teaching, the university helps students embark on an unparalleled professional journey. With research facilities focused on the main challenges facing the world today, candidates also have the opportunity to think about solutions in a socio-economic way.

  4. Harvard University
    Harvard University is one of the oldest and arguably one of the most prestigious universities. The college has consistently maintained a reputation for enrolling highly intelligent students. With a history of groundbreaking research and innovation, the school is favored by many companies around the world. Students also get involved in the many extracurricular activities from sports and entrepreneurial innovations that help them in their future projects. The university is dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching and research in many disciplines that help make a difference on a global scale. With more than 360,000 alumni worldwide, Harvard graduates are constantly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge.

  5. University of California, Los Angeles
    The University of California has been one of the pioneer institutes for over 100 years. UCLA’s primary goal is to create the dissemination and application of knowledge for the betterment of our global society. Another striking aspect of the school of education is that it is deeply rooted in the mission of education and public service. Loaded with creative opportunities, accomplishments, critical inquiries, candidates leaving the institute have the best options to advance their careers. All these facilities have enabled the institute to achieve a one hundred percent placement record in the world.

  6. Tsinghua University
    One of the most prestigious institutes in the People’s Republic of China, Tsinghua University caters to the three cores of education, namely research, innovation, and teaching. Located in the northwest suburbs of Beijing, the institute exhibits the correct fusion of Chinese and Western cultures backed by the rich history that has always set it apart from others. At present, the university has around 20 schools and 59 departments under its wing with a multidisciplinary approach to the curriculum. With a focus on innovative solutions, the School of Education is committed to developing global citizens who can move forward in their careers.

Did you read?

# Best CEOs in the world in 2022.
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# World Passport Ranking, 2022.
# The richest people in the world (Top 100 billionaires, 2022).
# Jamie Dimon: the most powerful banker in the world.


Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: info@ceoworld.biz

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Collegiate’s new Dutch mascot is a flashpoint in the race debate https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/collegiates-new-dutch-mascot-is-a-flashpoint-in-the-race-debate/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 20:27:09 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/collegiates-new-dutch-mascot-is-a-flashpoint-in-the-race-debate/ The national judgment on race and privilege that has caused upheaval in schools across the country came at Collegiate, one of New York’s most prestigious private schools, when a group of students of color publicly demanded that the 400-year-old institution “address its own problems of racism and intolerance. In response, Collegiate officials created a 17-member […]]]>

The national judgment on race and privilege that has caused upheaval in schools across the country came at Collegiate, one of New York’s most prestigious private schools, when a group of students of color publicly demanded that the 400-year-old institution “address its own problems of racism and intolerance.

In response, Collegiate officials created a 17-member task force, which a year later produced a comprehensive 407-page report on the school’s “history and symbols,” filled with charts, findings survey and feedback from dozens of people connected to Collegiate.

Then in January, three years after students called for change, the final result of the study arrived in an email to parents and alumni: Collegiate’s mascot had a facelift.

In recent years, schools across the United States, from private schools like Collegiate to public high schools to Ivy League universities, have struggled to adapt to rapidly changing racial norms. and privileges by diversifying faculties, expanding curricula and adopting anti-racist guidelines.

Many of New York’s exclusive Collegiate private school counterparts, who are fiercely protective of their privacy, have faced their own controversies. At Brearley, Chapin and Spence, among others, disturbing testimonies from students of color have been compiled on dedicated social media pages. At Grace Church School and Dalton, anti-racist training led to minor uprisings and angry letters.

At Collegiate, it was the school’s mascot – a winking caricature of a crow’s-foot Dutch settler – who appeared as a flashpoint. The decision to change it has, predictably, caused some outcry, but on both sides.

Some people lamented that what they saw as an important part of Collegiate’s heritage was being erased. They viewed the Dutch mascot as a harmless embodiment of school pride and a loving connection to the tradition of the all-boys institution on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

Others backed the initial call to change the mascot, seen by some as offensive, from its Eurocentric and racist connotations to its crude depiction of a disability, a peg leg. But they saw the result of the vast research project as a simple transformation that did not confront the broader issues of race and inclusion at Collegiate.

“It does next to nothing to address systemic racism and socio-cultural inequality at Collegiate,” said Luca Rojas, 32, who graduated from the school in 2008.

While redesigning the mascot is laudable, Mr. Rojas said, changing it only “scratched the surface of what really needs to be done to address systemic racism and socio-cultural inequities at Collegiate, which only makes the make it even more hollow and performative.

Others saw merit in the movement. A more recent graduate, Rifat Islam, 20, called the issue of mascots “a difficult balancing act for the school”.

Mr Islam, who graduated from Collegiate in 2019 and is now a junior at Yale, added: ‘It is more important to me that we have engaged in conversation.

The task force report, which is posted on the Collegiate website, also refers to plans to create a second task force devoted to the school’s policies on student admissions and retention, but offers no further details.

Officials at Collegiate, a K-12 school with about 650 students, did not respond to messages seeking comment for this article on changes to the curriculum, faculty or other aspects of the school.

Founded in 1628, Collegiate has a long list of prominent graduates that includes one of America’s Founding Fathers, New York’s first Governor John F. Kennedy Jr. and actor David Duchovny. With tuition and fees of around $60,000 per year, it is consistently ranked among the top private schools in the country. Most graduates go on to study at top-tier colleges.

A main objection to the mascot was that it was known to many as “Peg Leg Pete” and widely seen as representing Peter Stuyvesant, the 17th century Dutch wooden-legged leader of New Amsterdam whose legacy has has come under increasing criticism due to its property. of slaves, support for slavery and anti-Semitic policies.

The Stuyvesant name is still used by the prestigious public school Stuyvesant High School, where sports teams are known as the Peglegs, and by the sprawling residential complex of Stuyvesant Town on Manhattan’s East Side.

The Collegiate controversy began in February 2019, when the organization for students of color, Jamaa, said in a letter published in the school newspaper that “Collegiate must address its own issues of racism and intolerance.” .

The Jamaa letter, signed by 28 students, called for a more inclusive, less Eurocentric curriculum and for greater diversity among teachers and administrators beyond “cisgender heterosexual white men.”

In 1969, the letter noted, there had been two black students in the class. In 2019, there were also two black students in the class.

“Collegiate is a place where black children have their hair clogged and constantly touched without their permission as if they were animals in a petting zoo,” the letter reads.

Among the nine steps the students asked the school to take was #5: “a serious reassessment of our school’s mascot.” The letter called Stuyvesant a “vehement anti-Semite” who “ruled through hatred and racism.”

“Is this the man we want to represent Collegiate?” asked the letter. “Do his values ​​match ours?

The report calls the Dutch mascot “an ubiquitous reference in school life, synonymous with the school itself”.

The report said the task force – which included students, staff and college administrators – had “embraced an anti-racism mission and sought to engage students and teachers to challenge whiteness, racial privilege and prejudice. “.

A historian hired as part of the effort examined Collegiate’s place in history amid problematic items such as Stuyvesant’s personal legacy and the existence of slavery in early Dutch Manhattan.

The task force interviewed and polled more than 1,600 students, parents, faculty members and alumni about the school’s mascot and other symbols, which it noted “often become an indicator of feelings just below the surface, whether in school or in society, especially when it comes to race and power.

Some of those interviewed were asked to come up with a word or phrase relating to the Dutchman’s nickname and mascot. Responses ranged from positive (“iconic,” “historic,” “ubiquitous”) to negative (“racism,” “anti-Semitism,” “embarrassing”).

Finally, after three years of study and redesign work, a modernized image of Dutch was sent to thousands of parents and alumni last month.

Gone are the aspects that some people had called offensive, including the original character’s wooden leg and even his identity: the new character is shown in silhouette, with his face obscured.

As part of the same revision process, Collegiate dropped other traditions, including references to God in the secular school’s motto and on its official seal.

The report also recommended addressing other offensive parts of Collegiate’s history, including a fight song printed in a 1964 textbook that the task force said was worth “revisiting.” The song salutes Collegiate’s colonial ancestors, “those hardy old Dutchmen” who arrived in America and “announced to the wandering red men, ‘You must get out of the way.'”

Chinmay Deshpande, a 2020 graduate and task force member, said that despite the “undeniably reprehensible” connection to Stuyvesant, there had been considerable resistance to the mascot change. Among those who opposed the move, many former students emailed school officials asking why the issue was being considered.

“If that’s the answer,” said Mr. Deshpande, 19, “then I’m very pessimistic for systemic change at Collegiate.”

Alumni reaction to the mascot change has been mixed.

Some graduates told the task force that they supported the mascot change; others said it would be tantamount to giving in to political correctness. Some have suggested keeping the mascot but using it to educate students about Collegiate’s complicated history.

“I wonder why we spend so much time and effort and money on this?” said an elder in the task force report. “The future excellence of our students is not linked to a sporting symbol, but to how we interact with each other inside and outside the classroom.”

Another graduate, in an apparent investigation into Jamaa’s complaints in 2019, said, “Don’t let a child try to add a paragraph to their college essay destroy over 200 years of tradition.”

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