Universities – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 21:44:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Universities – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Cyber ​​security is becoming a concern for schools and universities https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/cyber-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bsecurity-is-becoming-a-concern-for-schools-and-universities/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/cyber-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bsecurity-is-becoming-a-concern-for-schools-and-universities/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 21:44:52 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/cyber-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bsecurity-is-becoming-a-concern-for-schools-and-universities/ RALEIGH, NC (WNCN) – COVID-19 isn’t the only virus to fear in schools and universities. Cyber ​​attacks planting ransomware viruses into school computer systems are a growing concern. Some security experts estimate that this happens, on average, twice a day. The nonprofit K-12 Security Information Exchange estimates that many schools never publicly report cyberattack incidents, […]]]>

RALEIGH, NC (WNCN) – COVID-19 isn’t the only virus to fear in schools and universities. Cyber ​​attacks planting ransomware viruses into school computer systems are a growing concern. Some security experts estimate that this happens, on average, twice a day.

The nonprofit K-12 Security Information Exchange estimates that many schools never publicly report cyberattack incidents, which means the number of two per day is likely much higher.

The Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack in May garnered a lot of attention, but it was not unique.

“There are hundreds of them happening behind the scenes that go unreported,” said Steve Cobb, One Source cybersecurity expert.

Educational computer systems are a rich target for bad actors, in part because, in many cases, they are so poorly protected.

“Many school education systems do not have a budget line for cybersecurity, so attackers see these opportunities to take advantage and exploit them for their own gain,” Cobb said.

This gain is in cash. Money for ransomware removal – money for material stored in these educational databases like birthdays and social security numbers.

“A lot of times people who may be minors in this education system, or even in a higher education system, don’t understand the world of credit and how valuable this information is to a threat actor,” Cobb said.

For example, it may be years before the parents of a Kindergarten to Grade 12 student realize that their child’s identity has been stolen and used illegally.

Social engineering using phishing scams to trick someone into giving out a password is the primary means by which education systems are violated.

Cobb said it was a good idea for municipalities and schools to train people on how to avoid these phishing attacks. Precautions include:

  • Annual Cyber ​​Threat Training
  • Live fake phishing attempts to reinforce training
  • Using multi-factor authentication

Multi-factor authentication involves going to a website, entering your password, and then sending a code to your phone. Before you can continue, you must put this code into the system.

As educational cyber attacks become more sophisticated, it is also important that school systems, especially at the elementary level, ensure that they have full-time staff dedicated to nothing but cybersecurity.

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Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies Reach Universities by DailyCoin https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/blockchain-and-cryptocurrencies-reach-universities-by-dailycoin/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/blockchain-and-cryptocurrencies-reach-universities-by-dailycoin/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 09:31:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/blockchain-and-cryptocurrencies-reach-universities-by-dailycoin/ Blockchain and cryptocurrencies reach universities The importance of the industry has led dozens of universities to offer academic training in cryptography. The course aims to deepen knowledge about the network and cryptocurrencies, and to meet the growing demand for specialists. Prestigious universities in the United States, Europe and several Latin American countries promote higher level […]]]>

Blockchain and cryptocurrencies reach universities

  • The importance of the industry has led dozens of universities to offer academic training in cryptography.
  • The course aims to deepen knowledge about the network and cryptocurrencies, and to meet the growing demand for specialists.
  • Prestigious universities in the United States, Europe and several Latin American countries promote higher level studies.

Enthusiasm for and other crypto assets continues to grow around the world. So much so that some of the most recognized universities in the world have integrated blockchain and cryptocurrency studies into their academic programs, as indicated in a report prepared by Coinbase (NASDAQ 🙂 Inc, the American crypto trading platform. -cash.

According to the 2019 study, at least a third of the world’s 50 most prestigious universities in the world have included studies on crypto technology and digital currencies.

Cryptographic Studies in Venezuela and Latin America

Recently, a Venezuelan university announced its decision to incorporate a blockchain and cryptocurrency engineering education into its academic options. The institution in question is the Ezequiel Zamora National Experimental University of the Western Plains (UNELLEZ).

The state-dependent study center plans to launch a blockchain and cryptocurrency engineering degree in 2022 at its headquarters in San Carlos, Cojedes state. It is also considering the creation of a digital economy diploma, “with which the population will have wider access to this information with high added value for the future of the economy”.

The rapid expansion of cryptocurrencies in Venezuela, along with the Bitcoin mining farms that have been legalized and the informal jobs that have been created around the digital ecosystem, have served to interest the Venezuelan university in training specialists in space.

Other similar experiences are currently being developed in Chile, Argentina, Peru, Colombia and Mexico. In each of these Latin American countries, at least one higher education institution already has training in blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies.

Venezuela stands out worldwide among the countries where cryptocurrencies are most used, especially Bitcoin, among other digital currencies, not only as a payment instrument but as a digital asset to protect against hyperinflation. and the shortage of dollars and euros.

The bolivar, the national currency, is little used in commercial transactions due to its astonishing historical depreciation. The government of Nicolás Maduro and the Central Bank of Venezuela have removed 14 zeros from the currency over the past 13 years in an attempt to bail out the currency, but attempts have been unsuccessful.

Cornell University tops the global list

The Coinbase report was compiled based on “surveys of 735 U.S. students aged 16 and over, a comprehensive review of courses at 50 international universities, analysis of research citations and out of course offerings, and interviews with professors and students ”.

Cornell University of New York tops Coinbase’s 2019 list of leaders in crypto education. Blockchain courses offered by the university include the University of California-Berkeley, Stanford, MIT, and New York University.

“Cornell offers 14 courses on cryptocurrencies and / or blockchain (compared to 9 in 2018) and its IC3 group [The Initiative for Cryptocurrencies and Contracts] brings together researchers from the best universities in the world, ”notes the university.

In Europe, one of the most important blockchain university education projects is Wool University, led by academics from the University of Oxford. The educational project is entirely based on blockchain technology and promotes itself as the “Uber (NYSE 🙂 for students, Airbnb for academics”.

On the reverse

  • Will crypto education help centralize the industry or decentralize it more?

Why should you care?

Education in cryptocurrency and blockchain opens up an endless field of new formal employment opportunities in the crypto industry and in various economic activities.

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UK academic staff to vote on strike over next academic year | Higher Education https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/uk-academic-staff-to-vote-on-strike-over-next-academic-year-higher-education/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/uk-academic-staff-to-vote-on-strike-over-next-academic-year-higher-education/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 18:18:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/uk-academic-staff-to-vote-on-strike-over-next-academic-year-higher-education/ University staff are set to be called on strike over the next academic year, reigniting their battle with employers over deep cuts to pension benefits just as campuses are recovering from the effects of the disruption. Covid. A special meeting of the higher education branches of the University College Union voted in favor of a […]]]>

University staff are set to be called on strike over the next academic year, reigniting their battle with employers over deep cuts to pension benefits just as campuses are recovering from the effects of the disruption. Covid.

A special meeting of the higher education branches of the University College Union voted in favor of a series of motions calling for collective action on pensions, wages and other conflicts such as precarious workforces. work – with some motions calling for a swift poll of UCU members and potential strikes before Christmas.

But a final decision on the timing and legal issues involved will be made by the union’s higher education committee on Monday, with some members fearing that strikes at the start of the new academic year could erode public and student support. .

Jo Grady, general secretary of the union, said: “The UCU higher education committee will meet on Monday to determine the timetable for industrial action on the issues of declining wages, dangerous workloads, widespread precariousness. , gender and ethnicity pay gaps, and reductions in USS pensions.

“The university leadership still has time to avoid widespread disruption in the coming months, but to do so, it must resume negotiations and make credible offers on wages, working conditions and pensions. “

The higher education committee will need to distinguish between overlapping motions adopted by the special conference, including motions proposed by branches of Lancaster University and Glasgow University which call for the ballot to be ended at the end of October and a possible strike in November.

Any campus strike would be an early test for Nadhim Zahawi as education secretary, given the potential for disruption and demands for tuition reimbursement by students if the action is backed by a significant number of students. universities in England.

The unrest is a continuation of the long-standing dispute over pensions affecting teachers, technicians, researchers and administrators of institutions where staff are members of the University Pension Scheme (USS). Administrators say the plan cannot afford to pay the same level of retirement benefits in the future without higher contributions from staff and employers.

More than 50,000 UCU members at 74 universities, including Liverpool, Bristol and Cardiff, backed industrial action that spanned from November 2019 to February 2020, with the action finally coming to an end when the Covid pandemic s ‘is installed.

The latest dispute was sparked by pension cuts offered by Universities UK (UUK), which represents employers, to address an estimated £ 14 billion to £ 18 billion funding gap in the USS scheme. The union argues that an average staff member will lose about a third of their guaranteed retirement benefits. According to Grady, the cuts would also discourage low-paid staff from joining the USS, threatening the viability of the program as a whole.

Employers – which include nongovernmental agencies and research institutes as well as universities – say a planned consultation on changes to the scheme could still lead to changes in their proposals.

A spokesperson for USS employers said, “We hope that the UCU chooses not to vote in favor of industrial action, given that the USS’s formal assessment of the size of the deficit of the plan means that no change is an option, and employer proposals are the only formal alternative. at unaffordable contribution rates.

“The next member consultation on the UUK package is important and open – and could lead to changes in the proposals. Employers will continue to consider other benefit structures and formulas, provided they are viable, affordable and enforceable.

“The universities concerned would do their utmost to minimize the impact of any industrial action and to support student learning.”

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‘Disappointing’: At universities and colleges across Canada, online courses and COVID protocols lead to messy back-to-school https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/disappointing-at-universities-and-colleges-across-canada-online-courses-and-covid-protocols-lead-to-messy-back-to-school/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/disappointing-at-universities-and-colleges-across-canada-online-courses-and-covid-protocols-lead-to-messy-back-to-school/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 20:52:32 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/disappointing-at-universities-and-colleges-across-canada-online-courses-and-covid-protocols-lead-to-messy-back-to-school/ Markus Lai has completed orientation, attended his first classes and is ready for next fall in his new program at Seneca College. But he still hasn’t set foot on campus this term. Like many post-secondary students across the country, her entire list of civil engineering technician courses is online. “It’s disappointing,” Lai said of her […]]]>

Markus Lai has completed orientation, attended his first classes and is ready for next fall in his new program at Seneca College.

But he still hasn’t set foot on campus this term.

Like many post-secondary students across the country, her entire list of civil engineering technician courses is online.

“It’s disappointing,” Lai said of her all-virtual class load, which requires sitting in front of a computer for “about three to six hours a day.”

“He feels quite distant.”

September is far from normal for Canadian universities and colleges as students return to class. Many courses (in some cases all) are still online, despite the high tuition fees. Some students even face last minute transitions to virtual learning.

Others are dissatisfied with the precautions currently in place and are not convinced that the vaccination mandates will be implemented.

The complicated start is a far cry from the post-secondary experience they could have imagined and the official message all is well from the administrations.

Seneca College did not respond to a request for comment, but Lai said all classes in her program are virtual only until further notice. This seems to be a trend for many post-secondary students in September. While not all courses are online, many students, especially in arts programs, found themselves with an entirely virtual course load.

After starting her post-secondary studies online, Ayan Absiye, a second-year political science and international relations student at the University of Toronto, was eager to finally gain the full and traditional campus experience her siblings recounted. stories. She had to attend four classes on campus and one online. But recently her schedule has abruptly changed, with all four in-person classes being moved to virtual platforms.

“I was delighted to meet new people, to meet my teachers face to face, to join clubs, to go to sporting events, to the library,” said the 19-year-old. “There are so many things that I miss. “

Absiye took days off to prepare for her classes in person and planned her restaurant hours for the year based on the assumption that classes would resume on campus. She has friends who returned to the province from overseas and moved into a residence, only to find themselves with an unnecessary financial burden after their classes were also transferred online, Absiye added.

“We were getting several emails saying we were going to be in person… it’s inconvenient for people who are managing their time,” she said. “It is reckless to give us notice so late.”

Meanwhile, faculty members try to balance security concerns and the learning experiences of their students.

Terezia Zorić, president of the Association of Professors at the University of Toronto and professor at OISE, said a “record number” of staff and faculty felt in danger of returning to campus, in especially those who teach in large classes with three-digit student numbers.

Hundreds of professors and staff are now “in panic” because the vaccine’s mandate “is not yet operational,” among other concerns, she said. Parents of children under 12 who cannot be vaccinated are particularly concerned, as are those whose family members are immunocompromised.

“There was a chaotic approach. It’s really unfair for the students, ”said Zorić. “I am embarrassed that our university has not been more respectful of its students, staff, faculty and librarians for taking a more methodical and careful approach.”

Professors and staff feel “betrayed” by the institution, she added. “We can’t wait to get back to campus, but only when it’s safe enough to do so. We share this feeling with the students.

Several schools have also seen incidents of major parties, often involving unmasked students.

Kingston police are cracking down after overcrowded rallies at Queen’s University and have made several arrests after another weekend of celebration. And amid reports of heckling at Western University during orientation week, more serious allegations have also been raised, including several reports of sexual assault being investigated by London Police.

Experts from the Dalla Lana School of Public Health who sit on the university’s central health and safety committee have compiled a checklist of safety guidelines that they say must be followed if the administration “wishes to schedule. important in-person activities while COVID-19 remains a public health concern. ”

About 55% of the 16,000 courses offered this fall at the University of Toronto were scheduled for in-person classes, a spokesperson said. Individual academic units, in conjunction with their instructors and faculty, determine what they do in person rather than online. Only classrooms that have been upgraded to a minimum of six air changes per hour will be used this quarter, the spokesperson added.

The gap between the paper experience and the actual campus experience this year is the subject of a recent open letter to students from Professor Andrew Hamilton-Wright at the University of Guelph.

Emails from the university administration over the summer “underscored this idea of ​​a normal campus experience” and that campus security would be “of the highest priority”, a- he declared. Yet concerns remain about transmission and ventilation outside of classrooms, such as in hallways, common areas, libraries, cafeterias and bathrooms; a problem taken up by the faculty of the U of T.

“Now, the classes are starting and people are noticing that indeed a lot of these things that people thought might be a problem is a problem, and no one took care of it,” said Hamilton-Wright. “You can’t value health and safety and do nothing about health and safety. “

A number of professors have recently decided to replace their in-person lessons with online lessons, he added.

Shoshanah Jacobs, associate professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of Guelph, said the university does not “check and verify” enough vaccine literature. Because she has tenure, she was able to do all of her lessons remotely, which she believes is the safest option. But not everyone has this privilege.

University of Guelph spokeswoman Deirdre Healey said in an email that the university has strict COVID protocols in place based on public health guidelines and that anyone intending to access university buildings or facilities must submit proof of vaccination or receive an approved exemption request, via the proof of vaccination and exemption system.

Jacobs also said there were hundreds of students left looking for a place to safely distance themselves on campus for virtual lessons that take place right before or after in-person lessons.

“This is one of the types of examples of how they pass all of this responsibility on to individuals,” she said.

“Our leaders have been so adamant and so unwilling to adapt to current circumstances.”

The library is available and the administration is working on securing spaces in buildings, Healey said.

The vaccine mandate was the first step in responding to the evolving situation in Delta, but given that it went into effect on September 7, professors who were expected to teach in person have the option of going remotely up to to September 28, she added.

While it helps juggle full-time work with the school, Lai de Seneca, who suffers from ADHD, said students like him work best in a physical classroom, where they can approach the instructor afterwards. courses and access campus resources such as tutors. It’s also more difficult to meet people.

He still pays the full tuition fees and would like to see the fees reduced, to reflect his new reality. But at least, unlike Absiye from the U of T, he knew in advance what the plan was.

Thousands of University of Calgary students were also surprised to discover that their classes had been moved online less than two weeks before the start of the school year, according to student union president Nicole Schmidt.

University of Calgary spokeswoman Michelle Crossland said in an email that the pandemic had forced them to make “tough decisions in a short period of time.” She added that they are working to support affected students, including eliminating the cost of transit and campus recreation for those whose schedules are fully online.

But many had already paid for things like parking passes or even, in the case of international students, had traveled the world and spent thousands of dollars on flights “so they could sit in front of their laptops in a dorm, ”Schmidt said.

“This decision was made without planning ahead and the students are paying the price very literally.”

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How Biden’s New Vaccine Mandate May Affect Private Colleges and Universities | https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/how-bidens-new-vaccine-mandate-may-affect-private-colleges-and-universities/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/how-bidens-new-vaccine-mandate-may-affect-private-colleges-and-universities/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:41:44 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/how-bidens-new-vaccine-mandate-may-affect-private-colleges-and-universities/ Higher education workers will likely be asked to get vaccinated or take tests every week to prevent the spread of COVID. Photo from whitehouse.gov As part of his “Exiting the Pandemic Plan,” President Joe Biden said on Thursday that large private companies must require their employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or provide proof of […]]]>

Higher education workers will likely be asked to get vaccinated or take tests every week to prevent the spread of COVID.

Photo from whitehouse.gov

As part of his “Exiting the Pandemic Plan,” President Joe Biden said on Thursday that large private companies must require their employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or provide proof of negative tests every week. This general guideline can also apply to the thousands of higher education institutions that have not yet implemented these requirements for faculty, staff and administrators.

Under the new rule, any business with 100 or more employees must comply with a rule implemented and overseen by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). While the administration’s guidelines are heavily focused on companies and K-12 schools, colleges will likely have to follow suit, even in states where there are vaccine passport bans and there has been reluctance. to implement them.

The president’s action comes at a time when COVID-19 rates are rising nationwide due to the delta variant and hospitalizations have increased because too few young adults have received doses of Pfizer / BioNTech vaccines (Comirnaty), Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. This includes a large student population and some employees who can put themselves or others at risk.

“We have been patient, but our patience is running out and your refusal has cost us all,” Biden said at a press conference Thursday. “While America is in much better shape than it was seven months ago when I took office… we are in a tough time, and this could go on for some time.”

Several colleges and universities that have reopened for the fall semester have already seen epidemics on their campuses, even where vaccination rates have reached 90%. Some professors where mitigation measures are more relaxed have expressed concerns about the lack of protection in their institutions, especially in conservative states. While it’s likely there will be legal challenges to Biden’s mandate, institutions now have the backing of strong federal guidelines as well as the arm of OSHA to make more solid decisions.

“I think [college] presidents could say today: “There was an executive decree issued by the president yesterday that employers with more than 100 employees must mandate vaccines or perform weekly tests for those who are presumed to be vaccinated.” We are implementing this now because federal law requires us to do so, ”says Lynn Pasquerella, president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC & U). “I think they would be protected. Then it goes to litigation. But we saw in Indiana, where they made vaccinations mandatory and won their legal challenge in court, and the Supreme Court refused to hear that case. I believe that institutions, especially if their decisions are based on their mission and a commitment to the well-being of faculty, students, staff and community members, are here on solid foundations.

Over 1,000 colleges and universities across the country already have mandates in place, most for students, faculty and staff. That leaves about 3,000 who still do not have increased safeguards in place. So far, many have relied on encouraging people to adhere to mask and distancing guidelines and to get vaccinated. Pasquerella says it’s time for these institutions to step up and join others who have done so.

“The AAC&U has been pretty clear in saying that colleges should mandate vaccines,” she says. “For us, it’s a question of fairness. The President made it clear in his comments that COVID-19 has had a disparate impact on communities of color. Of all the things students need to worry about today, they shouldn’t have to worry about getting sick because the student next to them hasn’t been vaccinated.

“We have also seen the moral distress experienced by the leaders of state institutions that have banned the obligation of vaccines and masks,” adds Pasquerella. “They feel helpless. So here is an opportunity now to say federal law will prevail over state law and do what they think is right. “

Biden’s six-point plan targets 80 million Americans who have yet to receive vaccines. Part of its mission is to get as many adults vaccinated – through companies across the country – to further protect populations 12 and under who are not yet eligible. These students, he said, should be able to attend K-12 schools in person safely. He also wants to increase testing and require masking in high traffic areas and provide additional assistance to people with COVID.

One of the other notable line items that could have a direct impact on colleges and universities is the requirement that major entertainment venues impose vaccines or entrance tests. Over the past weekend, many colleges had full stadiums for football games, with crowds largely unmasked and not socially distanced.

It is not known how all of the requirements will be implemented or what costs companies or institutions will incur to allow testing of individuals.

“We would like the administration to further clarify the implications of [the requirements], but its mandate was quite broad, ”says Pasquerella. “He said you have to force vaccinations or you have to have weekly tests. And then the question becomes: who bears the cost of these tests? I would be tempted, if I were an institution that had the mandate, to say: “If you refuse to be vaccinated, unless you have religious or health exemptions, then you will bear the cost. And I know that some institutions have done it when it comes to students.

Regardless of how it is executed, Pasquerella says the new requirements are welcome.

“For me, there is a larger ethical issue about what we owe each other as citizens in a democracy,” says Pasquerella. “Sometimes we violate individual rights for the public good. Most importantly, we need to understand this as we examine the commemoration around 9/11 (and the restrictions and policies imposed on citizens passing through airports, for example). “

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Regents ask for an additional $ 15 million in state aid for Iowa universities https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/regents-ask-for-an-additional-15-million-in-state-aid-for-iowa-universities/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/regents-ask-for-an-additional-15-million-in-state-aid-for-iowa-universities/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 21:09:12 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/regents-ask-for-an-additional-15-million-in-state-aid-for-iowa-universities/ Iowa State to Get Biggest Credit Increase The exterior of the Iowa State Capitol building can be seen in Des Moines on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 (Andy Abeyta / The Gazette) IOWA CITY – The Iowa Board of Regents – refused any increase in state funding for its public universities in the last legislative session […]]]>

Iowa State to Get Biggest Credit Increase

The exterior of the Iowa State Capitol building can be seen in Des Moines on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 (Andy Abeyta / The Gazette)

IOWA CITY – The Iowa Board of Regents – refused any increase in state funding for its public universities in the last legislative session – is asking for a $ 15 million increase in its higher education appropriations for the next fiscal year.

If granted, the board promises the largest share – $ 7 million – would go to Iowa State University, with the University of Iowa and the University of Northern Iowa receiving $ 4 million each. This is different from the demands of the board of directors in recent years – which pledged equal amounts to the UI and ISU, its research institutes, and a lesser amount to its smaller UNI.

Regent’s documents outlining his requests for credits for fiscal 2023 did not explicitly explain the higher amount for the state of Iowa – which for at least a decade has enrolled the most students among the three while receiving less state funds than unemployment insurance.

If lawmakers grant the council-requested $ 15 million increase, total higher education funding for Iowa’s three public universities would drop from $ 486 million to $ 501 million. Even if the state of Iowa gets the biggest share of this bump, as proposed, its total funding of $ 179.1 million would still be well below the total UI funding of $ 219.6 million. .

In addition to an additional $ 15 million for higher education funding, the council is seeking increased support for its special schools, economic development activities and specialized units – like the interface-based State Hygienic Lab. user – bringing the total requested increase to $ 22.1 million.

If approved, the council’s total state appropriations would increase from $ 616.6 million to $ 638.6 million, according to council documents.

Last year, at the height of the COVID pandemic, the board requested an additional $ 29.3 million – including $ 18 million for higher education and a return of $ 8 million that the State cut in 2020 due to the pandemic. Lawmakers rejected this request, keeping higher education operating funding flat.

In light of the denial, the Board of Regents increased tuition fees this fall for all students at its three public universities, including UNI, which hoped to keep rates frozen to remain competitive among its regional peers.

The board’s 2023 funding request – which it will consider approving next week at its monthly meeting – outlines how each campus will use its extra money, if any.

University of Iowa will use an additional $ 4 million to:

  • Hire and retain mental health professionals because “academic success is directly linked to the physical and mental well-being of students”;
  • Providing financial aid and other support services to qualified residents of Iowa pursuing a degree in a high-demand field – such as computer science, education, financial consulting, and engineering;
  • Develop academic guidance and teaching practices, focusing on departments and courses with higher enrollment “and / or where there is potential to increase retention and graduation rates”.

State of Iowa will use its $ 7 million bonus to:

  • Closing the gaps in retention and graduation rates among certain groups of students through curriculum improvements in high-enrollment courses, academic counseling and tutoring, support for first generation students and programs that help transfer students succeed;
  • Support access and affordability for Iowa residents through targeted financial assistance;
  • Promote economic opportunities in Iowa by expanding ISU’s innovation and entrepreneurship programs;
  • Retain the best performing faculty and staff – the state of Iowa reporting average faculty salaries equivalent to only 88% of peer institutions, up from 98% a decade ago;
  • Support for one-time start-up costs and recurring staff costs associated with e-learning, enabling the UIS to “modernize and expand the e-portfolio”.

University of Northern Iowa will use its additional $ 4 million to:

  • Realign its tuition and compulsory fees with its regional counterparts – which on average $ 2,820 less in tuition and compulsory fees than research institutions in their states, while UNI costs $ 735 less than the fees of average undergraduate resident tuition and compulsory fees at UI and ISU;
  • Increase the number of registrations and honor the second year of a negotiated contract for employee salary increases;
  • Increase your graduation rate in four years.

Vanessa Miller covers higher education for The Gazette.

Comments: (319) 339-3158; vanessa.miller@thegazette.com

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Virginia universities begin to deport unvaccinated students | Virginia https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/virginia-universities-begin-to-deport-unvaccinated-students-virginia/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/virginia-universities-begin-to-deport-unvaccinated-students-virginia/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 21:04:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/virginia-universities-begin-to-deport-unvaccinated-students-virginia/ (The Center Square) – Some universities in Virginia have started to kick out students who refuse to be vaccinated against COVID-19 and other institutions may start to follow suit. Virginia Tech unsubscribed 134 students this week who did not receive the vaccine. Prior to that, the University of Virginia deregistered 288 students and William & […]]]>

(The Center Square) – Some universities in Virginia have started to kick out students who refuse to be vaccinated against COVID-19 and other institutions may start to follow suit.

Virginia Tech unsubscribed 134 students this week who did not receive the vaccine. Prior to that, the University of Virginia deregistered 288 students and William & Mary withdrew 42 students for the same reason. All three universities require students to be vaccinated against COVID-19, unless they are given a medical or religious exemption.

“Of the approximately 37,000 students enrolled at Virginia Tech, 134 students were not in compliance with COVID-19 vaccination requirements, meaning they did not submit vaccination documents or received a medical exemption. or religious, “said a statement on the Virginia Tech website. “These students have been deregistered. The university does not know if any of these students did not intend to return for reasons unrelated to the requirement for the COVID-19 vaccine. “

Other state universities have policies that require non-exempt students to be vaccinated, including George Mason University and Virginia Commonwealth University. Old Dominion University and James Madison University require that unvaccinated students who do not receive an exemption or sign a risk-taking form be tested regularly.

James Madison University spokesperson Ginny Cramer told The Center Square that students who fail to submit proof of vaccination or sign the risk-taking will have their college ID cards disabled. Those who are not vaccinated will have to take weekly COVID-19 tests and will be withdrawn from classes if three tests are missed.

“The latest warnings are being sent to students who have not submitted proof of vaccination or a risk waiver assumption,” Cramer said. “Many students are already following up to submit documents.… Conversations are underway to consider possible additional repercussions for those who have not submitted either the vaccination documents or the risk waiver hypothesis.”

Although it also has a vaccine requirement, Virginia Commonwealth University has not deregistered students who have failed to get vaccinated. A university spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment from The Center Square, but the Richmond Times-Dispatch reported the university will consider deregistering them.

Center Square contacted a spokesperson for Old Dominion University, who passed on an email sent to the students outlining the vaccination rules and the testing rules for the unvaccinated. The spokesperson did not respond to questions about whether the ODU would remove the students or to what extent the rules would be enforced.

George Mason University did not respond to a request for comment.

Vaccine requirements have been clamped down by student groups, such as Young Americans for Liberty and Turning Point USA. In June, students affiliated with YAL sent a petition to Virginia Tech, who asked them to end the mandate.

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Reexamine the past of Western universities, but not their academic values https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/reexamine-the-past-of-western-universities-but-not-their-academic-values/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/reexamine-the-past-of-western-universities-but-not-their-academic-values/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/reexamine-the-past-of-western-universities-but-not-their-academic-values/ Amid strong and understandable calls for the decolonization of the curriculum, the dominance of “Western” knowledge itself has at times come under attack. For example, in a recent article by News from academia, Simon Marginson, professor of higher education at the University of Oxford, complained about “Anglo-American globalization” and “its forced uniformity of cultures and […]]]>

Amid strong and understandable calls for the decolonization of the curriculum, the dominance of “Western” knowledge itself has at times come under attack.

For example, in a recent article by News from academia, Simon Marginson, professor of higher education at the University of Oxford, complained about “Anglo-American globalization” and “its forced uniformity of cultures and languages, the stigma and exclusion of everything which is different ”.

“All endogenous (indigenous) knowledge is excluded,” he wrote. “The closure is supported by this deep Anglo-American conviction that ‘our’ culture is not only the best, but sufficient and that no further ideas are necessary.”

But Western conceptions of knowledge underpin the idea of ​​the Western university – and it is striking how much this idea has been adopted around the world.

Universities of the “Western model” were created in the countries of the South mainly in the 19th century. Colonialism was, of course, the main driver. The efforts of Christian missionaries also played an important role – and often the two were linked.

The colonizers had different approaches to higher education. The British have been active in authorizing or sponsoring it, the French less so, while the Portuguese have avoided academic development altogether. Spanish higher education has “outsourced” higher education to the Catholic Church, in particular to the Jesuits, with the dual objective of Christian conversions and colonial management. All recognized the need for a small western educated indigenous class to manage the colonies.

In India, the modest expansion of higher education under colonialism was largely the result of missionary efforts and Indian initiatives to provide access to the burgeoning civil service and commerce to an emerging middle class. The British authorities invested little in higher education until 1857, only then trying to control this nascent sector.

Unsurprisingly, the institutions that emerged followed the British model and used English as the language of instruction. It is, of course, significant that all colonial universities used the language of the colonizer – and many former colonies still do.

Many parts of the world had rich intellectual, religious and educational traditions before the advent of colonialism. Universities were first established in South Asia – Taxila and Nalanda. Al-Qarawiyyin University in Fez and Al-Azhar University in Cairo also predate the first European universities – and both still exist today. But while intellectual and religious traditions continued in South Asia and the Arab world, traditional academic institutions could not compete successfully and were gradually eclipsed by the alternatives of the Western model.

Colonial universities used the languages ​​of the settlers since their main purpose was to train people to endow colonial governments. Likewise, the curriculum has been entirely imported from the metropolis. It is only a slight oversimplification to sum up colonial attitudes towards indigenous cultures in the words of British administrator Thomas Babbington Macaulay: “A single shelf from a good European library was worth all the indigenous literature of India and of Arabia ”.

Interestingly, however, in the postcolonial era no country returned to a pre-colonial higher education model. Moreover, it is not only the colonized nations that have adopted the Western model of higher education. For example, after the Meiji Restoration in 1868, Japan sought an academic model that would serve a modernizing society and, after careful consideration of options, adopted German and American approaches, ignoring centuries-old indigenous traditions.

Likewise, when Thailand sought to modernize its higher education and society, in part to ward off possible colonial incursions, Western models were chosen, resulting in the establishment of Chulalongkorn University in 1917. In any case, non-colonized countries seeking to modernize higher education adopt a traditional indigenous model.

The Chinese experience is also significant. In an article titled “World-Class Universities in China’s Heroic Past,” recently published in International higher education, Yang Rui points out that a variety of Western Christian missionary institutions, as well as the Chinese government’s use of Western models in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, had an influence on the development of education modern superior in China – and have proven themselves. Significantly, the powerful traditional Confucian educational model has not been used to guide China’s modernization, with the possible exception of the traditional civil service examination which has become the gaokao.

When the countries of the South became independent, they maintained and extended the Western academic model, seen as an essential instrument for nation building and human capital development. Despite a wide variety of economic systems, political realities, stages of socio-economic development, and religious and cultural traditions, almost all 21st century universities follow a largely Western model.

Much can certainly be done to make these institutions more inclusive, sustainable and socially responsible. A growing number have started to re-examine their pasts with a critical eye, recognizing their close association with difficult times in their country’s history, such as slavery, apartheid or discrimination against indigenous population groups. They began to adapt their programs to the experience of traditionally oppressed and marginalized social groups.

At the same time, it is essential to safeguard the core values ​​of the Western academic model, dedicated to the search for truth based on scientific evidence and academic freedom. Mathematician and philosopher Alfred North Whitehead memorably portrayed the role of universities as uniting imagination and experience. In a world full of great challenges, this task has never been so vital.

Philip G. Altbach is Professor-Researcher and Distinguished Fellow, Center for International Higher Education, Boston College, USA. Jamil Salmi is a higher education expert, emeritus professor of higher education policy at Diego Portales University, Chile, and former higher education coordinator at the World Bank.

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The 30 universities with the largest endowments https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-30-universities-with-the-largest-endowments/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-30-universities-with-the-largest-endowments/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 23:00:02 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-30-universities-with-the-largest-endowments/ University is a costly investment, which means that many students may need financial assistance in the form of endowments from a university. These are trust funds that generate income from donated money and financial assets – and some Ivy League college endowments are said to be in the tens of billions. Bill Staib, CEO of […]]]>

University is a costly investment, which means that many students may need financial assistance in the form of endowments from a university.

These are trust funds that generate income from donated money and financial assets – and some Ivy League college endowments are said to be in the tens of billions.

Bill Staib, CEO of higher education comparison site College Raptor, responsible for this analysis, suggests that the size of a university’s endowment “may provide a useful benchmark when students and their families research the top colleges. better suited “.

“A large endowment often means that the institution can provide more financial aid, can invest more in quality faculties and facilities, and can establish unique experiential programs and initiatives, all of which contribute to student success,” did he declare. News week.

The data, sourced from the Department of Education’s IPED data center using the most recent endowment data (2018-2019), shows how all but one of the institutions in the top ten endowments (Northwestern University) performed increased over the past year.

Read on to find the most endowed US universities, according to College Raptor’s analysis.

30. Boston University ($ 2,311,388,000)

Founded in 1839, Boston is a private East Coast research college with historic affiliation with The United Methodist Church.

The most popular majors offered at this Massachusetts-based university include business, communications, and economics.

29. University of Rochester ($ 2,318,529,000)

Rochester is a private, New York-based research college, considered one of the smallest and most collegiate of America’s most elite universities.

Popular majors at this popular mid-sized higher education institution include Nursing, Biology, and Computer Science.

28. Pomona College ($ 2,321,097,000)

Founded in 1887, Pomona is a private liberal arts university located in Claremont, California.

The most popular majors at this college range from Economics, Mathematics, and Computer Science.

27. Boston College ($ 2,433,821,107)

Boston is a private Jesuit research college in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, founded in 1863.

Popular majors at this popular mid-size institution include economics, psychology, and finance.

26. Amherst College ($ 2,473,283,206)

Established in 1821, Amherst College is a private liberal arts institution based in Amherst, Massachusetts.

Popular majors at this highly-rated private college include Mathematics, Economics, and Research and Experimental Psychology.

25. University of Richmond ($ 2,513,209,000)

The University of Richmond is a private, non-profit, Virginia-based liberal arts college.

Popular majors at this university include Business, Organizational Behavior Studies, and Liberal Arts and Humanities.

24. Williams College (2 744 103 362)

Founded in 1793, Williams is a private liberal arts university located in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

The most popular majors at this college are Economics, English, and Political Science, and Government.

23. California Institute of Technology ($ 2,987,001,000)

Caltech is an elite, small-scale private research university located in the city of Pasadena, California.

Popular majors at this institution with extremely competitive admission rates include Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering.

22. Brown University ($ 3,976,694,000)

Founded in 1764, Brown is a private Ivy League research college in Providence, Rhode Island.

Popular majors at this elite mid-sized institution include computer science, biology, and economics.

21. New York University ($ 4,219,313,605)

Established in 1831, New York University is a private research institution based in New York
Alexi Rosenfeld / Getty Images

Founded in 1831, New York University is a New York-based private research institution.

Some of the most popular majors at this college are Liberal Arts and Humanities, Economics, and Business.

20. University of Pittsburgh ($ 4,289,974,484)

The University of Pittsburgh is a state-linked public research college located in Pennsylvania.

Popular majors at this institution, which is home to 17 undergraduate and graduate schools and colleges, include psychology, finance, and biology.

19. Dartmouth College ($ 5,731,322,087)

Dartmouth College is a private Ivy League research university in Hanover, New Hampshire and the ninth oldest institution of higher education in the United States.

Popular majors at this institution, which are said to have graduated 95 percent of the students, include economics, political and government science, and engineering.

18. University of Southern California ($ 5,739,565,000)

Founded in 1880, USC is a highly regarded private research college located in Los Angeles.

Popular majors at this institution with an extremely competitive admission rate include Business, Biology, and Communications.

17. Vanderbilt University ($ 6,270,876,534)

Vanderbilt is a private research college based in Nashville, Tennessee and established in 1873.

Popular majors at this university range from economics, social science research methods, and liberal arts and humanities.

16. Johns Hopkins University ($ 6,275,939,000)

Johns Hopkins is a private college based in Baltimore, Maryland, considered the very first research university in the United States

Popular majors at this university include public health, neuroscience, and neurobiology and cell biology.

15. Rice University ($ 6,506,177,000)

William Marsh Rice is a private research college located in the heart of Houston, Texas.

Some of the most popular majors at this university include Information Science, Economics, and Mechanical Engineering.

14. Cornell University ($ 6,974,636,536)

Founded in 1865, Cornell is a private Ivy League research college based in Ithaca, New York.

Popular majors at this large, highly-rated higher education institution include biology, computer science, and hospitality and tourism management.

13. University of Chicago ($ 7,244,602,984)

University of Chicago
Founded in 1890, the University of Chicago is a private research college based in Chicago, Illinois.
peterspiro / Getty Images

Founded in 1890, the University of Chicago is a private research college based in Chicago, Illinois.

The popular majors of this prestigious institution range from economics, mathematics and public policy analysis.

12. Washington University at St. Louis ($ 8,130,483,000)

The University of Washington at Saint-Louis is a private research college in Greater Saint-Louis.

The popular majors of the institution, founded in 1853, include computer science, finance, and biology.

11. Northwestern University ($ 8,244,818,000)

Founded in 1851, Northwestern is an elite private research college located in Evanston, Illinois.

Popular majors at this educational institution with an extremely competitive admission rate include economics, psychology, and journalism.

10. Duke University ($ 8,609,004,000)

Duke University is a private research college in Durham, North Carolina, founded by Methodists and Quakers in 1838.

Popular majors at this elite institution include computer science, economics, and public policy analysis.

9. Emory University ($ 8,626,248,037)

Emory University
Emory University is a private research college based in Atlanta, Georgia
Just Amber / Getty Images

Founded in 1836, Emory University is a private research college based in Atlanta, Georgia.

Some of the most popular majors at this elite institution include business, nursing, and biology.

8. Columbia University ($ 10,950,738,000)

Columbia is a private research college of the Ivy League and the oldest institution of higher education in New York City.

The popular majors of this elite institution established in 1754 include economics, computer science and political science, and government.

7. University of Notre-Dame ($ 11,565,964,000)

Founded in 1842, ND is a private research college located in Notre Dame, Indiana.

Popular majors at Notre Dame, which are said to have graduated 96 percent of students, include finance, economics and political science, and government.

6. University of Pennsylvania ($ 14,649,761,000)

The University of Pennsylvania is a private Ivy League research college in Philadelphia and is considered one of nine colonial colleges established before the United States’ Declaration of Independence.

Popular majors to be taken at this great institution of higher education include finance, management science and information systems, and philosophy.

5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology ($ 17,443,750,000)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Aerial view of the Grand Dome of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) at night, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Wangkun Jia / Getty Images

Founded in 1861, MIT is a private land grant research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The most popular majors at this elite college include computer science, mechanical engineering, and math.

4. Princeton University ($ 25,623,628,250)

Princeton is a private Ivy League research college in Princeton, New Jersey and founded in 1746.

Popular majors at this university with a 98% graduation rate include computer science, economics, and public policy analysis.

3. Stanford University ($ 27,699,834,000)

Consistently ranked among the best universities in the world, Stanford is a private research college based in California.

Popular majors at this elite private university include computer science, engineering, and biology.

2. Yale University ($ 30,295,000,000)

Yale University
Yale University is an elite private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut and the third oldest institution of higher education in the United States.
f11photo / Getty Images

Yale University is an elite Ivy League private research university in New Haven, Connecticut and the third oldest institution of higher education in the United States.

Popular majors at this liberal arts college include economics, political science, government, and history.

1. Harvard University ($ 40,929,700,000)

Founded in 1636 and named in honor of its first benefactor, Puritan clergyman John Harvard, the private Ivy League research college based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

With an acceptance rate of just 5%, admissions are extremely competitive at Harvard, where popular majors include economics, computer science, political science, and government.

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Convocation VNSGU: “The universities of our country leave a lot to be desired” https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/convocation-vnsgu-the-universities-of-our-country-leave-a-lot-to-be-desired/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/convocation-vnsgu-the-universities-of-our-country-leave-a-lot-to-be-desired/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 22:35:34 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/convocation-vnsgu-the-universities-of-our-country-leave-a-lot-to-be-desired/ Surat Police Commissioner Ajay Kumar Tomar said on Tuesday that our country’s universities “leave a lot to be desired.” He was addressing the 52nd graduation ceremony of Veer Narmad University of South Gujarat (VNSGU) in Surat, of which he was the main guest, on the occasion of the 188th anniversary of the birth of the […]]]>

Surat Police Commissioner Ajay Kumar Tomar said on Tuesday that our country’s universities “leave a lot to be desired.”

He was addressing the 52nd graduation ceremony of Veer Narmad University of South Gujarat (VNSGU) in Surat, of which he was the main guest, on the occasion of the 188th anniversary of the birth of the famous poet, late Narmad.

Tomar, who advised students not to trust “the way society has judged them,” said: “If the university or a teacher or professor says you are not really good, don’t them. never believe. Brands don’t matter in life. The marks have no meaning in life other than the first class or the distinction in the certificate… ”

State Education Minister Bhupendrasinh Chudasama, who was the convocation guest, did not appear in person and participated virtually.

Vice Chancellor KN Chavda said: “State Education Minister Bhupendrasinh Chudasma was likely to remain present at the 52nd convocation meeting at VNSGU, but due to some work he didn’t was not present and he participated virtually in the event.

Tomar said: “In India, when we see our universities, it leaves a lot to be desired. It is our responsibility to improve it. The world is ruled by the nations with the best universities. Today America is the world power because it has many universities which are among the best universities in the world. “

During the event, 4,622 diplomas were awarded to students from 12 different sections, of which 26 doctoral degrees in philosophy were students of law, business, science, education, arts, management and computer science.

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