Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 09:36:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 It’s gonna be a big year in Charlotte’s politics https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/its-gonna-be-a-big-year-in-charlottes-politics/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 09:36:01 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/its-gonna-be-a-big-year-in-charlottes-politics/ Normally, Charlotte City Council which meets for the first time in 2022 on Monday would feature a few newly elected faces. But it’s not a normal year. What is happening: The fall 2021 local election was twice postponed, first because of a delay in the U.S. census results, and then because a state court wanted […]]]>

Normally, Charlotte City Council which meets for the first time in 2022 on Monday would feature a few newly elected faces.

But it’s not a normal year.

What is happening: The fall 2021 local election was twice postponed, first because of a delay in the U.S. census results, and then because a state court wanted more time to consider the lawsuits. From now on, all the electoral primaries will take place in May.

  • So the same 11-member council that has quarreled and launched into personal attacks will start another year together, with a slew of important items on the agenda.

Together with Mecklenburg County Commissioners and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School Board, local leaders this year will tackle issues such as transportation, development regulations and public safety.

Why is this important: The established wisdom is that little is done in local politics during election season. But from recovering from a pandemic to defining our city’s vision for the next several decades, politicians have a lot to do in 2022.

Here are some of the biggest issues local leaders will face.

Transit

Around the same time last year, leaders unveiled a major investment in expanding transportation in the region. Now his fate is at stake.

The context: In December 2020, the Charlotte MOVES task force convened by Mayor Vi Lyles unveiled the Transformational Mobility Network, a plan that includes new light rail lines, greenways, cycle paths, and improved roads and bus routes.

It has a high estimated price $ 13.5 billion, much of which would come from a 1-cent county sales tax increase that voters are expected to approve.

Yes, but: Several major obstacles remain:

  • The Republican-majority General Assembly is expected to approve a sales tax increase.
  • There is opposition from towns in northern Mecklenburg due to lack of movement for the construction of the LYNX Red Line, the long-awaited railway line north of Uptown. The tracks on which it would be built belong to Norfolk Southern, which has repeatedly refused to share them.

If these hurdles are overcome in some way, sales tax could be on the ballot this year. But even the city’s leaders are skeptical.

  • Right now it’s the best of times, ”Pro Tem Mayor Julie Eiselt tells me about the possibility of a vote in November. “I’m not holding my breath.”

But one thing that is certain: even if efforts fail, we’re almost certain to hear a lot about transit this year. And with nearly 400,000 people set to move to Charlotte over the next two decades, that conversation couldn’t come soon enough.

Charlotte Moves Working Group Report - Rail

Source: Charlotte Moves Task Force Report, City of Charlotte

Unified Development Ordinance

The city’s 2040 plan defined the city council in 2021. But all these fights were about a visionary document.

  • In 2022, the council will decide on the rules that will actually implement this vision, called the Unified Development Ordinance.

Details: The 600+ page document will serve as a rulebook for development in Charlotte, requirements for saving and disposing of trees to stormwater.

  • It also establishes zoning districts for residential, commercial and industrial areas (this is where the single-family home zoning changes in the 2040 plan come in).

Why is this important: It may not seem like an exciting read, but it is a key policy that will shape the city’s development. For example:

  • To help preserve Charlotte’s tree canopy, UDO is proposing to require any private owner to obtain a permit to remove trees over 30 inches in diameter, if they are not sick or falling.
  • It would also restrict vacation rental platforms like Airbnb, including limiting the number of short-term rentals in a given area.

And after: You can comment on the UDO online through Friday, and city staff will post another draft this spring. The city council is due to vote on the ordinance in July.

Infrastructure deficit

The state’s Department of Transportation faces an $ 11.6 billion budget deficit for transit projects, and Charlotte executives are bracing for delays and cuts.

The big picture: The city does not yet know which projects will be impacted. But as it should become clearer this year, city council will have to decide whether to fund certain improvements from its budget.

  • For example, in December, the council voted to reimburse Centene, a health insurance giant that is building an east coast headquarters in the university area, up to half the cost, or 6.5 million dollars, for the improvement of two intersections.
  • Both intersections are the responsibility of the state, but with the opening of the Centene campus this year, the city wanted projects to be a priority.

Construction on the Centene campus in June 2021. Photo: Katie Peralta Soloff / Axios

To note : The NCDOT financial hole only concerns projects that have already been funded. This means that items on the city’s wishlist – like street lighting, traffic lights, and crosswalks – are also changing rapidly.

Public security

With a gun crisis in our schools, the city and the nation, public safety will continue to dominate conversations, especially during campaigns 2022.

What is happening: By about halfway through the school year, 23 firearms were found on CMS campuses.

  • CMS has ordered transparent backpacks and will be implementing other security measures like more random projections.
  • But school board members and Superintendent Earnest Winston will likely face continued pressure to fix the issue this year.

The big picture: Although the number of homicides declined in 2021, gun violence is still pervasive in Charlotte and cities across the country, and disproportionately harms communities of color.

COVID-19 recovery

Elected officials will continue to fight the fallout from COVID-19 this year as more relief money flows in.

The context: The city, county and CMS will collectively receive $ 674.5 million from last year’s American Rescue Plan Act. Some of this money arrived last year and the rest will be distributed in May.

The city, which raises $ 142 million, allocated the first half of the money to three main categories: housing, workforce development, employment and community vitality. But leaders have yet to decide how to spend the remaining $ 71 million this year.

County of Mecklenburg released its strategy for disbursing $ 215 million in ARPA money in December. It prioritizes the use of the money for issues such as affordable housing, homelessness, health equity, parks and child care.

The bottom line: Money is seen as a unique opportunity to address the inequalities that the pandemic has exacerbated – if we make the most of it.

Elections this year

To note : Court decisions on the redistribution case could modify the information below.

May primary: Primary elections will be held on May 17 for Charlotte City Council, Mayor, and all other 2022 races (County Commission, United States House, United States Senate, North Carolina House and Senate, Courts, District Attorney , etc.)

July: By state law, the date of the city’s general election depends on whether there is a second federal primary anywhere in North Carolina, Michael Dickerson, Mecklenburg County Election Officer, tells me. A second primary takes place when none of the candidates in a primary receives a certain percentage of the vote.

  • But most likely, there will be one somewhere, which means that the general elections for city council and mayors will likely take place on July 26 if nothing changes.

November: General elections will be held for all other races in 2022, including the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School Board, which does not have a primary because its races are non-partisan.

You can see the full list of offices on the ballot in 2022 here.

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Popular Capriotti's sub-boutique expands to Charlotte with 10 locations


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Dallas’ original black high school site erased from history will now become a taxpayer-funded Kroger – DW https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/dallas-original-black-high-school-site-erased-from-history-will-now-become-a-taxpayer-funded-kroger-dw/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 03:29:21 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/dallas-original-black-high-school-site-erased-from-history-will-now-become-a-taxpayer-funded-kroger-dw/ Story by Amber Sims When I visited Marilyn Clark, now retired but a former education and outreach coordinator at the South Dallas Cultural Center, she handed me a little children’s book. Entitled “The Freedman Memorial: A Memorial, A Legacy,” the book was originally intended for distribution to ISD Dallas students to teach them the history […]]]>

Story by Amber Sims

When I visited Marilyn Clark, now retired but a former education and outreach coordinator at the South Dallas Cultural Center, she handed me a little children’s book.

Entitled “The Freedman Memorial: A Memorial, A Legacy,” the book was originally intended for distribution to ISD Dallas students to teach them the history of Freedman’s greater city of Dallas. It was rediscovered when the Central Expressway expansion project led to a startling discovery: the highway was built on top of the final resting place of hundreds of members of the black community.

Their community, destroyed almost 40 years earlier, was no longer hidden. Thanks to the tireless work of community members such as Mamie McKnight, Julia Jordan and many others, the site was adorned with a historical marker as well as a memorial to those whose remains had been disturbed.

It is not certain, however, that the children’s book ever made its way into the ISD Dallas classrooms.

In attempts to never forget again, this is exactly what could have happened.

The book opens with a dazzling and colorful illustrated map on the inside cover meant to recreate Freedman’s Town, a vibrant community that ran along the Central Railroad, before it was replaced by Central Expressway. The map represents such a large community that it almost spills over from the page. The community is estimated to cover nearly 276 acres of land located in what is today one of Dallas’ most expensive neighborhoods. Most people know it today as Uptown.

Also known as the Short North Dallas or State and Allen Community, Freedman’s Town was a “self-sufficient” black community that housed the families of newly freed Dallas slaves. They worked diligently to build their lives and create a community they could be proud of, despite the cruel racism and discrimination that surrounded them.

A writer for the WPA Dallas Guide and History proclaims: “Here, as in other major American cities, black sections have grown up because of these people’s natural tendency to live among their fellows.[1]

This rhetoric turns out to be false. Records indicate that as early as November 1865, the city of Dallas had enacted vagrancy laws that severely restricted the movement of blacks throughout the city. Thus, creating a black community was as much a method of survival as it was a practical one due to legal segregation, both written and unwritten in state and city charters. At the time of writing the guide in 1940, the city of Dallas had already, in 1916, “passed a law providing for segregation in residential areas, thus triggering a chain of events which culminated in a state law giving to cities the power to establish residential segregation ordinances.[2]

Seeing the community represented so completely on the pages, it’s hard to believe that only a few coveted historic structures remain, such as the legendary Booker T. Washington High School, St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, the Pythian Temple and the Moorland YMCA building, which became the Dallas Black Dance Theater after the Moorland branch moved to Oak Cliff.

Little remains of what was traced on the east side of the railroad, now the Central Expressway. The little shotgun houses, businesses, and sanatoriums (what we now call sanatoriums) are gone, along with the school listed on the map as the BF Darrell School, near the train tracks. at the intersection of Hall and Flora Street.

Today, there is nothing to indicate that the school ever existed there, nor any trace of the homes of the children who would have faithfully attended the school. What happened to BF Darrell and when did he disappear?

Well, that hasn’t completely gone away, because before it became the Barack Obama Male Leadership Academy, the Oak Cliff Magnetic School was named after Benjamin Franklin Darrell. Darrell came to Dallas in 1899 as one of the first black ISD Dallas educators to teach at Colored School No. 1, which later became Wright Cuney School before becoming Frederick Douglas School.[3] Noteworthy Color School No.1[4] was not located in this area and rather near what is now called the Cedars. Darrell himself lived not far from the school in ______.

Today, a drive-thru Starbucks with a small seating area can be found on North Hall Street, just off the Central Expressway, with the line of cars that normally crowd the road. Just south of this Starbucks, along Hall and across from one of the many ubiquitous apartment complexes that take over the neighborhood now known as Uptown, is an unmarked empty lot. As recently as 2020, the land BF Darrell once occupied is slated to become a Kroger grocery store. The grocery chain bought the land in 2015 from an apartment company that originally bought the land from the Dallas Housing Authority.

Being able to stand on BF Darrell’s wasteland can really dig deep into the size and scope of the neighborhood and what has been lost. The students would have attended school at the Hall and Cochran site from ___ to ____, long before Booker T. Washington was built. Even after the new high school opened, BF Darrell was still used to educate young black students in Dallas until it closed in 1969.

Although the nearby community of Roseland and its historically black church now seem out of place in a part of town dotted with dense apartments and posh new townhouses, longtime residents here know best. There was a time when little cabins dotted the plots of land, kids came and went from schools, to Griggs Park, to local cinemas and to the Paul Lawrence Dunbar. It was all leveled out to make room for “progress” and development that would reshape the community forever.

I remember the convenience stores, now demolished, that served customers who lived in the small shacks. I remember the pride that swelled with each anniversary year celebrated in our church – heralded as one of the oldest churches in town – and a story my mother told about where the church was located. before moving to the new shiny red brick building which was the only one I knew of. The church was a pillar of the community, but growing up, it was difficult for me to imagine that the wasteland was anything but empty.

Yet Mrs. Clark’s little book, a tangible pledge of black resistance and commitment to storytelling – proof that we existed – made real the richness of what was once known as Freedman’s Town. A treasured keepsake to ensure community members don’t forget and, when ready, those like me could once again unearth stories about the thriving black community that preceded Uptown. The thriving black community has bulldozed in the name of progress, highways and high-priced townhouses – and at the center of this once-black community, a school.

In some ways, I find it heartwarming that the grocery store was not built, even though I know Dallas well enough to assume that something else will eventually fill that lot. In my search to learn more about BF Darrell, I spoke with caring community elders who shared their wisdom and resources and told me to “keep going”. I spent time at the African American Museum with Dr. Marvin Dulaney before the pandemic shattered our normality and my archival research (although now I’m ready to return to it). I connected with members of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority beaming with pride to share the Fredrica Chase Dodd story, and one of the women sent me a copy of the book the Dallas Chapter published to tell the story. Ms. Dodd’s story and, by extension, the stories of many other Dallas greats such as Fredrica’s mother, Fannie C. Harris, and Dallas ISD’s first black woman principal, Julia Caldwell Frazier.

These three amazing women taught BF Darrell. In fact, many other Dallas ISD legends whose names now adorn our school buildings, such as JW Ray, Leslie Patton Jr., NW Harlee and countless others have also taught and led at BF Darrell.

This land is sacred ground in Black Dallas education and in the history of Dallas ISD education. This is why seeing it empty, without a historical marker, without any means of proclaiming its importance, seems unresolved. This is the reason why I had no idea that a few feet from my church and less than a mile from my current house was once the Color School # ??. Before being renamed BF Darrell for the late educator in 1922, it was simply labeled “The Colorful High School,” meaning it predated Booker T. Washington High School, which opened in 1923.

While trying to find records on the school and its history, I came across a story from the first black Dallas Morning News columnist Julia Scott Reed who realized the importance of the school’s closure in 1969. Then-superintendent Nolan Estes closed the school citing “failing ceilings, outside toilets, overcrowded classrooms and lack of parking space”. The old multi-storey school building became a non-profit space before being completely demolished in 1971 (1973).

“BF Darrell is a landmark in Dallas,” proclaimed Reed Scott’s column, shortly before the building was demolished.

Now, walking past the parking lot and seeing the multitude of people waiting daily for their coffee, I marvel at how unfortunate it is that they don’t know how close they are to our history. city ​​- and what that says about the history of our city.

How do you visualize a story that has been so intensely erased.

This piece is part of a project to explore, chronicle and retrieve the history of Dallas black schools. It is reported through a partnership of Dallas Free Press and the Imagining Freedom Institute, with the support of Press On’s Southern Movement Media Fund. For more information, send an email info@dallasfreepress.com Where info@theifinstitute.com.

Recently, the city council approved the construction of new residences (with some affordable housing) and

[1] (WPA, 291)

[2] the emergence of jim crow in texas bruce a. glasrud

[3] Daniel J. Nabors, “Darrell, Benjamin Franklin”, Texas Manual Online, accessed March 26, 2021, https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/darrell-benjamin-franklin.

[4] Records indicate that the first black private schools were opened at New Bethel Church and that the earth established its first schools for blacks. and what the establishment of the city’s first schools to educate former slaves and their offspring would tell us about our city.


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Gilmore Bell announces new director and shareholder https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/gilmore-bell-announces-new-director-and-shareholder/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/gilmore-bell-announces-new-director-and-shareholder/ SALT LAKE CITY – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Gilmore & Bell, PC, a public finance law firm, is pleased to announce that Jacob B. Carlton has been appointed Director of the Salt Lake City office. Mr. Carlton assists his clients with municipal finance matters, focusing on tax-exempt private business bonds, including housing and 501 (c) (3) […]]]>

SALT LAKE CITY – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Gilmore & Bell, PC, a public finance law firm, is pleased to announce that Jacob B. Carlton has been appointed Director of the Salt Lake City office.

Mr. Carlton assists his clients with municipal finance matters, focusing on tax-exempt private business bonds, including housing and 501 (c) (3) bonds. He is also experienced in the area of ​​mortgage income bonds and regularly acts as legal advisor to public housing authorities in multi-family residential rental bond transactions. In addition, he has represented government and local bond issuers as an advisor in charter school financings and LIHTC financings. Mr. Carlton was called to the Utah Bar in 2008. He received his BM (summa cum laude) from Weber State University in 2002 and his JD from Gonzaga University School of Law in 2008, where he was a writer. deputy chief of Gonzaga Law Review.

Gilmore & Bell, PC is also pleased to announce that Claymore K. (Clay) Hardman has been appointed shareholder of the Salt Lake City office.

Mr. Hardman focuses on municipal finance matters, with an emphasis on securities offerings, securitizations, secondary market transactions, mergers and acquisitions, corporate restructurings, corporate loan financings. tax and related transactions. He represents a variety of government entities, housing authorities, investment banks, lenders, loan officers, private and charter schools, and various 501 (c) (3) organizations. Mr. Hardman was called to the Utah Bar in 2015. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from Brigham Young University, Marriott School of Management in 2011 and his JD (Honors) from the University of Utah. , SJ Quinney College of Law in 2015 where he served as Executive Process Editor for the Utah Law Review and president of the Business Law Society.

About Gilmore Bell

Gilmore bell is one of the leading public finance law firms in the United States. The company primarily represents government entities and 501c3 organizations to negotiate financing alternatives, including bond and lease transactions, economic development incentives, and public-private partnerships. For more than 25 years, Gilmore Bell has ranked in the national top 10 for the number of opinions of bond advisers rendered on municipal bond issues. Gilmore Bell has offices in Utah, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Illinois. For more information, visit our website www.gilmorebell.com.


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Group of girls’ schools say they will not accept transgender students and ‘jeopardize’ their status as single-sex institutions https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/group-of-girls-schools-say-they-will-not-accept-transgender-students-and-jeopardize-their-status-as-single-sex-institutions/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 21:03:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/group-of-girls-schools-say-they-will-not-accept-transgender-students-and-jeopardize-their-status-as-single-sex-institutions/ A group from the country’s leading girls’ schools said they would not accept transgender students as it would “jeopardize” their status as single-sex institutions. The Girls’ Day School Trust (GDST), which represents 23 private schools as well as two academies, updated its gender identity policy guidance document last month to include a new section on […]]]>

A group from the country’s leading girls’ schools said they would not accept transgender students as it would “jeopardize” their status as single-sex institutions.

The Girls’ Day School Trust (GDST), which represents 23 private schools as well as two academies, updated its gender identity policy guidance document last month to include a new section on admissions.

It is rare for a single-sex school group to take a public stand on the admissions issue, and this could pave the way for others to follow suit.

The guidelines state that GDST schools do not accept applications from legally male students, even if they identify as female.

Having an admission policy based on ‘gender identity rather than legal sex recorded on a student’s birth certificate would jeopardize the status of GDST schools as single-sex schools’ under the law on equality, he said.

A student who begins the transition when she is already in school should be supported to stay in school for as long as she wants, he adds.

Updated guide

The guide, first published in 2016, was updated and shared with member schools just before the Christmas holidays. The GDST said it always kept its policies under review, adding that its latest guidelines were developed “in collaboration with experts, teachers and students.”

It comes as school leaders urge the government to release national guidelines on transgender issues for schools, saying education officials “are struggling” to cope.

School leaders said that in the absence of any official direction from the Department of Education (DfE), they ended up with the advice of pressure groups when deciding how to react when a student identified himself as being of the opposite sex.

Julie McCulloch of the Association of School of College Leaders (ASCL) said that as more children “come out” as transgender, leaders are forced to engage in the heated debate between biological sex and gender. genre.

“This is a very big problem and the lack of formal guidance for schools is something that concerns us,” she told The Telegraph.

“This problem has grown quite rapidly over the past few years and it certainly looks like something that has become much more common. Increasingly, this is something almost all schools need to think about, but unisex schools in particular. “

Referrals to gender identity clinics are increasing

The number of young people in the UK referred to gender identity clinics has increased 17-fold over the past decade, according to the figures.

Figures from the Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS), which is the only NHS facility for transgender children based at Tavistock Center in north London, show 2,383 young people were referred in 2021-2021, up from 138 in 2010- 11.

If a student announces to teachers that they wish to switch to the opposite sex, there may be a number of issues that the school needs to consider. First, they should decide what to say to the child’s parents, if anything. Then they should think about how to communicate the new gender of the child to their peers and teachers.

They may also consider whether the student should be allowed to use washrooms and locker rooms – as well as join sports teams – that match their new gender as opposed to their biological sex. This can be more complicated in a single-sex school where there are no separate facilities for boys and girls.

Meanwhile, single-sex schools face the added dilemma of what to do if a student applies on the basis of the gender they identify with rather than their biological sex.

Ms McCulloch said it was a “very difficult area” for a director to manage and added that ASCL members “often have difficulty” knowing how to respond.

Schools are committed to doing the right thing for all students

“They want to do the right thing for the child in transition and also to do the right thing for the other children in the school,” she explained.

“I think they’re caught between different interest groups, between the needs and wants of parents and students in different situations. There is advice from a whole range of organizations, but most of it comes from the position of this particular lobby group which is very difficult for schools to navigate. “

A number of different organizations publish their own advice for schools on what to do if a student identifies as transgender.

Stonewall, a charity that champions LGBTQ + rights and works with 600 schools each year through its School and Colleges Champions membership program, provides advice to schools on transgender issues.

He says trans students should generally be allowed to use washrooms and locker rooms as well as join sports teams that “match their gender identity” unless there are “reasonable safety concerns. “.

He adds that children should be allowed to stay in the residence or boarding school “in which they feel most comfortable”. Citing the Equality Act of 2010, Stonewall also claims that a trans child can attend a single-sex school that matches their gender identity rather than their biological sex.

Orientation for primary schools

Equaliteach, an organization funded by the DfE, also publishes guidance for elementary schools which states that trans children should be referred using any pronouns of their choice which could be “she / she”, “he / him” or options. non-binary of “they / their” or “ze / zir.” Consistent use of the wrong pronouns “could be considered harassment,” their paper adds.

Schools should have a list of “gender-neutral” school uniforms and trans children “have the right” to dress in the uniform that best suits them. Equaliteach goes further than Stonewall by telling schools that it is an “act of discrimination” to deny a child the use of a toilet that matches their gender identity, regardless of their biological sex.

They also say that there is “no duty to inform parents” if a child announces their new gender identity at school and add that the teacher must be careful not to “accidentally declare” the child to his parents as transgender.

In recent years, many schools have started implementing ‘gender neutral’ toilets and facilities, acting on the advice of groups who say this is ‘best practice’.

Richard Cairns, principal of Brighton College, which costs £ 43,650 a year, said there were “two or three kids at a time” in his school looking to switch to the opposite sex.

“We would always meet the parents and find reasonable ways to move forward and that benefits everyone,” he said.

“It all comes down to making adjustments to make a young person feel good about himself – the way he wears his hair, wears pants rather than a skirt, or sometimes he wishes he was in another house. there is not just any particular program, it is just a matter of treating a child as an individual “.

But some parents are “horrified” to learn how their children learn gender identity in school, according to Stephanie Davies-Arai, director of the Transgender Trend group which offers advice to families on the sex and gender of young people.

Gender neutral toilets

“We are increasingly contacted by parents who are really concerned about the rights of girls,” she said. “More and more schools are installing gender neutral toilets. Many parents contact us to say that their daughter refuses to go to the bathroom.

“There are also complaints about sports teams – when someone who is biologically male is allowed to compete with girls. Girls don’t feel like they can complain because they don’t want to be portrayed as fanatics, so it’s very difficult for them to express themselves.

Ms. Davies-Arai founded Transgender Trend in 2015 after worrying about the number of children in the care of schools and other institutions switching to the opposite sex.

She said the other big issue was the transition of children “behind their parents’ backs”, where schools do not inform families of the student’s new gender identity.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) was supposed to publish guidelines to help schools interpret the Equality Act 2010 and how it applies to trans students.

Lack of jurisprudence

But last year the guidelines – which would have forced girls’ schools to admit trans students – were struck down by the equality watchdog, accusing a “lack of definitive case law” on the issue.

The equality watchdog has now urged the government to “show leadership” and issue its own guidelines. “We recently wrote to the Education Ministry asking if they intended to do so and to offer our advice and support in the process if they decide to do so,” a spokesperson said. to the Telegraph.

A spokesperson for the DfE said: “Appropriately supporting all children in a school can involve balancing complex and sensitive issues, and schools are best placed to work with parents, students and public services. to determine the best approach. All students should be supported and treated with kindness and respect.


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Jersey City teenager charged with murder of 16-year-old https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/jersey-city-teenager-charged-with-murder-of-16-year-old/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 16:36:59 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/jersey-city-teenager-charged-with-murder-of-16-year-old/ JERSEY CITY – A teenager has surrendered to authorities and is charged with murder in connection with the recent death of a 16-year-old. According to Hudson County Prosecutor Esther Suarez, the 17-year-old suspect from Jersey City, who has not been named by authorities, surrendered to homicide detectives on Monday. The man, whom authorities were seeking […]]]>

JERSEY CITY – A teenager has surrendered to authorities and is charged with murder in connection with the recent death of a 16-year-old.

According to Hudson County Prosecutor Esther Suarez, the 17-year-old suspect from Jersey City, who has not been named by authorities, surrendered to homicide detectives on Monday.

The man, whom authorities were seeking in connection with the death, was arrested without incident and charged with murder, possession of a weapon for illegal purposes and illegal possession of a weapon.

Authorities say Pedro Rodriguez was shot dead on Communipaw Avenue on December 16. Authorities were alerted to the scene at around 11:45 a.m. and found Rodriguez unconscious with apparent gunshot wounds.

Rodriguez was pronounced dead at the scene around 12 p.m.

The accused will be returned to Morris County Juvenile Detention Center pending an initial court appearance.

Contact reporter Dino Flammia at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com.

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of the most infamous crimes in history took place – and what they are used for today. (If they remained standing.)

New Jersey residents charged in January 6 riot on Capitol Hill

More than a dozen people from New Jersey have been charged with involvement in the Jan.6 uprising on the United States Capitol.


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Be aware of the new laws as of January 1, 2022 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/be-aware-of-the-new-laws-as-of-january-1-2022/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 16:56:28 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/be-aware-of-the-new-laws-as-of-january-1-2022/ ESSEX, CHESTER, DEEP RIVER, CT – State Representative Christine Palm informs the community of the new laws that will come into effect on January 1, 2022: “Dear neighbour, In addition to marking the start of a new year, January 1 also marks the enactment of new laws in our state. Keep in mind that some […]]]>

ESSEX, CHESTER, DEEP RIVER, CT – State Representative Christine Palm informs the community of the new laws that will come into effect on January 1, 2022:

“Dear neighbour,

In addition to marking the start of a new year, January 1 also marks the enactment of new laws in our state. Keep in mind that some laws passed in 2021 will not come into effect until later in the year or in 2023, for example recreational cannabis. Below, I’ve rounded up a few that will go into effect on the first of the year that I think will be of interest to you.

Paid family and medical leave program
Connecticut’s Paid Family Leave and Medical Leave program will begin accepting claims for qualifying events, such as the birth or adoption of a child, illness of a family member or caregiver. even, as of January 1.
Under the program, adopted by the legislature in 2019, eligible workers will be able to be absent from work for up to 12 weeks without losing income. This money comes from a pool created by a half percent payroll deduction, and the combined power of this pool will mean people will no longer be forced to choose between work or health.
Connecticut is only the eighth state in the country to adopt a paid family and medical leave program. Currently, only 13% of private sector workers in the United States have access to paid family and medical leave.

The program is administered by the Connecticut Paid Leave Authority. Applications can be submitted from January 2022 through the ctpaidleave.org website or by email, fax, phone or post. The toll-free phone support line for applications is 877-499-8606.

Immunizations Act
While COVID-19 takes care of most of our health problems, it is not the only disease requiring vaccination. As of January 1, no religious exemption from state-imposed childhood vaccinations for students attending public and private schools (including higher education institutions) will be granted. As of January 1, all children entering school must be vaccinated against:

  • Diphtheria

  • Measles

  • Mumps

  • whooping cough

  • Poliomyelitis

  • Rubella

  • Tetanus

Exemptions submitted before April 28, 2021 for those who are enrolled in kindergarten or more, will benefit from acquired rights.

A law relating to the zoning law, secondary suites, the training of certain land use officials, municipal affordable housing plans and a commission on the development and future of Connecticut
The legislature has taken a much needed step by increasing the supply of affordable housing so that people such as students, retirees, empty nesters and municipal workers can afford to live in our district. From January 1, it will be allowed to build and rent to family tenants or other tenants in residential and single-family areas dwellings such as garage apartments, apartments for in-laws or “large -mothers ”, provided that they are adapted to the scale and architecture of the city.

An Act respecting a tax credit for employers who make payments on certain loans made to employees by the Connecticut Higher Education Supplemental Loan Authority
This law helps both the employer and the employee. With the rising costs of higher education and student debt, this law aims to encourage companies to support the financial well-being of their employees. This law provides tax relief to employers who make eligible student loan payments on behalf of a qualified employee. The maximum credit per employee per year of income is $ 2,625.

An Act respecting dental and vision insurance coverage for children, stepchildren and other dependent children
This law allows health, dental and vision insurance policies to be extended to children, stepchildren or dependents up to the age of 26. Previously, stepchildren and dependents were not always covered by this provision.

Connecticut Parentage Law
The Connecticut Parentage Act authorizes equal treatment under the law for same-sex couples by granting non-biological parents legal rights, regardless of the parents’ marital status, sex, or sexual orientation.

An Act respecting diabetes and high-deductible health plans
This new law makes vital insulin affordable. As of January 1, some health insurance policies must:

  • Expand coverage for diabetes screening, drugs and devices

  • Limit reimbursable expenses for drugs and covered devices related to diabetes

  • Cover drugs and emergency devices related to diabetes prescribed and dispensed by a pharmacist under the provisions of this Act

An Act respecting the use of force by a peace officer
Starting in the new year, new provisions will limit the circumstances in which a law enforcement officer can use lethal physical force, as well as the cases in which officers can use strangles. The General Assembly made these changes in 2020 following the death of George Floyd, and a compromise was reached with Connecticut law enforcement to defer implementation of these provisions until 2022 so that agents have more time to receive training on them.

An Act Respecting Discrimination in Insurance Against Living Organ Donors and Establishing an Advisory Committee on Chronic Kidney Diseases
Living organ donors offer the gift of life to those waiting on the transplant list, but often face higher insurance premiums or denial of coverage following the donation. With so much waiting for a transplant, we must work to increase the number of living organ donors. This law does exactly that by prohibiting insurers from discriminating against living organ donors.

For a full list of laws coming into effect on January 1, CLICK HERE.

Please feel free to email me at Christine.Palm@cga.ct.gov with any questions or concerns.

Truly,

Christine palm
State representative “

This article originally appeared on the Essex-Chester-Deep River patch


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Top 10 Adelaide Home Sellers for 2021 Revealed https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/top-10-adelaide-home-sellers-for-2021-revealed/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 06:14:09 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/top-10-adelaide-home-sellers-for-2021-revealed/ Homes near one of Adelaide’s most desirable suburbs make the list, and one is the biggest sale of all. Stunning homes, enthusiastic buyers and breathtaking deals – this was the perfect year for real estate in Adelaide. A four-bedroom home in one of the city’s most desirable suburbs, a beachfront mega-mansion, and a timeless villa […]]]>

Homes near one of Adelaide’s most desirable suburbs make the list, and one is the biggest sale of all.

Stunning homes, enthusiastic buyers and breathtaking deals – this was the perfect year for real estate in Adelaide.

A four-bedroom home in one of the city’s most desirable suburbs, a beachfront mega-mansion, and a timeless villa are among the top 10 home sellers for 2021.

According to the latest data released by realestate.com.au, which only took into account homes listed on its website and whose sale prices were disclosed, six homes each sold for over $ 4 million. .

Located on a leafy promenade in St Georges, 23 Wootoona Tce sold for a verified amount of $ 6,080,000, making it the most expensive house purchased in Adelaide in 2021 under these criteria.

The four-bedroom, two-story house, built on a large plot of 3,773m², was sold by Brett Pilgrim and Leon Yuan of Harcourts Pilgrim in October of this year.

“The house is in a highly desirable residential area and given the high demand and low inventory, we are not surprised that it sold out quickly, and for that amount,” Mr. Yuan said.

Proximity to major private schools, Yuan said, continues to be a deciding factor for sales in the region as well as those in neighboring suburbs.

This particular location appears to have attracted cash buyers, with the neighboring house at 25 Wootoona Tce being sold for a verified amount of $ 4,108,888. It is also the fifth most expensive home sale of the year, according to realestate.com.au.

The second highest verified sale is for a luxury oceanfront mansion. According to realestate.com.au, 34 South Esplanade in Glenelg South sold for a verified amount of $ 5,100,000.

Allan Real Estate Director Brad Allan, who sold the property with Zoe Murray, said real estate growth in Adelaide has indeed been exceptional this year.

“It must have been a slow year for real estate in Adelaide, but it was exactly the opposite,” Mr. Allan said.

“Instead of a slowdown, we’ve seen 20% growth and I doubt 2022 will see prices come down, just yet.”

While beachfront homes have always been in demand, the majority of properties topping this year’s premium price list are in the downtown suburbs.

Among them is a classic villa in Kensington Park. According to realestate.com.au, this is the third most expensive home sold for a verified sale of $ 4,500,000. This five bedroom boutique house at 382 The Parade benefits from custom renovations “including substantial landscaping”.

Soaring house prices in Adelaide have been in the news all this year. A mansion in Medindie sold at eight figures, but did not make this bestseller list as the final price was not disclosed to realestate.com.au.

According to John Williams of Williams Real Estate, who has led “many multi-million dollar sales this year,” sellers are pretty discreet about disclosing the final sale price.

“They like to keep the sale private and we respect that. We sold five homes last week for prices over $ 5 million, but we did not disclose it, ”said Williams.

Two homes sold by him and his wife Stephanie Williams are among the best sellers of the year.

According to realestate.com.au, the sixth place in the bagging is 17 Andrew Ave in Millswood, which sold for a verified amount of $ 4,050,000, while 10 Porter Street in Parkside, in ninth place. , saw buyers shell out $ 3,700,000 for the home.

When it comes to real estate growth, the pandemic, experts say, has not slowed sales.

On the contrary, lockdowns or the idea of ​​isolating themselves at home have driven South Australians to buy larger estates and invest in spacious homes.

“As travel abroad becomes more and more difficult, people want bigger and better homes to spend time on. This has resulted in increased demand for luxury properties,” said Williams.

The list of the 10 best house sales for 2021 *:

Address, Price

1. 23 Wootoona Tce, St Georges – $ 6,080,000

2. 34 Esplanade Sud, Glenelg Sud – $ 5,100,000

3. 382 La Parade, Kensington Park – $ 4,500,000

4. 225 Esplanade, Henley Beach – $ 4,125,000

5. 25 Wootoona Tce, St Georges – $ 4,108,888

6. 17 Andrew Ave, Millswood – $ 4,050,000

seven. 10 Taminga Ave, Glenunga – $ 3,975,000

8. 6 Farrell St, Glenelg South – $ 3,720,000

9. 10 Porter Street, Parkside – $ 3,700,000

ten. 19, promenade Travers, Beaumont – $ 3,700,000

*Based on realestate.com.au listings with disclosed selling prices.

Originally posted under the title Top 10 Adelaide Home Sellers for 2021 Revealed

Read related topics:Adelaide


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USDA Distributes $ 1.5 Billion To Boost School Lunch Program | News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/usda-distributes-1-5-billion-to-boost-school-lunch-program-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 01:42:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/usda-distributes-1-5-billion-to-boost-school-lunch-program-news/ U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the Biden-Harris administration will provide up to $ 1.5 billion to states and school districts to help school meal program operators meet the challenges of supply chain disruptions caused by the pandemic. With funding made available through the USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation, USDA will provide schools with $ […]]]>

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the Biden-Harris administration will provide up to $ 1.5 billion to states and school districts to help school meal program operators meet the challenges of supply chain disruptions caused by the pandemic.

With funding made available through the USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation, USDA will provide schools with $ 1 billion to purchase food for their meal programs and an additional $ 300 million to states to purchase food. food to distribute to schools. An additional $ 200 million will be used for cooperative agreements to purchase local food for schools, with an emphasis on purchasing from historically underserved producers. A state-by-state breakdown of funds can be found in a table at fns.usda.gov/cn/supply-chain-assistance-for-schools.

“USDA’s school meal programs have a tremendous impact on the health and well-being of children in our country,” said Vilsack. “Now, more than ever, American children need access to safe, nutritious food and our school nutrition professionals play a huge role in making that happen.”

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, school districts have faced extraordinary challenges in ensuring that every child has the food they need to learn, grow and thrive, a statement from the Vilsack office said.

“The food and funds that USDA is distributing will help ensure that schools have the resources they need to continue serving our nation’s school children with quality food they can count on, while building a stronger food system. strong, fairer and more competitive, “the statement read.

Supply Chain Assistance Fund

The USDA Food and Nutrition Service provides $ 1 billion to states in cash payments – known as the Supply Chain Assistance Fund – that school districts can use to purchase food for their school meal programs. These funds directly alleviate persistent supply chain problems and improve the quality and consistency of school meals for children in communities facing disruption, making it easier for schools to manage successful meal programs.

In total, supply chain assistance funds are expected to increase the resources of up to 100,000 schools in all 50 states, DC, Puerto Rico, Guam and the US Virgin Islands, including public, tribal, chartered and private not-for-profit schools. as well as residential childcare institutions.

Supply Chain Assistance funding can be used by school districts to purchase national unprocessed and minimally processed foods such as fresh fruit, milk, cheese, frozen vegetables and ground meat.

Local food for schools

As part of the Agricultural Marketing Service’s new Local Food for Schools Cooperation Agreement program, USDA will allocate up to $ 200 million to states for the purchase of local foods for use in the community. distribution in schools.

“This program will strengthen the school food system by helping to build a fair, competitive and resilient local food chain and expanding local and regional markets with an emphasis on purchasing from historically underserved producers and processors,” indicates the press release.

USDA Food Purchases

The USDA will also purchase approximately $ 300 million worth of 100% domestically grown and manufactured food items, known as USDA Foods, which states will distribute to schools to offset the impact of disruptions to their supply chains. normal supply. By conducting market research and working with qualified USDA suppliers large and small, USDA has identified a long list of available products. States will be able to order these additional foods in the coming weeks, with deliveries expected to take place as soon as possible.

To learn more, visit usda.gov.

Oracle acquires Cerner


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Attempted Murder in Bainbridge https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/attempted-murder-in-bainbridge/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 07:12:56 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/attempted-murder-in-bainbridge/ New York State Police said a Chenango County man was facing multiple felony charges, including attempted murder in an assault that seriously injured another person. On Sunday, December 19, Troopers announced that they were looking for Charles Richter, 46, of Bainbridge, who was last seen at his Kirby Lane home following a report of a […]]]>

New York State Police said a Chenango County man was facing multiple felony charges, including attempted murder in an assault that seriously injured another person.

On Sunday, December 19, Troopers announced that they were looking for Charles Richter, 46, of Bainbridge, who was last seen at his Kirby Lane home following a report of a marital dispute.

Authorities say a victim of the dispute was taken to Wilson Memorial Regional Medical Center in Johnson City with serious but not life-threatening injuries.

State Police assured the public that the incident was an isolated event and that Richter was not considered a threat, but still warned people not to approach the man if they saw him.

An area of ​​Route 7 around Kirby Lane was closed as police investigated.

Investigators then released an update indicating that Richter had been located and is charged with the offenses of attempted murder, assault, criminal contempt and unlawful imprisonment.

National police said the investigation was continuing.

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of the most infamous crimes in history took place – and what they are used for today. (If they remained standing.)

TOP 10: Best Holiday Specials Ever, Ranked

The best post-retirement jobs to earn you extra cash


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Council to hold public hearing Monday on redevelopment plan for former Speeds Automotive | News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/council-to-hold-public-hearing-monday-on-redevelopment-plan-for-former-speeds-automotive-news/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/council-to-hold-public-hearing-monday-on-redevelopment-plan-for-former-speeds-automotive-news/ CADILLAC – Cadillac City Council will be holding several public hearings on Monday. Three of the hearings will focus on a redevelopment plan for an obsolete property on Mitchell Street; two will relate to proposed changes to the city’s ordinances on medical and recreational marijuana; and another testament for an extension of tax linked to […]]]>

CADILLAC – Cadillac City Council will be holding several public hearings on Monday.

Three of the hearings will focus on a redevelopment plan for an obsolete property on Mitchell Street; two will relate to proposed changes to the city’s ordinances on medical and recreational marijuana; and another testament for an extension of tax linked to the remediation of contaminated groundwater in the industrial park.

Automobile Speeds Project

According to council documents, Lee Richards and Elizabeth Schnettner own and are redeveloping the former Speeds Automotive property and adjacent property into a mixed-use residential / commercial project.

The development is currently planned to have 14 apartments totaling 8,828 square feet and commercial / retail space totaling 5,000 square feet. The estimated private investment in development is $ 2,994,532.

Because the income from rental income is not sufficient to cover the costs of rebuilding the building, in addition to the level of operating costs, the project will only be able to continue if the economic development tools and incentives available to the city ​​are used.

To help with the redevelopment, council will consider approving a brownfield tax increase funding plan and a local tax abatement under the Obsolete Property Rehabilitation Act.

According to council documents, the brownfield plan was prepared to facilitate development by reimbursing the costs of lead and asbestos abatement, demolition and infrastructure through the capture of increased taxes generated by the private investment. The costs of eligible activities are estimated at $ 386,036.

The project also includes an OPRA tax allowance which will freeze the value of the building for local taxes for 12 years but provide for the collection of state taxes to reimburse eligible brownfield activities. The OPRA was used for the redevelopment of the Cobbs-Mitchell building and is comparable to the Commercial Redevelopment Act and Commercial Rehabilitation Act rebates that were established and previously used on other projects in the city, say the officials. board documents.

Marijuana Ordinance Amendments

Last month, the council voted to remove some restrictions on marijuana manufacturing facilities in areas of the city zoned for general industry and light industry.

Council subsequently voted to hold public hearings to discuss changes to ordinances establishing distance regulations for these facilities.

Cadillac city manager Marcus Peccia said the Cadillac Planning Commission unanimously approved recommendations that such facilities should not be built in close proximity to public or private schools.

Since arbitrary distance requirements – like not allowing establishments to operate within 1,000 or 500 feet of a school, for example – are not imposed on Cadillac’s other industries, Peccia said he doesn’t it would not be appropriate to impose such restrictions on marijuana.

Council will hear public comments on the planning commission’s recommendation not to build such facilities in close proximity to schools.

TIFA extension

For 30 years, the town of Cadillac has diverted tax revenues from Harry Janderjagt Industrial Park for cleanup efforts after various contaminants from industrial activities were discovered years earlier in the groundwater supply.

According to the plan approved by the council in 1991, “The city established the (Local Development Finance Authority) for the purpose of acquiring, constructing, installing and equipping a groundwater treatment plant in order to provide water to the district and simultaneously to decontaminate groundwater. found on adjacent plots of land and close to the district, thus making the rest of the property in the district susceptible to development.

The tax hike funding plan that was approved in 1991 expires this year and earlier this month Cadillac city council voted in favor of a public hearing to extend it for two years.

Cadillac City manager Marcus Peccia said previous estimates predicted it would be another two or three decades before cleanup efforts can be completed, although they currently do not have a specific timeline.

“It just takes time,” said Peccia, who added that “significant achievements” have been made in cleaning up groundwater over the past 30 years; he said a pending analysis of groundwater should paint a more accurate picture of how long work will need to be continued.

Cadillac City Council meets Monday at 6 p.m. at the Cadillac Municipal Complex, located at 200 North Lake Street.


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