Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:27:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Governor Ducey signs the state’s $18 billion budget for fiscal year 2023 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/governor-ducey-signs-the-states-18-billion-budget-for-fiscal-year-2023/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:27:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/governor-ducey-signs-the-states-18-billion-budget-for-fiscal-year-2023/ TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN) — Governor Doug Ducey signed Arizona’s fiscal year 2023 budget on Tuesday after state lawmakers approved the bipartisan $18 billion budget bill last week. Governor Ducey called the budget “a responsible package that pays down debt, secures our future, and lays the foundation for even greater growth, while investing in the areas […]]]>

TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN) — Governor Doug Ducey signed Arizona’s fiscal year 2023 budget on Tuesday after state lawmakers approved the bipartisan $18 billion budget bill last week.

Governor Ducey called the budget “a responsible package that pays down debt, secures our future, and lays the foundation for even greater growth, while investing in the areas that matter most to Arizonans.”

The biggest expense in the new budget is $1.15 billion to pay public safety pensions. The state says this is the first time pension plans for public safety personnel have been fully funded since 2004.

The governor’s office budget breakdown lists spending by category: education, public safety, health and welfare, natural resources, and infrastructure.

Education

  • $330.5 million to completely eliminate the State Equalization Tax Rate (SETR), a statewide tax currently applied to personal property to fund K-12 education Year, and Fill Property Tax Revenue Losses in K-12 with General Fund Support: The Largest Single Education Expenditure in This Budget Signed by Governor Ducey
  • $329 million to increase Basic Support Level education spending, the largest dollar and percentage increase in per-pupil funding in 20 years
  • $183.3 million to maintain school facilities through Building Renovation Grants, the largest building renovation investment in the program’s history
  • $126 million to continue supporting new economy initiatives at Arizona public universities
  • $100 million in special education funding for Arizona public schools
  • $50 million in ongoing funding for school safety, supporting the salaries of school resource officers
  • $20 million for the School Safety Interoperability Program, which provides funding to county sheriffs for real-time communication solutions between schools and public safety agencies in the event of an emergency
  • $16.6 million in adult education programs that provide continuing education programs at the high school and workforce levels
  • $12.5 million to expand Promise Scholarship program at Arizona universities
  • $10.8 million to restore STEM education funding levels for Pima and Maricopa Community Colleges
  • $10 million to scrap graduate school tuition for spouses of veterans
  • $10 million to help build and operate East Valley Institute of Technology’s Transitional Housing Program for Youth in Foster Care
  • $7 million in funding for rural community colleges

public safety

  • Deposit of $564.2 million in the Border Security Fund for enhanced patrols, physical barriers, detention and prosecution.
    • $53.4 million allocated to Arizona County Sheriffs to recruit and retain vital law enforcement personnel
    • $30 million for local prosecutions and imprisonment of individuals accused of drug trafficking, human smuggling, illegal immigration and other border-related crimes.
    • $20 million is in ongoing funding to support the Border Strike Task Force
  • $132.8 million to replace evaporative cooling with air-conditioned units in all state prisons over 4 years
  • $117 million to provide a 20% wage increase for all Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation salaries
  • $50.9 million to support infrastructure needs for the Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation statewide, which will improve safety for staff and inmates
  • $25 million for a 15% pay raise for Department of Public Safety law enforcement professionals
  • $10 million to launch a statewide cybersecurity readiness grant program and provide cybersecurity tools to local governments and school districts
  • $5 million in 20% pay raises for Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections officers.
  • $10 million to establish the Major Incidents Division at the Department of Public Safety that can investigate critical force incidents
  • $6.3 million to establish a First Responder Academy in Cochise County
  • $3.8 million to automate crime victim notifications allowing for better coordination and communication between law enforcement and crime victims

health and wellbeing

  • $94 million to address health worker shortages
    • $50 million in competitive grants for community colleges and universities looking to expand their nursing programs
    • $27 million for more clinical rotations needed to complete nurse training
    • $15 million for a nursing education investment partnership between hospitals and nursing education programs to increase the number of classroom spaces for the profession
    • $2 million for a new behavioral health student loan repayment program
  • $80.9 million for rate increases for providers serving people with developmental disabilities or who are elderly and physically disabled. Combined with the federal counterpart, the total investment is $281.2 million
  • $72.7 million for various housing strategies to reduce homelessness
    • Deposit of $60 million in the Housing Trust Fund
    • $10 million for pilot grant program for homeless services
    • $2.4 million for housing homeless veterans at Fort Whipple
  • $25 million to build five new secure residential behavioral health facilities
  • $11.2 million to add 95 more staff to Adult Protective Services to improve coverage for referrals of abuse or neglect of older adults or vulnerable adults
  • $16 million for expanded covered services in AHCCCS
    • $10 million to improve access to pregnancy care services by achieving parity with private providers
    • $2.7 million to provide coverage for women who are less than a year postpartum and do not exceed 150% of the federal poverty level
  • $10 million expands the Healthy Families program by 25% or approximately 1,500 families
  • $4.8 million to increase the daily foster care allowance, directly supporting children, the first increase since 2009
  • Investing $3 million in Regional Agencies for Aging Services that help maintain the independence of Arizona seniors by providing in-home services such as meal delivery

Natural resources

  • $176.7 million in federal and state resources, the largest investment in state history, to boost rural tourism through 33 state park system projects, which include campground upgrades, renovation of historic structures, improving physical and digital access to the parks system and more
  • $65 million in firefighting efforts, building on programs adopted at last year’s special session on fires
  • $41 million to protect Arizona lands through the Arizona Healthy Forest Initiative, $2.2 million of which will help advance the Good Neighbor Authority initiative, allowing the state to partner to federal agencies for forest thinning and other restoration projects in and around communities at risk of forest fire devastation
  • $10 million for grants to aid water projects in eastern Arizona
  • $5 million to remove salt cedars that threaten Arizona’s rivers and waterways
  • $3 million over two years to develop rules for direct drinking water reuse that will pave the way for additional water reuse across the state

Infrastructure

  • $1.045 billion in total strategic transportation initiatives, largest investment in state history
    • $875 million representing 44 transportation projects and initiatives across the state
    • $400 million to bring the state’s total commitment to the Interstate 10 expansion to $540 million, which will cover 20 miles of the 25-mile segment and replace the Gila River Bridge. This investment will further position the state to receive federal funds to fully fund the aforementioned 25-mile segment between Phoenix and Casa Grande.
    • Deposited $50 million in the newly created State Match Advantage for Rural Transportation (SMART) fund to help communities outside the urban cores of Maricopa and Pima counties and the Arizona Department of Transportation compete for federal transportation grants to improve the state’s transportation system
    • Deposited $20 million in aviation fund to support airport infrastructure statewide

Additional expenses

  • $425 million to bring the Rainy Day Fund to its highest amount: $1.4 billion
  • $93.5 million in state building debt repayment
  • $73.5 million in federal funds to replace the state’s old Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund computer system, which will improve efficiency and reduce fraud
  • $49.1 million for a general wage increase for state employees
  • $15 million to further develop the Business One-Stop project, which will provide individuals and businesses with a single portal to interact with the multiple agencies needed to start and maintain a business

——-
Anne Simmons is a digital content producer for KGUN 9. Anne made her television debut while still a student at the University of Arizona. Prior to joining KGUN, she managed several public access television stations in the Bay Area and worked as a video producer in the nonprofit sector. Share your story ideas and important issues with Anne via email anne.simmons@kgun9.com or by connecting to Instagram or LinkedIn.

]]>
4 proposed residential developments in New Carlisle to bring nearly 1,700 new homes https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/4-proposed-residential-developments-in-new-carlisle-to-bring-nearly-1700-new-homes/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 13:25:38 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/4-proposed-residential-developments-in-new-carlisle-to-bring-nearly-1700-new-homes/ The developments are proposed on a set of 586 acres. The City of New Carlisle foresees the potential for four new residential developments that could bring nearly 1,700 new homes to the city. MARK FREISTEDT The City of New Carlisle foresees the potential for four new residential developments that could bring nearly 1,700 new homes […]]]>

The developments are proposed on a set of 586 acres.

The City of New Carlisle foresees the potential for four new residential developments that could bring nearly 1,700 new homes to the city. MARK FREISTEDT

The City of New Carlisle foresees the potential for four new residential developments that could bring nearly 1,700 new homes to the city. MARK FREISTEDT

DDC Management has a purchase agreement for a 115-acre farm in Miami County where it plans to build 298 single-family homes. If approved, the new community would be at 8805 E. New Carlisle Road at the corner of Scarff Road, which is on the Miami County line and adjacent to the Clark County line.

The cost of the houses will start at around $250,000. All of the land would be annexed to Miami County, according to the proposal.

DDC Management has contacted the Miami County Engineer’s Office to inquire about annexing the land in New Carlilse, Miami County Administrator Charlotte Colley said. However, an annexation proposal has not been formally submitted and the process has not been initiated.

Bridge said no formal documents were submitted to start the annexation process, but the developer submitted a land review which was approved in March.

“We are not sure of the final plan. There was a review of the preliminary plan, but the planning board had concerns about the density and width of the lots,” he said. “(The planning board) has presented concerns and recommendations, and (the developer) is coming back to resubmit the preliminary plan.”

Before the New Carlisle City Council takes action on the plan, the developer must go through the annexation process in Miami County. Once this process has been initiated in Miami County, the New Carlisle Council should then pass a resolution indicating the services the city can provide.

ExplorePrevious: Proposed plan for 300 new homes in New Carlisle

Bridge said no proposals have been made to council and the annexation or services agreement has yet to pass. He said the council is working with Bethel Twp. draft and approve the annexation agreement.

As for the next steps regarding this development, Bridge said they are still talking about financing, zoning and final approval of the dish.

“We’re still a bit far from anything formal because of the legislative processes we have to go through,” he said.

A joint business meeting with the New Carlisle City Council and Bethel Twp., the Miami County Board of Directors, was held to discuss potential annexation and development.

Bethel Township. Administrator Don Black said the township opposed annexation. He said the township had lost 1,030 acres to annexation since 1988, or 5% of the township.

New Carlisle does not have to enter into an annexation agreement with Bethel Twp. for this annexation to happen. However, reaching an agreement is a way for the township to have a limited contribution to the annexation and development of the property.

Black added that school district boundaries will not change and children who attend Bethel High School will continue to do so.

New Carlisle Planning Director Derek Hutchinson said if the annexation goes through, the only thing that will change is that it will be considered New Carlisle and use city utilities.

“I want to do what I think the citizens would want, which is best for the city in terms of the tax base, which will bring a better future to the city of New Carlisle or be able to move the city in the right direction to bring in new business,” said New Carlisle Mayor Mike Lowrey.

The first stages of the plan for this development of nearly 300 homes began in February.

Opponents of this additional housing say it will cause an increase in population which will drain resources and impact schools.

Residents of Clark and Miami counties have expressed concerns about the proposed project.

ExplorePrevious: New Carlisle housing development project site already sold

Jason Layton, who lives on New Carlisle Road near the proposed housing site, said he was concerned that additional housing would cause additional traffic and result in an influx of students into the local Bethel School District.

Layton opposes the project and said a few key points residents have about the new site are the occupancy of children from new schools in the area, the impact on traffic, and the environmental impact on Silver Lake.

“Bethel and many New Carlisle residents remain strongly opposed to annexation and development. This is not good for Bethel School and we township residents do not want the additional traffic or impact environment on Silver Lake,” he said.

The Silver Lake property is owned by Jeff Morford and his family of over 35 members. He said the property is about 100 acres with 17 lake acres, and is one of less than 120 naturally formed lakes in Ohio that have existed for 10,000 years.

“I am and always will be against the 300 home development plans that DDC plans to build in Scarff and Lake due to habitat and environmental concerns for the Honey Creek corridor,” he said. “In my mind, new residents and voters can change the fiber of New Carlisle.”

While Morford continues to oppose the development and suggests leaving it agricultural, he has secured signatures from residents against it. He said he went door to door and moved into a local church and got 117 residents to sign against the development.

700 new housing units offered.

Arbor Homes proposed an 83-acre site in Bethel Twp., Clark County to build 300 single-family homes. The vacant land should be annexed, but not across county lines, Bridge said. If approved, the new community would be in Addison Carlisle Road, north of the Northwoods subdivision.

The proposed layout would include 12 floor plans; six or more elevation styles per floor plan; structural options, including basement, sunrooms and room extensions; interior options such as gourmet kitchen and luxury master bathrooms; vinyl siding; and masonry, according to the plan.

The other development is proposed by DR Horton to build 400 single-family homes on the 145-acre Brubaker farm property on the east side of 235, north of the Chrysler dealership.

The developer had a concept plan that it presented earlier this month, but due to the floodplain and the studies it has done, it had to reorganize it.

ExploreRelated: New Carlisle Ranked 2nd in Ohio for Healthiest Housing Market

Hutchinson said this development is unique because the developer plans to leave space near Ohio 235 for business purposes.

This project does not have a timeline indicating when the developers will submit their plan.

Fourth proposed development

A potential fourth development was proposed by a 200-acre private landowner and the 43-acre Clark County Land Bank to build 700 single-family homes that would be north of Twin Creek. The project does not yet have a developer and no concept plan has been drawn up.

Revenue from these homes will go directly into existing neighborhoods and infrastructure to fix streets and do more projects, Bridge said.

“We hope that the legislative bodies are receptive to the excellent work that the administration has brought to them,” he said.

City welcoming to projects

Hutchinson said the city didn’t pursue these developments, owners and developers came to see them. He said that once a property owner and developer wants to work with them, they will welcome concept plans and ideas on how to secure residential and commercial properties.

“This is just the beginning. There are going to be many years to follow with improvement and growth, commercially and residentially. The benefits to the community are going to be enormous,” he said. getting it right and making sure that’s an advantage.”

New Carlisle has a population of 5,559 in 2,086 households. Over the next 10 years with the four potential developments, the population is expected to increase by 4,414 people in 1,698 additional households, bringing the total to 9,973 people in 3,784 households by 2030.

New Carlisle has been named the second healthiest housing market in Ohio, according to an annual study of the Ohio housing market by SmartAsset.

SmartAsset is a fintech company, founded in 2012, focused on publishing articles, guides, reviews, calculators, and tools to help people make decisions about their personal finances. The study surveyed cities and towns by assessing homeownership and housing market factors, such as the number of years residents stay in the same house, the percentage of houses that decline in value, etc. .

“We didn’t know that we would be in this study like this… We had a lot of activity with some promoters interested in our city; we didn’t know where it came from, and then suddenly we were informed that this article was published with the rating criteria; and everything made sense to us in that moment,” Bridge previously said.

Bridge assigned the high ranking in the survey to residents of the city, as the rating was measured by metrics such as the number of years residents have been in their homes and the risk of the homes losing value. He said that means people want to stay in the city.

Bridge, who has served as city manager since 2015, said he has worked hard to bring about positive change, including getting the finances in order, fixing the streets and pumping money into parks.

“You need all of these foundations, so people want to stay here and move into your town. I think people are starting to notice that New Carlisle is changing, becoming a desirable destination to live in,” he said.

]]>
Pope Francis’ visit to Canada will include a stop at the former Alberta boarding school https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/pope-francis-visit-to-canada-will-include-a-stop-at-the-former-alberta-boarding-school/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 16:23:25 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/pope-francis-visit-to-canada-will-include-a-stop-at-the-former-alberta-boarding-school/ Breadcrumb Links National Author of the article: The Canadian Press Kelly Geraldine Malone Pope Francis arrives to attend his weekly general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, June 22, 2022. The Vatican has released the schedule for Pope Francis’ visit to Canada next month, which includes a visit to the site of […]]]>

Content of the article

The Vatican has released the program for the Pope’s visit to Canada next month, which includes visiting the site of a former Alberta boarding school with survivors of the institutions.

Advertisement 2

Content of the article

The papal visit is scheduled to begin in Edmonton on July 24 and end in Iqaluit on July 29. It will include public and private events emphasizing Aboriginal participation.

“We pray that this pilgrimage will be another meaningful step in the long journey of healing, reconciliation and hope,” said Archbishop Richard Smith of Edmonton, general coordinator of the papal visit to Canada.

Pope Francis is expected to apologize for the role of the Roman Catholic Church in residential schools during his trip to Canada.

On April 1, after several days of meetings with First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups at the Vatican, the Pope apologized for the deplorable conduct of Church members involved in residential schools.

Advertisement 3

Content of the article

Pope Francis is due to arrive in Edmonton on July 24 for a brief airport ceremony. The next day, he is expected to join the survivors of the Ermineskin Indian Residential School in the community of Maskwacis south of the city.

Ermineskin was one of the greatest institutions in Canada. Smith said he “will have a representative role for all boarding schools.” He anticipates that the apology will be made to the survivors of the school.

Later in the day, Francis is scheduled to visit the Church of the Sacred Heart of First Peoples, an aboriginal church in downtown Edmonton. The church was recently restored after a major fire in 2020.

The next day, Francis is scheduled to attend a mass at Commonwealth Stadium, home of the CFL’s Edmonton Elks football team. It is to be open to the public and the facility can hold around 65,000 people.

Advertisement 4

Content of the article

The pontiff must go to Lac Ste. Anne this evening where a great pilgrimage takes place every year.

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops said that due to the advanced age and limitations of the 85-year-old Pope, Francis will attend public events for about an hour.

The pope is then due to travel to Quebec City on July 27, where he is to meet Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Governor General Mary Simon. He is to have private meetings at The Citadel and deliver a public speech later.

The pontiff must then go to Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré on July 28 for a mass. Between 10,000 and 15,000 guests are expected.

The Canadian bishops said the public is also invited to a dedicated area during the Quebec leg of the trip to watch papal events on large screens and participate in Indigenous cultural events.

Advertisement 5

Content of the article

Pope Francis is due to meet with indigenous leaders in eastern Canada on July 29 before flying to Iqaluit. There, Francis will have a private meeting with residential school survivors before attending a public community event.

The pope’s priority during the visit is the relationship with indigenous peoples, Smith said, adding that the pontiff has heard the cry for reconciliation and the yearning for hope.

“It’s a leg of the journey,” Smith said. “But it’s a huge step that has huge associated positive possibilities to move this relationship in the right direction.”

Public events will be free, but the Canadian bishops said tickets will be needed and will be available in the coming days.

The release of the program comes amid fears the pontiff’s health could delay his trip to Canada. Earlier this month, a planned trip to Congo and South Sudan was canceled “so as not to jeopardize the results of the therapy he is undergoing for his knee”, the Vatican said.

Advertising 6

Content of the article

Francis uses a wheelchair and has difficulty walking and standing.

Smith said the Vatican’s release of the program should provide assurance that Pope Francis will come to Canada.

Bishop Raymond Poisson, president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, said they were working with all levels of government and Indigenous partners to address the logistical challenges of the trip and the pope’s health needs.

“We pray for the health of Pope Francis and also that his pastoral visit to Canada will bring reconciliation and hope to all who will accompany our shepherd on this historic journey,” Poisson said in a statement.

The Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program has a hotline to help survivors of residential schools and their loved ones suffering from trauma invoked by the memory of past abuse. The number is 1-866-925-4419.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on June 23, 2022.

Advertisement 1

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. See our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

]]>
Main Line Brands Acquires Fitness Equipment Technicians | New https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/main-line-brands-acquires-fitness-equipment-technicians-new/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/main-line-brands-acquires-fitness-equipment-technicians-new/ Addition of Fitness Machine Repair Company Expands Core Brands Commercial and Residential Service Franchise Portfolio HICKORY, North Carolina, June 21, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Main Line marksa parent company of several home service franchises, recently added Fitness Machine Technicians, a philadelphia creamto its portfolio of corporate brands. Fitness Machine Technicians specializes in the repair and maintenance […]]]>

Addition of Fitness Machine Repair Company Expands Core Brands Commercial and Residential Service Franchise Portfolio

HICKORY, North Carolina, June 21, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Main Line marksa parent company of several home service franchises, recently added Fitness Machine Technicians, a philadelphia creamto its portfolio of corporate brands.

Fitness Machine Technicians specializes in the repair and maintenance of fitness equipment for commercial and residential exercise facilities across United States and Canada. It provides exercise equipment services in fitness centers, businesses, hotels, condominiums, high schools, colleges and universities, government and residences.

“Fitness Machine Technicians is an emerging brand with a large following,” said the president and CEO of Main Line Brands. Chris Buitron. “This is a unique concept that provides an indispensable service to businesses and owners around the world. North America. We’re excited to add them to the core brand system.”

“We have experienced substantial franchise expansion over the past few years and believe our alignment with the Main Line brands can take our growth to another level,” said Fitness Machine Technicians President and CEO. Give powers. “We share Main Line Brands’ commitment to the customer and to providing excellent, reliable service at an affordable price. We believe this is an ideal relationship as we move forward and we are developing in the future.”

With 30 years of experience in the fitness industry, selling equipment, owning outlets and owning and managing fitness centers, Powers saw an opportunity to provide a needed service, business based only on the repair and maintenance of fitness equipment.

Fitness Machine Technicians sold its first franchise in 2012 before launching a national franchise campaign in 2018. The brand now has more than 50 franchises in the United States and Canadawith more than 100 active territories in 30 US states and three Canadian provinces.

Major Line marks now owns and operates three service-based franchises – Fitness Machine Technicians, Mosquito Authority and Pest Authority. Experience, knowledge and responsibility are the cornerstones of the three brands.

####

About the main brands

Major Line markssituated at Hickory, North Carolinais a parent company operating leading home service franchises Mosquito Authority, Pest Authority and Fitness Machine Technicians.

Susquehanna Private Capital invested in Main Line Brands in October 2020. Susquehanna Private Capital is one of the largest private financial services companies in the world. SPC invests in companies that will benefit from changing consumer preferences, increased complexity of business models and outsourcing trends.

The current Mosquito Authority and Pest Authority brands both operate with an affordable business model, with no commitments or annual contracts. Mosquito Authority was founded in 2002 and is the nation’s leading professional tick and mosquito control provider. Pest Authority specializes in commercial and residential pest control, rodents and termites.

The company has more than 700 franchise territories nationwide across all three brands.

About Fitness Equipment Technicians

Give powers founded professional fitness equipment service and repair company Exertech in 2002 and renamed it Fitness Machine Technicians in 2014. Canada.

Fitness Machine Technicians specializes in the maintenance and repair of fitness equipment for commercial and home exercise facilities. Customers include fitness centers, businesses, hotels, condominiums, high schools, colleges and universities, government and residences across United States and Canada. Its company-trained and certified technicians are committed to providing the most reliable repair and maintenance services.

Fitness Machine Technicians also offers franchise opportunities for people interested in fitness and wanting to run a service business based on a proven operating model. The company’s award-winning franchise currently has locations in approximately 100 territories across the United States and Canada.

For more information, visit http://www.FitnessMachineTechnicians.com or call 844-FMT-FIXX.

Media Contact

Kevin BehanMajor Brands, 919-459-3595, kbehan@919marketing.com

SOURCE Main Brands

]]>
Create world peace at home https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/create-world-peace-at-home/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 17:50:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/create-world-peace-at-home/ June 11, 2022 Passing Mount Airy Secondary School along North South Street, one notices the walls, sidewalks and signage of a typical educational institution – but one probably doesn’t realize that a thriving business lies also within its limits. On a recent morning at the Blue Bear Cafe as the school year drew to a […]]]>

Passing Mount Airy Secondary School along North South Street, one notices the walls, sidewalks and signage of a typical educational institution – but one probably doesn’t realize that a thriving business lies also within its limits.

On a recent morning at the Blue Bear Cafe as the school year drew to a close, senior Ocean Davis was putting the finishing touches on a fruit smoothie after serving cookies and brownies to a grateful recipient. Chances are another customer will soon order a cup of freshly brewed latte from the student-run business.

The coffee at the Blue Bear Cafe is reputed to be so good that teacher Ashley Pyles did not hesitate to compare what the children prepare to that offered by an international chain of cafes:

“They make the best coffee, hands down, on Starbucks every day,” Pyles said proudly.

In addition to a variety of coffees – including Frappé, Latte and Americano – there are several flavors of fruit smoothies, various sweet treats including bundt cakes, snacks, hot chocolate, cider and more Again.

The Blue Bear Cafe menu additionally includes specialty drinks featuring what has apparently become a local sensation, bubble teas.

Yet perhaps the best product served up there is success – cooked up daily by apron-wearing student entrepreneurs who gain valuable business experience during the school year that can help them in a career.

“It’s never about coffee,” said Polly Long, Workforce Initiatives Coordinator, when discussing the mission involved, or for that matter caffeine, the boosting ingredient in this popular drink. .

“It’s all about skills,” added Long, a longtime employee of the school system who gets a lot of credit for making the on-campus enterprise a reality.

“A student-run cafe has been Polly Long’s dream for years,” reads a statement prepared in conjunction with the Blue Bear Cafe program receiving special recognition from the municipal government at a recent council meeting. This statement also refers to the role that “extraordinarily talented students” played in its success.

The cafe, which started in 2019, aims to provide targeted youth with basic life skills training and create a pathway to employment in the service sector.

For example, junior Jennifer Griffin has her sights set on becoming a pastry chef.

The Blue Bear Cafe operates through the school’s Professional Studies Program Unit and is overseen by teachers Jennifer Gentry and Ashley Pyles in addition to Long.

“Jennifer is kind of our pastry chef,” Gentry said of Griffin’s inescapable role in the operation.

Approximately 10 students are enrolled in the program in any given academic year. They also attend regular classes in addition to working a set number of hours for coffee, constituting class periods. It is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. during school terms.

Student Innovators

The Blue Bear Cafe occupies a strategic space in the high school’s media center, which provides an inviting setting to enjoy a drink or snack that arguably rivals that of any cafe on the planet. The surroundings are pleasantly lit by large bay windows overlooking North South Street.

The place was fitted out with the help of Goodwill Industries, Long said, which helped provide start-up funds to acquire new furniture and fixtures.

It is tastefully decorated with walls painted in a light brown and olive green color scheme, printed with phrases such as “serve kindness a cup of time” and inspirational words such as “imagine”, “create”, ” inspire” and others.

The students respond by constantly adding new drinks and have even developed a website to promote the company. A Blue Bear Cafe Facebook page is available to facilitate ordering.

The school’s spotless kitchen is located in a side room, near a counter where students consult library materials as part of a harmonious dual existence between the two schools. A gift shop specializing in student-made products is also located at the cafe, offering items such as mugs and t-shirts and handcrafted items from local entrepreneurs.

In addition to the culinary skills honed by young people, other abilities are learned that they can apply to many other career endeavors besides a cafe itself.

These include leadership, communication, organizational skills and teamwork, as well as the actual duties of dealing with the public to take orders, give change from a cash register and process orders by credit card.

“They see it in real time,” Long said of the impression left on those in the outside world who can see education applied to real business. The students involved are a mix of upper and lower classes who provide a seamless transition with knowledge transfer as they come and go.

“They basically learn how to run a business on their own,” Pyles observed.

While the café is closed for the summer, before resuming operations with the start of the new school year, it has been popular with members of the public who can call in and take orders on campus.

In other cases, large orders will even be delivered to customers.

“We’re in the dark,” Long said of the cost of this service given soaring gas prices. “What we are trying to do is break even, with all profits going directly to the company.

“We use some of that money to take them (students) on field trips,” Gentry advised.

Long hopes to expand the Blue Bear Cafe to a downtown location if one can be found under the right circumstances.

City Honors

The whiff of Blue Bear Cafe’s success wafted from City Hall a few miles away, as evidenced by the special recognition it received at a recent meeting of the Mount Airy Board of Commissioners.

Pyles attended this session with two students, Griffin and fellow junior Shatavia Robison, who were there for a presentation on the program highlighted by the girls handing out chocolate chip cookies to those in attendance.

The cookies were contained in colorful wrappers with labels touting sentiments such as “be kind” and “choose happiness”.

“This program is all about our kids first and foremost,” Pyles said of the effort that “just blew my mind.”

“The Blue Bear Cafe is one of the shining lights of the Mount Airy school system,” remarked Commissioner Jon Cawley, while thanking Polly Long for her involvement.

“I know you will go far in life,” Commissioner Marie Wood told the students.

“Great job, ladies,” said Joe Zalescik of the board.

“That’s what a community like Mount Airy is and can be,” Mayor Ron Niland said of the cafe’s success.

]]>
Money Magazine names St. Olaf one of the “Best Colleges in the Midwest” – St. Olaf College https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/money-magazine-names-st-olaf-one-of-the-best-colleges-in-the-midwest-st-olaf-college/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:23:28 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/money-magazine-names-st-olaf-one-of-the-best-colleges-in-the-midwest-st-olaf-college/ Money magazine names St. Olaf one of the “Best Colleges in the Midwest” St. Olaf College was recognized as one of the best colleges in the Midwest—and the best college in Minnesota—by Silver magazine. Silver put St. Olaf at No. 7 in his 2022 Ranking of Best Colleges in the Midwestwhich are depending on a […]]]>

Money magazine names St. Olaf one of the “Best Colleges in the Midwest”

St. Olaf College was recognized as one of the best colleges in the Midwest—and the best college in Minnesota—by Silver magazine.

Silver put St. Olaf at No. 7 in his 2022 Ranking of Best Colleges in the Midwestwhich are depending on a variety of factors, including affordability, graduation rates, and average post-graduation earnings. The magazine recognized St. Olaf’s music department, a wide variety of majors, and a wide range of on-campus organizations and activities for students.

“We are honored to be recognized as one of Silver‘s Top 10 Schools in the Midwest,” says Chris George, Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at St. Olaf. “St. Olaf’s inclusion in a list of primarily important research institutions affirms everything that makes St. Olaf a great place for prospective students to consider.

St. Olaf College meets 100% of demonstrated need and 98% of students receive financial aid. While private schools are often seen as more expensive than public institutions, St. Olaf’s generous financial aid breaks that stereotype. The graduation rate at St. Olaf is around 86%, with average early-career earnings of $60,240.

“Our commitment to affordability offers students from all economic backgrounds the opportunity to participate in a rigorous academic experience within an inclusive and vibrant residential community that prepares them for success beyond the Hill,” said George.

St. Olaf earned high marks in other top college rankings this year, ranking in the Princeton Review’s Top 50 Best Value Collegesand entering at No. 62 on American News‘ list of top national liberal arts colleges.

]]>
Brooklyn Heights, a Historic Residential Enclave With Coveted Townhouses and Enviable Manhattan Views https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/brooklyn-heights-a-historic-residential-enclave-with-coveted-townhouses-and-enviable-manhattan-views/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 11:10:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/brooklyn-heights-a-historic-residential-enclave-with-coveted-townhouses-and-enviable-manhattan-views/ Brooklyn Heights has long been considered one of the most sought-after neighborhoods in the borough. With its historic townhouses, tree-lined blocks, and waterfront views overlooking Manhattan, it’s no wonder the neighborhood’s appeal has only grown over time. Its high concentration of antebellum homes and historic institutions made it the first neighborhood to receive protection under […]]]>


Brooklyn Heights has long been considered one of the most sought-after neighborhoods in the borough. With its historic townhouses, tree-lined blocks, and waterfront views overlooking Manhattan, it’s no wonder the neighborhood’s appeal has only grown over time. Its high concentration of antebellum homes and historic institutions made it the first neighborhood to receive protection under New York’s Landmarks Preservation Act of 1965 and in 1966 Brooklyn Heights was added to the National Register of Historic Places to preserve its uniqueness. while carefully welcoming new developments.

“Not only is it an incredibly beautiful neighborhood, but it’s also very historic, so some of Brooklyn’s oldest homes, if not the oldest, are in Brooklyn Heights,” said Lindsey Barton Barrett, associate realtor at Douglas. Elliman.

Because the neighborhood was developed quite early compared to some of its neighbors, such as Downtown Brooklyn and Dumbo, there is not much room left for new buildings to rise, however, a handful have slipped over some of the last remaining vacant plots. ground.

After: King’s Cross: its ongoing revival has made it a London hotspot

Borders

Brooklyn Heights is one of the first neighborhoods encountered when crossing the Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan. Its position along the East River gives way to direct views of lower Manhattan and is bounded by Old Fulton Street and the Brooklyn Bridge to the north, Cadman Plaza and Court Street to the east, Atlantic Avenue to the south and Furman Street, as well as the Brooklyn-Queens Freeway (BQE) to the west. Neighboring areas include Cobble Hill, Dumbo, Boerum Hill and Downtown Brooklyn.


Price scale

Prices here run the gamut, but it’s generally recognized as one of Brooklyn’s most expensive neighborhoods. The neighborhood’s median sale price is currently around $1.3 million, while the median monthly rent is $3,850, according to data from StreetEasy.

Brooklyn Heights is no stranger to record sales and rental prices. In May, a penthouse at 67 Livingston Street rented for a record $40,000 per month, just two days after hitting the market with a listing price of $30,000 per month. A five-story, $25.5 million brownstone at 8 Montague Terrace, sold in late 2020, set a new record for the most expensive home ever sold in the borough. A famous five-bedroom Brooklyn Heights brownstone at 19 Cranberry St., featured in the 1987 film “Moonstruck,” sold in May for a whopping $11 million.

Interior view of a five-story, four-bedroom Anglo-Italian townhouse in Brooklyn Heights. The property is currently listed for $6.59 million.

BROWN HARRIS STEVENS

After: Naples, Florida, offers abundant golf along the Gulf of Mexico

Housing stock

Low-rise cooperative buildings and townhouses make up the main composition of Brooklyn Heights, although several of the neighborhood’s historic high-rise buildings, such as 360 Furman St. (now known as One Brooklyn Bridge Park ) and the former Standish Arms Hotel, have been converted into luxury condo buildings over the past 10-15 years. In 2019, developers RAL Companies tapped architectural firm ODA New York to design Quay Tower, a 30-story residential tower along the waterfront at 50 Bridge Park Drive, bringing 126 condos to the neighborhood. Despite the increase in condo development, the townhouse market remains the area’s main attraction and continues to record high transaction volumes.

The growing demand and low supply of available housing ensures that available properties are quickly bought or rented, creating a certain level of difficulty for potential buyers and tenants.

“When things hit the market, they go very fast,” says real estate attorney Shaun Pappas, partner at Starr Associates. “This is a highly sought after area, so as lawyers we need to act extremely quickly on these transactions. You don’t get a two week contract negotiation when you negotiate something in Brooklyn Heights.

This six-bedroom, 6,200 square foot townhouse in Brooklyn Height features a modern interior and private parking. The house is currently asking for $10.5 million.

SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY


What makes it unique

Homes and institutions evoking architectural styles such as Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, Colonial Revival, Victorian Gothic, Renaissance Revival, and Queen Anne are all found in the neighborhood.

“It seems like one of the most coveted things in all of New York City is a Brooklyn brownstone, and Brooklyn Heights is filled with stately homes that are taller, on average, than homes in every other neighborhood in Brooklyn. and still offer stunning views,” explained Barton Barret.

Although the neighborhood is quiet and residential, it’s only a few minutes from Manhattan by subway, providing a small neighborhood feel with easy access to the city as a whole. Additionally, Brooklyn Heights is home to the Center for Brooklyn History, a nationally recognized urban history center in an iconic building designed by George Post, dedicated to preserving the borough’s history.

After: With grand historic mansions, excellent schools and a huge park, the 16th arrondissement of Paris is the ideal family base

Luxury amenities

Brooklyn Heights offers the luxury of enviable views of Manhattan from several hotspots, with the Brooklyn Heights Promenade – an 1,826-foot-long platform and cantilevered pedestrian walkway over the BQE – being the one of the most popular. There’s also Brooklyn Bridge Park, which is ambiguously considered part of Brooklyn Heights and offers 85 acres of waterfront outdoor space with six piers and a host of activity spaces ranging from a roller skating, pickleball and kayaking. ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina at Brooklyn Bridge Park offers anyone with a boat the ability to reserve any of its 102 berths for a fee.


New condo developments like Quay Tower offer a wide range of exclusive amenities that include fitness centers, children’s playrooms, concierge services and private rooftop spaces with pristine skyline views, among other benefits reserved for residents.

This five-bedroom townhouse in Brooklyn Heights features a rooftop terrace with panoramic views of the Lower Manhattan Skyline, East River, and Brooklyn Heights.

SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Who lives here

Over the years, the neighborhood has attracted more and more residents exploring their options outside of Manhattan. Many younger families have embraced the neighborhood, attracted by factors such as the wide selection of reputable private schools to choose from and the amount of space provided at its prices, compared to locations in Manhattan.

After: Bronte, a Sydney seaside suburb, offers laid-back living and luxury properties

Notable residents

Being one of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city, it’s no surprise that many celebrities call Brooklyn Heights home. One building in particular – The Standish, an early 1900s Beaux-Arts building converted into 29 luxury condos in 2016 – is home to a plethora of celebrities, including Matt Damon, who bought the 12th-floor penthouse for 16.75 million in late 2018. Actress Emily Blunt and her husband, John Krasinski, also own condos at the Standish, paying $11 million to combine two eighth-floor residences in 2018. Recently, famed architect Bjark Ingels purchased a penthouse in the historic St. George Tower Cooperative Building for $2.1 million.

In 2019, actress Michelle Williams bought a $10.8 million townhouse in Brooklyn Heights, and actor Adam Driver also owns a townhouse in the neighborhood. Other notable residents include singer Björk, actress Zendaya and actor Paul Giamatti.

After: Sammamish, a suburb of Seattle close to the city, but immersed in nature

Outlook

“Whether it’s older townhouses or newer condominiums, the supply of both is limited, so they will continue to appreciate over time,” said developer Robert Levine, Founder and CEO of RAL Companies. “Brooklyn Heights’ architecture isn’t going to change much either, as many of these historic buildings are iconic to ensure they stay true to their character and have strict guidelines in place for any potential restorations.”

With little room for new development and the timelessness of Brooklyn townhouses, prices are likely to continue to rise in Brooklyn Heights, attracting high net worth individuals and families looking to own or rent a piece of land. history while enjoying modern comfort. and those coveted views. New condominiums with top-notch amenities and services also help ensure that demand does not dry up for the foreseeable future.

Click for more profiles of upscale neighborhoods around the world

]]>
Two Houston-area educators recognized as transformational leaders https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/two-houston-area-educators-recognized-as-transformational-leaders/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 12:11:16 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/two-houston-area-educators-recognized-as-transformational-leaders/ Angela Martinez, vice-principal of Ellisor Elementary School, has been recognized as one of 26 Transformational Leaders by the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M University, Magnolia ISD announced. The event took place during the 2022 Dean’s Roundtable in May at the Hildebrand Equine Complex in College Station. Martinez was joined by superintendents, […]]]>

Angela Martinez, vice-principal of Ellisor Elementary School, has been recognized as one of 26 Transformational Leaders by the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M University, Magnolia ISD announced.

The event took place during the 2022 Dean’s Roundtable in May at the Hildebrand Equine Complex in College Station. Martinez was joined by superintendents, administrators, teachers, professors and other professionals like Spring ISD Schools Superintendent Lupita Hinojosa.

More than 700 educators have been honored by the Dean’s Roundtable since 1991, raising more than $500,000 to support college scholarships, programs, and initiatives.

“The Dean’s Roundtable sponsors elevate the achievement and dedication of those who encourage and inspire others to excel,” said Acting Dean of the College of Education and Human Development Michael A. de Miranda in the announcement on the district’s website. “This recognition serves as an indication of the college’s efforts to promote a culture of excellence and the ideals that we hope all Texas A&M graduates will follow.”

scholarship students

14 senior graduates received $23,000 from the Magnolia Education Foundation to help pay for their education during the Scholarship Nights event, Magnolia ISD announced on its website.

Funds of $30,000 have been awarded since the foundation launched the Senior Star Scholarship in 2019. Recipients are chosen based on academic achievement, community involvement and volunteer efforts.

Eight students who are children of Magnolia ISD employees received the Senior Star Scholarship: Austin Cheek, Jaiden Garcia, Christina Duke, Claire McCusker, Magnolia High; and Taylor Vance, Shelby Tope, Sawyer Swinford, Luke Thompson, Magnolia West.

“These scholarships allow MEF to recognize seniors who understand how special it is to have a parent in the MISD family,” Magnolia Education Foundation President Stacia Norris said in the announcement.

Six seniors have been awarded the first $2,500 Coach Morris Scholarship, named after teacher and coach Alex Morris, who died in 2019.

Jordan Dickson, Eailey Evertson, Ernie Mendoza, Vincinte Savage, Magnolia High; and Isabel Oviedo, Austin Hitchcock, Magnolia West.

For more information on Magnolia Education Foundation scholarships, visit www.magnoliaedfoundation.com/how-we-help/scholarships/.

Magnolia High student selected for prestigious jazz program

Aidan Clark of Magnolia High School was chosen to be part of the prestigious Jazz at Lincoln Center Summer Jazz Academy in July.

Summer Jazz Academy is a two-week residential institute for advanced jazz performance learning, Magnolia ISD explained in an online announcement. The program will run July 17-30 at Bard College in New York. The program is set up and taught by a team of teachers.

Clark is one of 42 students who will have the opportunity to participate in large groups, do small combos, receive private lessons and experience different types of classes. They will also participate in public performances.

Clark plays lead trombone in the Jazz Houston Youth Orchestra and is the first student in the history of the Magnolia ISD band program to be part of the Texas All-State Jazz Ensemble.

Free summer meals for students

Free meals are available for children 18 and under and registered students with disabilities up to age 21, Magnolia ISD announced in a press release.

Meals are made possible by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program and administered by the Texas Department of Agriculture.

“With nearly 2 million food-insecure children living in Texas, these healthy meals are essential to keep Texans fed during summer vacation,” said Kimberly Ohlendorf, director of child nutrition.

Breakfast and lunch will be offered at Magnolia Elementary, Williams Elementary, Magnolia Intermediate, Bear Branch Intermediate, DEAP (Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs), Magnolia High and Magnolia West.

Meals will be distributed in the cafeterias and must be consumed on site. For more information on meal sites such as dates and times, visit www.summerfood.org.

Teachers celebrate their retirement

More than 40 Magnolia ISD educators celebrated their retirement in the past school year, the district announced in May.

Elementary, middle and high school staff members were recognized for their service. To see a list of all retirees, visit www.magnoliaisd.org/apps/news/article/1619846.

Bear Branch Hosts College Event

Bear Branch Junior High held its first College & Career EPIC event in late April which more than 250 eighth graders attended, according to an announcement on the Magnolia ISD website.

The event was organized by Maria Osborn and Roxanne Langley, college and career preparation teachers, who wanted a place where students could apply what they learned by participating in mock interviews and practicing their communication skills.

The students experienced real interviews and received feedback from 28 qualified volunteers who participated in the event.

“This event helps our students gain confidence by giving them the opportunity to reflect on their non-verbal and verbal communication skills. It also gives interviewees the opportunity to make mistakes and work to correct them in a safe environment,” Osborn said.

Students also learned other skills such as check writing and budgeting and learned about the different classes and certifications available in high school.

Osborn hopes to reach more than 1,000 students next year by expanding the event to both colleges.

alvaro.montano@chron.com

]]>
Christiansburg Council Approves New Private School License | Education https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/christiansburg-council-approves-new-private-school-license-education/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/christiansburg-council-approves-new-private-school-license-education/ CHRISTIANSBURG — The city is expected to soon see the addition of a private school focused on children who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder or another developmental disability. The school will be an extension of the Hughes Center, which is based in Danville and operates a residential treatment center and day school in […]]]>

CHRISTIANSBURG — The city is expected to soon see the addition of a private school focused on children who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder or another developmental disability.

The school will be an extension of the Hughes Center, which is based in Danville and operates a residential treatment center and day school in that city. The center has a second satellite school in South Boston.

Hughes Center CEO Mark Howard told a recent Christiansburg City Council meeting that the city’s school will have a similar model to Danville’s. Another key point he highlighted is that a school in the area may negate the need for local children to be bused to other parts of the state to receive the additional support, a process that, according to him, can require journeys of more than one hour.

Howard said they reviewed Christiansburg and identified the town as an area of ​​need.

When asked if any local students with special needs currently attend Montgomery County schools, Howard said that was a possibility. He said, however, that students generally attend another private day school that public school systems pay for with the help of Children’s Services Act funds.

People also read…

The Christiansburg school will be located in an existing 4,400 square foot facility at 1650 Cambria Street. The project recently cleared a major hurdle when city council unanimously approved a conditional use permit needed to authorize a private school in a business district. .

The permit vote was also notable for being an expedited measure.

The only school-related item on the May 24 city council agenda was a public hearing on the requested conditional use permit.

Councilman Henry Showalter pointed out that public hearing questions are normally subject to a two-week waiting period before being voted on to give citizens time to weigh in on the measures. He said the elected body had in the past been accused of sometimes playing favorites when it came to eliminating that waiting period, although he clarified that had not been a problem with the current city council.

Showalter and Councilman Sam Bishop each voted against a call to add the school permit vote to the May 24 agenda, with the former stressing the need to keep those terms level playing field across the board.

However, Mayor Mike Barber, who only votes in a tie, pointed out that the school is up against a two-and-a-half-month construction schedule.

“And you cut it pretty close,” Barber told Howard, who told the board that plans are for the program to begin in the fall and the facility needs to be prepared.

Most council members agreed to immediately add the permit vote to the agenda. The board, in another vote, unanimously approved the conditional use license.

Councilwoman Johana Hicks acknowledged the point raised by Showalter about the waiting period.

“But in this situation, I think, just like the mayor and the other members of the council, that it is important to move [on] that,” Hicks said.

As for the three-classroom school, Howard said they expect the program to begin with an enrollment of around eight to 10 students. He said the program should then reach a maximum enrollment of 28 students over the next three years.

Howard said the school seeks to serve Montgomery County and surrounding areas. He said they plan to employ around eight staff members.

City officials also clarified that the permit recently approved by council would only allow the operation of a day school and that no students will be housed in a residential setting on the property.

]]>
Lawmakers must ensure affordable housing for low-income older Americans https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lawmakers-must-ensure-affordable-housing-for-low-income-older-americans/ Tue, 31 May 2022 04:30:28 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lawmakers-must-ensure-affordable-housing-for-low-income-older-americans/ Marta Hill Gray May was the month of older Americans, but I bet you didn’t see many celebrations. Despite the rapidly aging population, little has been done in the political arena to ensure that less affluent older Americans can access affordable housing and receive the care they need with ease and dignity. In 2019, there […]]]>
Marta Hill Gray

May was the month of older Americans, but I bet you didn’t see many celebrations. Despite the rapidly aging population, little has been done in the political arena to ensure that less affluent older Americans can access affordable housing and receive the care they need with ease and dignity.

In 2019, there were 54 million Americans aged 65 and over, or 16% of the population; this share is expected to reach 22% by 2040. Nearly 5 million of these people were living below the poverty line, and another 2.6 million were dangerously close. If you sense the urgency in these numbers, you’re on the right track.

Across the country, affordable housing is a critical issue; older Americans are constantly seeing their resources dwindle and facing long waiting lists in nursing homes. As affordable housing options decrease, the number of homeless seniors increases. In 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic, a University of Pennsylvania housing study released a sobering estimate that the number of homeless older Americans will triple over the next decade. We must act quickly and mobilize efforts to provide affordable housing options for seniors.

My work at Culpepper Garden, which houses 365 low-income seniors in 273 independent living apartments and 73 assisted living apartments, regularly reminds me that every senior has lived a full life. Some have had illustrious careers, some have done unglamorous work that has rocked our schools and cities, and others have cared for their own elders or raised the next generation. We need to see them as the sum of their lived experiences, not their current financial situation.

No one can predict the future. Some of us will outlive our savings, despite our best efforts and solid retirement plans.

Culpepper Garden is one of the few communities in the United States that caters to low-income seniors and provides subsidized access to housing and care. Providing this kind of support to our residents is not easy and depends on a combination of private and corporate philanthropy, grants and, in our case, federal grants. I am proud to note that our assisted living facility was the first in the country to receive grants from the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development and is a viable model that should be replicated in other parts of the country.

Amid the soaring cost of living, affordable housing for seniors is a pressing issue of social justice. If we don’t course correct and design a new housing policy, an additional 2.4 million low-income older Americans will not have access to affordable housing. Research shows that federal subsidies to offset housing expenses effectively rescue low-income families from poverty. At facilities like ours, federal support is a crucial safety net for some of our most vulnerable residents. I can well imagine the good such grants could do if implemented in senior living communities across the country.

There is a quote from Nelson Mandela that conveys a key message: “A society that does not value its elderly denies its roots and jeopardizes its future. There is no doubt that we collectively share the moral responsibility to ensure that everything older Americans have a place to live as they approach the final chapter of their lives. Our legislators on Capitol Hill, less than 10 miles from Culpepper Garden, have an important part in that responsibility. How we meet this moment will define us as a nation.

I urge Congress to introduce and pass legislation to ensure low-income older Americans have access to affordable housing and assisted living facilities. As American Older Month comes to a close, I invite you to reach out to your representative through the LeadingAge Advocacy Center and add your voice to support our cause.

Marta Hill Gray is the Executive Director of Culpepper Garden, a residential community for low-income seniors in Arlington, Virginia offering independent and supported living options.

The opinions expressed in each McKnight Senior Residence guest column are those of the author and are not necessarily those of McKnight Senior Residence.

A column idea? See our submission guidelines here.

]]>