Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 A measure to allow child care at San Diego parks and recreation centers wins voter approval. What is the next step ? https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/a-measure-to-allow-child-care-at-san-diego-parks-and-recreation-centers-wins-voter-approval-what-is-the-next-step/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/a-measure-to-allow-child-care-at-san-diego-parks-and-recreation-centers-wins-voter-approval-what-is-the-next-step/ Child care advocates celebrate election results that show San Diego voters approved a ballot measure that could alleviate a shortage of affordable child care options in the city. Measure H gave voters the option to change city rules to allow child care centers in public parks — part of the city’s overall plan to adapt […]]]>

Child care advocates celebrate election results that show San Diego voters approved a ballot measure that could alleviate a shortage of affordable child care options in the city.

Measure H gave voters the option to change city rules to allow child care centers in public parks — part of the city’s overall plan to adapt dozens of city properties to accommodate child care centers to serve children. city ​​workers and many residents, some of whom may not work without it.

Measure H had about 69% voter support according to the latest update from the San Diego County Voter Registry on Nov. 18.

The measure was placed on a Nov. 8 ballot after an 8-0 city council vote in July and required the approval of a simple majority of voters to pass.

Child care advocates say its adoption is an important step in the right direction.

“We view the passage of Measure H as a clear and resounding message to voters that child care is absolutely essential to them,” said Erin Hogeboom, director of San Diego for Every Child, a nonprofit organization. not-for-profit that works to meet the basic needs of children. are met.

Although San Diego County has had a child care shortage for years, the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated it, said Courtney Baltiyskyy, YMCA vice president of policy and advocacy.

Twelve percent of daycares in the county have closed during the pandemic and nearly 190,000 children under 12 who need care are missing it, according to a YMCA survey last year.

A University of San Diego report in April said available child care spaces are unaffordable for many families, costing $12,900 to $19,500 a year.

Access to childcare is key to tackling child poverty because it allows parents to work to support their homes, Hogeboom said.

In recent years, she and other advocates have worked closely with the city to try to find solutions. Among them was the idea of ​​using city properties as child care centres.

Last year, the city’s Department of Real Estate and Airports Management began evaluating 1,100 city-owned properties seeking facilities of at least 5,000 square feet on the ground floor. pavement to create small day care centers with four classrooms and an adjacent outdoor space that could be transformed into a playground.

A total of 72 properties have been identified across the city council’s nine districts, including 18 libraries, 12 office buildings and 42 leisure centres. Among them was the La Jolla/Riford Library at 7555 Draper Ave., though branch manager Bill Mallory said earlier this year that nothing had been finalized.

Many of La Jolla’s current daycare offerings are tied to churches and private schools, as well as some home-based businesses.

However, the city charter states that any land dedicated to “park, recreation, or cemetery purposes shall be used only for park, recreation, or cemetery purposes,” unless the voters of the city ​​does not approve of such an exception. Measure H would amend the charter to make it legal for municipal recreation centers to provide child care services.

“With the adoption of the H measure, we can now analyze 42 additional sites in our city, in each neighborhood, to deliver [child care] service to our constituents, which is why it passed with such an overwhelming margin,” said Councilor Raul Campillo, chairman of the Economic Development and Intergovernmental Relations Committee. “One of the most important amenities parents look for in their community is child care.

Measure H does not require recreation centers to become child care centers, officials say. Each center will be reviewed to determine suitability. In some cases, the cost of conversion may be too high.

An August report from the city’s independent budget analyst said it was unclear whether those costs would be borne by the city or private child care operators.

Baltiyskyy said Measure H was “the first time in our area that we’ve seen child care on the ballot for anything, so it was a really good test to kind of see how the optics would be played with the electoral base”.

She said she hopes to see similar initiatives follow to secure more funding for childcare – especially in upcoming budget negotiations.

Hogeboom would like childcare to also be incorporated into plans for future affordable housing developments.

Already, the San Diego Public Library Foundation and the San Diego Parks Foundation are hard at work supplementing the city budget with funds that could help provide care in the city’s libraries and parks.

They are joined by other groups in an attempt to drum up support for a proposed ballot initiative in 2024 that would create a 2-cent-per-square-foot plot tax on certain residential and commercial plots — not exceeding one acre and n not including some seniors’ and low-income housing — to fund improvements to the library and park.

And Hogeboom said the city would be eligible to apply for California’s $250 million child care infrastructure grant program.

In the meantime, the city has asked child care providers for their input on how it can establish facilities on city-owned properties. City staff are working to compile the information into a proposal to identify potential operators to be released early next year. Staff also work with the City Attorney’s Office and the City’s Department of Developmental Services to investigate zoning and permit requirements.

Now, Baltiyskyy and Hogeboom said, the city will begin to develop a partnership with child care providers to operate the centers.

“San Diego is a great place to raise a family…but we still have a long way to go for it to be the best place to grow and raise a family and for us to truly understand and meet the needs of parents and caregivers,” says Baltiysky.

— La Jolla Light staff contributed to this report.

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City Council Approves Majestic Gateway Business Park | New https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/city-council-approves-majestic-gateway-business-park-new/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 04:15:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/city-council-approves-majestic-gateway-business-park-new/ The Majestic Gateway project, which has sparked elation from union workers and anger from residents, was approved by Bakersfield City Council on Wednesday night. The city council has agreed to rezone the 93-acre lot near Greenfield, qualifying it for construction of several commercial buildings and a 50-foot-tall, 1-million-square-foot warehouse. The mall would make up about […]]]>

The Majestic Gateway project, which has sparked elation from union workers and anger from residents, was approved by Bakersfield City Council on Wednesday night.

The city council has agreed to rezone the 93-acre lot near Greenfield, qualifying it for construction of several commercial buildings and a 50-foot-tall, 1-million-square-foot warehouse. The mall would make up about 16% of the site, according to city statistics.

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Campaign to end school fires caught from learners https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/campaign-to-end-school-fires-caught-from-learners/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 10:13:51 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/campaign-to-end-school-fires-caught-from-learners/ “Schools are meant to be safe learning spaces for our school children,” Dr Joyce Moriku Kaducu, Minister of State for Primary Education, said recently ahead of the launch of a fire safety education campaign. for schools across the country. “It is truly disheartening to see that the high rates of school fires that go unchecked […]]]>

“Schools are meant to be safe learning spaces for our school children,” Dr Joyce Moriku Kaducu, Minister of State for Primary Education, said recently ahead of the launch of a fire safety education campaign. for schools across the country.

“It is truly disheartening to see that the high rates of school fires that go unchecked are due to negligence and a lack of preventative measures such as the installation of recommended firefighting equipment.”

Dubbed Cool Kids Stop Fires, the campaign led by Vivo Energy will be implemented in partnership with the Uganda Police Directorate of Fire Prevention and Rescue Services and the Ministry of Education and Sports.

The initiative, launched at Greenhill Academy last month, is being implemented as a measure to reduce incidents of school fires and the resulting injuries, deaths and property loss.

During the campaign launch, it was revealed that most school fires are intentionally set by students to settle personal scores.

In addition, the report “Security and Safety Guidelines to Educational Institutions of Learning”, signed by Inspector General of Police Martin Okoth Ochola, revealed that between January 5, 2022 and June 27, 2022, a total of 40 fires were recorded in 39 schools and institutions in Uganda.

“Unfortunately, seven learners lost their lives,” reveals in part the June 28, 2022 report, released recently by IPMA Joseph Mugisa, Police Director of Fire and Rescue Services during an education campaign fire safety in schools in Uganda.

“Investigations have so far established that of the 40 incidents, 17 were committed intentionally (deliberately); four were the result of negligence, four accidental, i.e. electrical fire circuits. The causes of the 15 fires have not been established,” said AIGP Mugisa, who represented Mr Ochola.

Other surveys have also established that the most affected schools are boarding schools and private properties, with the exception of Teso College, Kabalega SSS, Lubiri SSS and Iganga SSS.

The fires mostly occurred in dormitories when students were outdoors, with the exception of Kibedi Junior School’s New Crest and St. Mary’s Prepartix Girls SS in Entebbe.

They occurred mainly between 5 a.m. and 6 a.m., 8 a.m. to noon, and 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., and occurred during the first two quarters of the year, mainly from May to August.

“These rampant school fires pose risks to the lives of children, their property, the properties of the affected schools and have a disruptive effect on the economy of our country. There is an urgent need for mass awareness, firefighting training and improved fire safety measures by schools through the installation of smoke detectors and alarms,” noted the AIGP Mugisa.

According to the Uganda Police Annual Crime Report 2021, a total of 1,258 fire emergencies were handled in 2021, compared to 1,015 in 2020, representing an increase of 23.9%.

Deputy Commissioner for Private Schools and Higher Education Institutes George Mutekanga, who received the report on behalf of the Ministry of Education and Sports, said most of the fires are caused by students in reaction to disciplinary measures caused by the school administration or as a result of disputes between students.

He quickly accused some school staff of having bad intentions.

“Some of these fires are started by students at one school copying what other students are doing at other schools,” he said.

“Sometimes the school administration also fails to implement the basic requirements and minimum standards of the Ministry of Education.”

Other accidental causes include the use of illegal electrical equipment by students, careless use of electrical equipment, careless handling of combustible lighting or cooking materials.

But just like the police, Johan Grobbelaar, managing director of Vivo Energy Uganda, says the fires can be stopped through campaigning.

“We would like to use our vast expertise and knowledge to help the nation fight school fires which have increased and pose a significant threat to the lives of our children and school property,” Mr Grobbelaar said.

“Through this campaign, we will provide fire safety education to students and educational institution stakeholders and train them in the prevention, detection and management of fires in schools to avoid losses. life and property,” he said.

Government interventions to curb the increase in fires include the institution of a committee by the Department of Public Works and Transportation to review educational, commercial and residential facilities and assess compliance with fire prevention standards.

The committee includes representatives from the Uganda Police Force, Ministry of Public Works, Ministry of Education and Sports, Ministry of Gender, Labor and Social Development, Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Affairs and Landlords of private schools.

“This campaign has various components, including awareness campaigns in schools to improve fire safety knowledge and preparedness, donation of fire detection equipment, and mass fire safety awareness,” explained Mr Grobbelaar.

The police are urging educational institutions to “activate safety and security committees for staff and learners” as well as to “implement fire and security measures such as portable fire extinguishers”.

“The main role of the committees is to develop and oversee the implementation of safety and security policy for the respective institutions,” Mugisa said.

He added that there should be controlled access to the premises as well as ensure security inside the premises.

“There should be proper identification of all people in the school by providing identification tags for teachers and uniforms for support staff.”

Another recommendation is that schools ensure that institutional structures comply with the provisions of existing legislation for design, construction, maintenance and change of use.

“Provide separate accommodation for each sex and age group; three to four square meters of floor space per student,” the report states.

Learners should bring the culture of school safety home.

“When you see your brother tampering with a cooker and tell him it could lead to an accident, you will have done a good job of safety. Keep it up and pass it on to your colleagues. The more security conscious we are, the safer we stay,” he said.

According to Dr. Kaducu, following the directive issued on the management of fire safety in schools, the ministry must intensify the inspection of this aspect to ensure compliance in educational institutions.

“I encourage school leaders to prioritize the safety of the children in their care by implementing these preventative measures,” Dr Kaducu said.

According to the Uganda Police, urgent issues that need to be addressed include increased security in schools with guarded dormitories when students go on vacation, schools installing fire alarms and cameras, fire awareness as well as exercises and regular inspection of schools for compliance. to safety standards.

Do not permit/permit the burning of trash or waste near dormitories, stores, classrooms, etc. Any burning of waste must be carried out in an incinerator controlled by specially designed workers.

Do not allow lighters that produce flame or heat to enter dormitories or classrooms

Students at Greenhill Academy enjoy a moment of relaxation with officers from the Police Fire Department after the launch of the Cool Kids.

Do not allow rudimentary but dangerous heat-producing electrical appliances and objects such as springs known as “suicide” into dormitories or any other premises.

Do not undertake hot electrical welding or cutting of metals, repair work in a dormitory or laboratory, store or office occupied with combustible materials, first remove combustible materials before worlds of welding or electrical cutting are undertaken. This work must be supervised before, during and after must have an emergency fire extinguisher before, during and after the work.

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Man, 40, sentenced on fentanyl drug charges in Bangor https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/man-40-sentenced-on-fentanyl-drug-charges-in-bangor/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 22:16:42 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/man-40-sentenced-on-fentanyl-drug-charges-in-bangor/ Bangor Man faces 30 months in prison for drug trafficking A 40-year-old Bangor man was sentenced to 30 months (2.5 years) in prison on Thursday for possession of fentanyl with intent to distribute. Kristopher Churchill also faces three years of probation. He pleaded guilty on April 21, 2022. U.S. Attorney Darcie N. McElwee released the […]]]>

Bangor Man faces 30 months in prison for drug trafficking

A 40-year-old Bangor man was sentenced to 30 months (2.5 years) in prison on Thursday for possession of fentanyl with intent to distribute.

Kristopher Churchill also faces three years of probation. He pleaded guilty on April 21, 2022. U.S. Attorney Darcie N. McElwee released the information on November 3, 2022.

K9 brought to traffic stop

Court records show Maine State Police arrested Churchill on April 5, 2022 for multiple traffic violations. A drug detection dog was brought to the scene. The K9 alerted to the presence of drugs and Churchill’s vehicle was searched.

Suspicion of fentanyl in vehicle floor area

Police found “a large quantity of suspected fentanyl or heroin in plastic shopping bags in the rear seat floor area as well as in a box within arm’s reach of Churchill.”

Lab tests confirmed aa Fentanyl packets

The results of a lab test confirmed that the packages contained fentanyl. Investigators said “the amount of fentanyl seized was consistent with distribution as opposed to an amount for personal use.”

Law enforcement working on the case

Several agencies were involved in the investigation, including the Maine Drug Enforcement Agency. the United States Drug Enforcement Administration and the Maine State Police.

News updates and app alerts

This news will be updated when additional information becomes available and published. Look for additional details on the homepage, social media, and app. Download the app for the latest news and alerts.

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of history’s most infamous crimes took place – and what these places are used for today. (If they remained standing.)

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ASU’s WP Carey School Inducts New Alumni Hall of Fame Class https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/asus-wp-carey-school-inducts-new-alumni-hall-of-fame-class/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 19:50:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/asus-wp-carey-school-inducts-new-alumni-hall-of-fame-class/ October 31, 2022 An Arizona State University social work professor whose research on cultural diversity and youth substance abuse has earned him high esteem in the prevention field will receive the Helen Rodriguez Social Justice Award next month. American Public Health Association Trias 2022. Professor Regents Flavio Marsiglia, director of ASU’s Global Center for Applied […]]]>
October 31, 2022

An Arizona State University social work professor whose research on cultural diversity and youth substance abuse has earned him high esteem in the prevention field will receive the Helen Rodriguez Social Justice Award next month. American Public Health Association Trias 2022.

Professor Regents Flavio Marsiglia, director of ASU’s Global Center for Applied Health Research, will receive the award Nov. 8 for his preventive public health work with underserved communities near the U.S.-Mexico border, according to a statement from the October 6 of the association.

Regents Professor Flavio Marsiglia of the ASU School of Social Work. Photo of the USS
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“Marsiglia’s work includes founding the Interdisciplinary Research Center of the Southwest (ASU) to address health disparities in underserved communities and creating a substance use prevention initiative for young Hispanics,” the statement read. The model school-based prevention program, called Keepin’it REAL, was later adapted for urban Native American children in the Southwest.

Marsiglia is the principal investigator of a study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse/National Institutes of Health based in Mexico to culturally adapt and test the effectiveness of Keepin’it REAL in Mexico. He and his team are also implementing and evaluating culture-based interventions to prevent substance abuse in other countries in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

The Helen Rodriguez-Trias Award is given to an individual who has worked for social justice for underserved and disadvantaged populations – an individual whose work focuses on improving the health and well-being of these populations – and includes leadership, advocacy, and mentoring (any or all three), depending on the association.

The honor is named after the late Dr. Helen Rodriguez-Trias, pediatrician and former president of the American Public Health Association. Rodriguez-Trias was an inspiration and role model who strove to meet the needs of underserved and disadvantaged populations, especially women and children, according to the association. Through her work and activism, she has used social justice strategies that have enhanced change.

Marsiglia noted that the award named for Rodriguez-Trias had special meaning for him.

“The award is named after an inspirational and transformational advocate for social justice in public health. Her work promoting the rights of all women and children to lead healthy lives has inspired our own work,” said Marsiglia. “This is recognition of the community-based health equity research we conduct with our community partners, faculty, staff, and students in Arizona, nationally, and globally. Much of this work is made possible by the ongoing support we receive from ASU, the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health.

Foundation Professor Elizabeth Lightfoot, Director of the School of Social Work, said: “The accolades keep pouring in for Dr Flavio Marsiglia, each as well-deserved as the next, but this one is particularly significant because she focuses on her dedication. to social justice.

“His efforts with Keepin’it REAL and many other culturally grounded interventions to stem the tide of substance abuse among youth in underserved communities are highly regarded as a model program. I join my colleagues at the School of Social Work in congratulating him on receiving this great honour.

The school is based at ASU’s Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions. Watts College Dean Cynthia Lietz, the president’s professor of social work, also praised Marsiglia for her accomplishments leading up to the award.

“Dr. APHA’s recognition of Flavio Marsiglia with a social justice-focused award is not only an incredible honor, but it is definitely deserved,” Lietz said. Marsiglia has spent his entire career working to build a more equitable society. This prestigious award is testament to that commitment and ability to demonstrate real-world impact.

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Cambridge accused of ‘social engineering’ as public school pupils now more likely to get places https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/cambridge-accused-of-social-engineering-as-public-school-pupils-now-more-likely-to-get-places/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 20:05:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/cambridge-accused-of-social-engineering-as-public-school-pupils-now-more-likely-to-get-places/ Mr Orr-Ewing says he has been told by Oxford insiders that admissions tutors will ‘beat each other’ if they haven’t offered places to students placed in the ‘most favored’ category who come from private schools and have not benefited from a scholarship. He says Keystone Tutors’ job isn’t to “teach tips and tricks.” Instead, “it’s […]]]>

Mr Orr-Ewing says he has been told by Oxford insiders that admissions tutors will ‘beat each other’ if they haven’t offered places to students placed in the ‘most favored’ category who come from private schools and have not benefited from a scholarship.

He says Keystone Tutors’ job isn’t to “teach tips and tricks.” Instead, “it’s much more about exposing inquisitive minds to really difficult things over a long period of time and making them intellectually irresistible.”

“What they really want to avoid is maybe the kind of person I was applying to Harrow from Oxford, who was a ‘decent, bright enough, all in’ candidate, but was wrong. continue and necessarily be an academic or get a first class degree.

Admissions tutors want to ‘see the light’ behind applicants’ eyes

Sarah Alakija, an admissions expert from Oxbridge, says she helped a pupil from Winchester in the last admissions round who was rejected from Oxford, Durham, LSE and Warwick with 3 A* predictions and a ” great personal statement”.

“There was no explanation I could give his parents for this. We made sure he was applying to a college with centuries-old links to Winchester and that didn’t work out either.

She says there’s “nothing wrong” with the Oxbridge app support that schools like Winchester, Eton and St Paul’s already offer their pupils, but “parents are so scared they feel that they will do anything to get the extra edge.” Ms. Alakija is focused on helping students develop a deep level of understanding and passion for the topics they are applying for prior to interviews.

She asked a Cambridge admissions tutor at a recent event what her favorite candidate looked like. “The response was ‘when I interview someone, I want to see the light behind their eyes when they talk about the subject.’ I think that’s what you can’t prepare.


Cambridge professor speaks out on how the college admissions process puts private school students at a disadvantage

Anonymous

The pendulum as it currently stands has certainly swung too far against private schools. Cambridge has opted to voluntarily include public school admissions targets as part of its own targets to be achieved by 2024. admissions in the state this year and 71.6 percent last year. while self-imposed targets were 66.1% and 64.6% respectively.

As so often happens, this success in easily exceeding our goals did not lead to a deep reflection on the process or a detailed study of student results. Instead, it just created a new baseline that we are now being told we need to “improve” on more.

A new “access and participation plan” should be submitted with more ambitious statistics.

The upshot of all of this is that there is indeed a disadvantage for privately trained students. It is of course not true that a truly brilliant student in a public school would ever be blocked from entering. But it is true that, even if it is a question of paying attention only to the characteristics “indicated” in the profile of a person (socio-economic data, low university attendance, postal zone, having been taken care of, free school meals, etc.), having attended an independent school may well play a negative role.

This tends to happen after the strongest applicants (from any school background) have secured a spot: a college admissions tutor, eager to achieve his or her goal. is self taxed, will be aware of the proportion of state independents at this stage of the admissions process. , and may find that more offers are needed for public school applicants to reach the (in practice arbitrary) target figure. Thus, at this point, two applicants who scored equally are likely to be disaggregated on the basis of schooling, so that public school is considered “better” for the targets. This may mask the fact that the independent school applicant is a full-scholarship student from a disadvantaged background, while the public school applicant may be from one of the sixth-form schools. or state grammars the better off. Thus, a coarse metric ends up disadvantageizing those who are potentially equally (or perhaps even more) deserving.

This really comes to a head in the winter and summer pools, when students who failed to gain a place in the college they applied to (winter) or who failed to gain the grades from their offer (summer) are picked up by other colleges. eager to fill their places. It almost always happens that the admissions tutor who oversees these decisions for his colleges finds himself at this point in a position where he feels he can only take few or perhaps even zero students from independent schools.

This essentially excludes deserving applicants (which is what the winter pool is supposed to consider) at this crucial stage of the process, not for academic reasons but due to school decisions made, presumably, by their parents. If we indeed decide that privileged candidates with excellent education are also saddled with the burden of that privilege, then the process begins to look dirty, unfair and, on an intellectual level, indefensible. Meanwhile, very wealthy foreign applicants are welcome, as they pay significantly higher fees and do not infringe on local student statistics.

That said, the vast majority of academics strive to take the best applicants – by which we mean those who seem to have the greatest potential to thrive in the course, which is not exactly the same as those who are successful best in their A-levels. and entrance exams. We seek to judge each applicant on their own academic merits, and many of us have not been barred from taking any given applicant because of their school. But if parents have paid to bring a child through, say, Eton, and admissions to that school have halved in the last seven years, the writing may be on the wall for those in independent schools who are not not considered first class.

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Hopkins Fields Renovation Spotlights Hadley’s Special TM Thursday https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/hopkins-fields-renovation-spotlights-hadleys-special-tm-thursday/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 15:44:58 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/hopkins-fields-renovation-spotlights-hadleys-special-tm-thursday/ HADLEY — A second phase of renovations to the sports fields at Hopkins Academy, including the construction of a walking path for community use, is on the highlights that voters will decide at Thursday’s Special Town Hall. Residents will also decide to buy several vehicles for the Department of Public Works – totaling more than […]]]>

HADLEY — A second phase of renovations to the sports fields at Hopkins Academy, including the construction of a walking path for community use, is on the highlights that voters will decide at Thursday’s Special Town Hall.

Residents will also decide to buy several vehicles for the Department of Public Works – totaling more than $1 million – and adopt a declaration that the world is facing a climate crisis, as well as a request from the Police Department to replace body cameras.

The 12-item mandate for the Special Municipal Assembly will be presented to residents beginning at 7 p.m. at Hopkins Academy.

The project at the school is to use $1.55 million from the Community Preservation Act to build new playgrounds, such as a new girls’ softball field, revamp the varsity baseball field for boys and installing scoreboards, which will continue a previous $600,000 investment made by the city. to expand the site.

At a Board-sponsored public forum on the mandate, CPA committee chair Mary Thayer said the Hopkins project has support, despite the cost.

“It has a high price tag,” Thayer said. “The CPA committee felt that this benefited the entire city, and it certainly benefited high school and college and all the sports teams that play there.”

The plan is to borrow $750,000 of the cost so that the CPA account continues to have flexibility for future projects. Currently, the account has $2.41 million to spend.

The only other new CPA project is $25,000 which will be used to renovate the Hockanum Cemetery fence.

A series of requests for trucks and equipment from the Department of Public Works will be made by borrowing under the tax levy or using existing reserves. Finance committee chair Amy Fyden said making capital purchases in this way will ensure residential property tax bills are not affected.

The most expensive vehicle would be the $500,000 vactor water and sewer truck, to replace a 1995 Ford L8000 truck. This vehicle is used to clear blockages in sewer lines and vacuum clean sumps, and is one of the most heavily used rooms in the department, said DPW Director Scott McCarthy.

Another $310,000 would buy a new International 5-ton dump truck and sander to replace a 1997 model that is falling apart. “The truck is really starting to rot,” McCarthy said.

A new pay loader would be purchased for $260,000 and would replace a 1995 John Deere 624G. McCarthy said parts for repairs are getting harder to find.

Police are asking for $46,464 for body cameras. “We’re coming to the end of our warranty period and we’re losing cameras faster than we’re putting them back into service,” Chief of Police Michael Mason said.

Mason said Hadley became the first department in the area to have integral cameras several years ago and now needs to upgrade and replace them, although no state or private grants are available. .

The schools are asking for $163,400 to replace water-damaged ceiling tiles at Hopkins Academy, while Hadley Media is asking for $20,000 for new equipment.

Climate statement

Jack Czajkowski, chair of the Hadley Climate Change Committee, said the climate emergency declaration that is presented to voters has been adjusted based on feedback from residents, including those who came to a recent public forum where experts offered information about the evolution of the weather.

The statement, which seeks to align the city with emissions reduction goals and state preparedness goals, specifically calls out concern for the livelihoods of farmers and others.

“The city will work to ensure that the costs of these climate actions do not unfairly burden our farmers, low-income members of our community, and those who are otherwise disadvantaged or particularly vulnerable,” the statement said.

The committee also adds a preamble noting that “the express intention of this statement is to make climate change a top priority for the planning, policy and action of the Town of Hadley, including its select council, the administration of the city and the councils, commissions and committees concerned.

Other tenure business includes a series of adjustments to the fiscal year 2023 operating budget, totaling $219,528, which will increase spending from $19.42 million to $19.64 million. These increases come from various expenses, including a temporary hiring at City Hall to replace an employee who was on sick leave, and more support staff for the Treasurer and Collector’s Office.

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at smerzbach@gazettenet.com.

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Supreme Court of Canada refuses to hear appeal of blow to residential school survivors | Canada https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/supreme-court-of-canada-refuses-to-hear-appeal-of-blow-to-residential-school-survivors-canada/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 18:14:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/supreme-court-of-canada-refuses-to-hear-appeal-of-blow-to-residential-school-survivors-canada/ The Supreme Court of Canada has refused to hear an appeal by a group of residential school survivors, dealing a blow to their decade-long fight with the federal government over thousands of unpublished documents. Survivors of St Anne’s Indian Residential School hoped the nation’s highest court would take up their case, which alleges Canada’s federal […]]]>

The Supreme Court of Canada has refused to hear an appeal by a group of residential school survivors, dealing a blow to their decade-long fight with the federal government over thousands of unpublished documents.

Survivors of St Anne’s Indian Residential School hoped the nation’s highest court would take up their case, which alleges Canada’s federal government withheld key evidence in determining compensation for victims of abuse at the northern school of Ontario.

The court did not say why it refused to hear the case, as is common practice.

But the decision was strongly criticized and disbelieved by prominent indigenous voices.

“There are no words to say how awful this is, how justice is continually being denied to survivors of St Anne’s Indian Residential School, their families,” tweeted writer Tanya Talaga. “Canada should have done the right thing when it all started. Distribute OPP records and reports detailing abuse. How difficult is it? »

Pam Palmater, a law professor, called the decision “disgusting”, writing on social media that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his cabinet should be “shamed” after fighting the release of the documents.

St Anne’s, which operated from 1902 to 1976 in the community of Fort Albany, was part of a network of religious and public institutions where 150,000 Native children were sent as part of a campaign of forced assimilation.

Quick guide

Residential schools in Canada

Spectacle

Residential schools in Canada

In 100 years, more than 150,000 Indigenous children were taken from their families to attend state-funded Christian boarding schools in an effort to forcibly assimilate them into Canadian society.

They were given new names, forcibly converted to Christianity and forbidden to speak their native language. Thousands of people died of disease, neglect and suicide; many were never returned to their families.

The last boarding school closed in 1996.

Almost three-quarters of the 130 residential schools were run by Roman Catholic missionary congregations, with the rest being run by Presbyterians, Anglicans and the United Church of Canada, which is now the largest Protestant denomination in the country.

In 2015, a landmark Truth and Reconciliation Commission concluded that the residential school system amounted to a policy of cultural genocide.

Testimonies from survivors made it clear that sexual, emotional and physical abuse was rampant in the schools. And the trauma suffered by students has often been passed on to younger generations – a reality amplified by the systematic inequalities that persist across the country.

Dozens of First Nations do not have access to safe drinking water, and racism against Indigenous peoples is endemic within the health care system. Indigenous people are overrepresented in federal prisons and Indigenous women are killed at a much higher rate than other groups.

Commissioners identified 20 unmarked burial sites at former residential schools, but also warned that other unmarked burial sites had yet to be found across the country.

Photo: Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan/PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF SASKATCHE

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The school was notorious for widespread abuse, including the use of a homemade electric chair built to punish Indigenous children.

In 2006, following an apology from the federal government regarding widespread abuse and neglect in schools, a framework was announced to determine compensation.

The process began in 2007, and the settlement agreement between survivors and the federal government included a provision that awarded a fixed payment to children who had suffered extreme abuse at residential schools.

But St Anne’s survivors say the federal government breached its obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement after withholding documents that could have affected compensation.

Under the agreement, the federal government was obligated to turn over documents that would help adjudicate claims of abuse and determine fair compensation.

But the government withheld thousands of relevant documents, as part of an investigation by the Ontario Provincial Police into allegations of sexual and physical abuse at school in the 1990s.

As a result of the investigation, four former school staff members, as well as an Indian Affairs employee, were charged.

The judge overseeing the settlement said the omission was a “mistake” and appeared unintentional. But some school survivors say they lost compensation cases – or received lower payments – because of doubts about the abuse they suffered.

A subsequent investigation into the missing documents concluded that the federal government should reconsider 11 abuse cases. The federal government has said it will reopen specific cases.

Prior to the highest court’s decision, the Liberal government had urged the Supreme Court, through court documents, not to intervene in the case.

Charlie Angus, a lawmaker representing the area where the school operated, criticized the court’s decision.

“The Ministry of Justice suppressed evidence of crimes at St Annes. Government lawyers attacked the survivors in private hearings. The Liberals have spent millions to perpetuate this injustice.

Now the Supreme Court system trusts the government,” he tweeted. “There is no reconciliation”

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Saturday night shooting in East Kennewick leaves 18-year-old dead https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/saturday-night-shooting-in-east-kennewick-leaves-18-year-old-dead/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 17:50:29 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/saturday-night-shooting-in-east-kennewick-leaves-18-year-old-dead/ The Benton County Sheriff’s Department says the situation is very “fluid” right now. These images show the areas where the woman was found (Downtown Kennewick) as well as Chemical Drive and Cable Bridge, which are believed to be part of the incident area. Fatal shooting kills young woman Benton County Sheriff Lt. Jason Erickson released […]]]>

The Benton County Sheriff’s Department says the situation is very “fluid” right now.

These images show the areas where the woman was found (Downtown Kennewick) as well as Chemical Drive and Cable Bridge, which are believed to be part of the incident area.

Fatal shooting kills young woman

Benton County Sheriff Lt. Jason Erickson released a statement Monday morning regarding a fatal Saturday night shooting in East Kennewick.

According to Erickson, at around 11:42 p.m., the regional dispatch center received a call about a shooting, which resulted from an altercation between the occupants of two vehicles. The BCSO statement says one vehicle stopped in the middle of the road, the other headed north towards the cable bridge on SR 397-Chemical Drive.

Then five minutes later, at 11:47 p.m., the dispatcher received another report, according to the BCSO:

(dispatch)..received a report of a female victim who was shot while inside a vehicle. The vehicle was stopped in the area of ​​1st Ave and St. Benton. The victim was later identified as Jatzivy, 18. Sarabia. Lifesaving measures were taken on Sarabia, unfortunately she succumbed to her injuries and passed away.”

There are not-confirmed reports indicating the incident, some of the shootings may have occurred near the area of ​​SR 397 and East 3rd. Av.

According to Erickson’s statement:

“This investigation is in its early stages and the information is very fluid. Detectives from the Benton County Sheriff’s Office are working with the Washington State Patrol Crime Lab to process multiple scenes.”

Anyone who may have information is asked to call (509)-628-0333. All leads can be confidential.

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of history’s most infamous crimes took place – and what these places are used for today. (If they remained standing.)

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Marin’s education board race bears hints of culture war https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/marins-education-board-race-bears-hints-of-culture-war/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 21:52:13 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/marins-education-board-race-bears-hints-of-culture-war/ Two candidates linked to a local group opposed to government mandates during the COVID-19 pandemic are vying in the Nov. 8 election for seats on the Marin County school board. Philip Wyatt, a mental health worker, and Lori Dali, mother of three teenagers enrolled in Marin public schools, were both identified as Marin Freedom Rising […]]]>

Two candidates linked to a local group opposed to government mandates during the COVID-19 pandemic are vying in the Nov. 8 election for seats on the Marin County school board.

Philip Wyatt, a mental health worker, and Lori Dali, mother of three teenagers enrolled in Marin public schools, were both identified as Marin Freedom Rising allies in an online newsletter published by the group.

Marin Freedom Rising spokesperson Janine Pera de Novato said Marin Freedom Rising does not officially endorse any candidate for the November races.

Wyatt is competing with incumbent Curtis Robinson, a Mill Valley doctor who has served on the board for 17 years, for a four-year seat representing southern Marin. Dali is competing with Li DelPan, a single mother who is vice president of Bank of Marin and holds a master’s degree in business administration, for a two-year seat on the board representing the Novato region.

Marin Freedom Rising describes itself on its website as “a freedom community in Marin County” with an interest in “medical freedom, informed consent, free speech, body sovereignty, the constitution, etc. ..”

Both Wyatt and Dali declined to be interviewed by the Independent Journal’s editorial board, and neither responded to requests for comment on this story.

When contacted by the newspaper in August for an article about the Marin Freedom Rising candidates running, Wyatt declined to be interviewed, saying he didn’t want to be identified as “anti-vax.” Wyatt said he would prefer to be described as “pro-choice, pro-body sovereignty and pro-informed consent.”

In his voting statement, Wyatt says he’s dedicated much of his adult life to “tutoring children and serving those with mental issues,” but says no more.

According to his LinkedIn site, Wyatt works for Elpida Programs, a nonprofit residential program for adults with chronic mental illnesses that operates four homes in Marin County. Elpida’s website lists Wyatt as a case manager and provides background information.

The site says Wyatt has worked in the mental health field for nearly 20 years, beginning his career working night shifts on a suicide hotline in Northampton, Massachusetts. It also says Wyatt worked for Buckelew programs in San Rafael for almost 10 years before joining Elpida programs in 2013.

In his ballot, Wyatt says Marin County students “appear disenchanted and depressed.”

“Obviously, our schools are not meeting the needs of students or our families,” he writes. “New ideas are needed to help revive our schools and help restore their credibility.”

In his email declining an invitation to be interviewed by the newspaper’s editorial board, Wyatt said that, if elected, his goals would include adding more music, art, theater and sports. in schools; creating support groups for students struggling with mental health issues; teaching conflict resolution techniques to children aged 12 and over; encourage students to create their own groups based on their interests; increase the involvement of parents and guardians and strengthen control of school budgets.

In her ballot, Dali says she is the mother of three teenagers in Marin Public Schools and says her goal “is to help provide a happy, healthy, free-thinking, fact-based environment for our young people and a welcoming place for parent involvement, especially in the 3 years since the pandemic disruptions.

According to his LinkedIn site, Dali holds a bachelor’s degree in food, nutrition, and wellness studies from Immaculata University in Pennsylvania. She spent four years working as a dietician at Massachusetts General Hospital before working for Merck as a sales representative and market analyst from 1998 to 2003. Since 2015, Dali has worked as an account manager for Last Man Media, a San Francisco videography.

In his ballot, Dali wrote, “With a vast background in health care, I don’t think schools should be in medicine.”

At a meeting of Marin County supervisors in May, Dali was among a large group of public commentators opposing the administration of COVID-19 vaccines to children.

“For medical reasons, because my children are fragile, I cannot and do not want to vaccinate them,” Dali said at the time.

During his interview with the editorial board, Dali’s opponent, Curtis Robinson, said: “I am concerned about my opponent. We’re starting to see a lot of anti-vaxxers, Trumpsters — I don’t know where these people are from — starting to get involved in local school district races. I think it’s dangerous.”

“School boards, by their nature, are not political organizations,” Robinson said. “People who want to carry their own personal agendas in the school board should stay out of it. This is not the place for that. »

Robinson, however, said he would not support requiring children to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before starting school at this time.

“I think making COVID-19 vaccinations mandatory before kindergarten is going to fly,” Robinson said. “I’m not going to support it, but I’m going to make sure it’s available and parents have a choice.”

Robinson added that if transmission rates increase significantly, “we may have to revisit that.”

Robinson said he played a significant role in reopening the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Academy in Sausalito early in the pandemic. Robinson said his idea of ​​allowing teachers who didn’t want to return to the classroom to teach via the internet helped remove one of the biggest barriers to reopening Marin schools.

DelPan said she would support a COVID-19 vaccination requirement for school children. DelPan said that could mean unvaccinated children would not be allowed to attend public schools in Marin.

“People need to understand that certain actions would have certain consequences,” DelPan said. “It doesn’t take away the parents’ right to say no. They still have a way to educate their children.

DelPan noted that Wyatt’s website claims that “many parents are now choosing to homeschool their children or move them out of California entirely.”

She said some parents have decided to homeschool their children or switch to the private school system, “which is seen as a bit more lax in terms of vaccination rules.” But she said it wasn’t the Marin County School Board’s fault.

DelPan said that although her knowledge of the education system is limited, “I’m the type of person who will dive in and learn as much as possible and be a good contributor.”

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