Boarding School – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:48:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Boarding School – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Wyoming High School Football Week 3 Scoreboard: September 17-18, 2021 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wyoming-high-school-football-week-3-scoreboard-september-17-18-2021/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wyoming-high-school-football-week-3-scoreboard-september-17-18-2021/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:27:52 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wyoming-high-school-football-week-3-scoreboard-september-17-18-2021/ The third week of the pre-season football in Wyoming is Friday and Saturday. Find all your game scores in one place, here! We will be following the games throughout the weekend. These are the scheduled matches, but all times are subject to change. If a game time moves, please email david@wyopreps.com. WyoPreps football rankings for […]]]>

The third week of the pre-season football in Wyoming is Friday and Saturday.

Find all your game scores in one place, here! We will be following the games throughout the weekend.

These are the scheduled matches, but all times are subject to change. If a game time moves, please email david@wyopreps.com.

WyoPreps football rankings for this week

Did you miss our games of the week? Learn more about two matches here.

WyoPreps Big School Game of the Week
WyoPreps Small School Game of the Week

Games are listed in order of start time.

Week 3

Friday September 17th
Class 4A

# 1 Rock Springs at # 2 Sheridan, 6 p.m.

# 4 Cheyenne Est at Laramie, 6 p.m.

Kelly Walsh at # 5 Natrona, 6 p.m.

Cheyenne South in Campbell County, 6 p.m.

Cheyenne Central at # 3 Thunder Basin, 7 p.m.

Send a football score to WyoPreps

Class 3A
Land at Evanston, 3 p.m.

# 5 Star Valley at Rawlins, 5 p.m.

Buffalo at # 1 Cody, 6 p.m.

Riverton at # 2 Jackson, 6 p.m.

# 4 Douglas at # 3 Powell, 6 p.m.

Worland at Green River, 6 p.m.

Send a football score to WyoPreps

Class 2A
Pinedale at Big Piney, 2 p.m.

Mountain View at Cokeville, 3 p.m.

Kemmerer at Thermopolis, 4 p.m.

# 5 Upton-Sundance at # 1 Wheatland, 6 p.m.

Tongue River at # 4 Torrington, 6 p.m.

Newcastle at Big Horn, 6 p.m.

# 2 Lyman at # 3 Lovell, 7 p.m.

Glenrock at Burns, 7 p.m.

Send a football score to WyoPreps

Class 1A-9 Male
Rocky Mountain at Riverside, 1 p.m.

# 4 Wind River at # 5 South East, 5 p.m.

# 2 Pine Bluffs at # 5 Saratoga, 6 p.m.

Moorcroft at # 3 Lusk, 6 p.m.

St. Stephens at # 1 Shoshoni, 7 p.m.

Lingle-Ft. Laramie at Wright, 7 p.m.

Wyoming Indian at Greybull, 7 p.m.

Send a football score to WyoPreps

Class 1A-6 Male
# 3 Little Snake River at Burlington, 2 p.m.

Oppon out of stateent
Sioux County, NE at Guernsey-Sunrise, 7 p.m. (6-Man)

Non-university opponent
Hulett to Sheridan Soph., 2:30 p.m. (6 men)

Send a football score to WyoPreps

Saturday September 18

Class 1A-6 Male
# 4 Dubois at # 1 Meeteetse, noon

# 2 Farson-Eden at Camp # 5, 2 p.m.

Non-university opponent
Natrona Soph. in the Midwest, 10 a.m.

HEM at Natrona Soph. – canceled

Opening date : Kaycee (Week 3 opponent canceled his season)

Send a football score to WyoPreps
WyoPreps Football ranking up to week 2

10 of the most famous Wyomingites in history

We asked our listeners to tell us who they think is the most famous Wyomingite in history, here are the top 10 picks. NOTE: To be a Wyomingite you do NOT need to be born here, but you must have lived here for at least a year.

– 10 of the most famous Wyomingites in history


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The star of the song “The X Factor” was 49 years old https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-star-of-the-song-the-x-factor-was-49-years-old/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-star-of-the-song-the-x-factor-was-49-years-old/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 21:52:37 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-star-of-the-song-the-x-factor-was-49-years-old/ Freddie Combs, whose rising voice made him a fan favorite on TV The X factor music competition, died at the age of 49. He died Sept. 10 in a Florida hospital from kidney failure, his wife, Kay said. Combs was a minister and played in a wheelchair on The X factor. He struggled with health […]]]>

Freddie Combs, whose rising voice made him a fan favorite on TV The X factor music competition, died at the age of 49. He died Sept. 10 in a Florida hospital from kidney failure, his wife, Kay said.

Combs was a minister and played in a wheelchair on The X factor. He struggled with health issues for years, and his wife said TMZ that he weighed up to 920 pounds in 2009. He was featured in 2010 in the TLC series Your love and managed to reduce his weight to a relatively svelte weight of 540 pounds, which it was when he appeared in the second season of Simon Cowell. The X factor in the USA

No more Deadline

In his appearance, Combs’ version of Bette Midler’s “Wind Beneath My Wings” made him stand out, and Judges Cowell and LA Reid gave him their word that they would back him up if he was healthier.

He is soon eliminated from the competition.

“I have so much gratitude for being his wife for 25 years,” said Kay Combs, “and for being his best friend.”

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUpWSD7krSk?version=3&enablejsapi=1&origin=https://deadline.com&rel=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&fs=1&hl=en-US&autohide=2&start=2&wmode=transparent&w=640&h=360]

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Meghan Shogan Charts Career Path Through Solid Rock: With Hammer, Chisels, and Steel Brushes in Hand, Austin Artist is on a Path in Stone – Arts https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/meghan-shogan-charts-career-path-through-solid-rock-with-hammer-chisels-and-steel-brushes-in-hand-austin-artist-is-on-a-path-in-stone-arts/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/meghan-shogan-charts-career-path-through-solid-rock-with-hammer-chisels-and-steel-brushes-in-hand-austin-artist-is-on-a-path-in-stone-arts/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 11:33:27 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/meghan-shogan-charts-career-path-through-solid-rock-with-hammer-chisels-and-steel-brushes-in-hand-austin-artist-is-on-a-path-in-stone-arts/ Meghan shogan (Photo by Jana Birchum) Meghan Shogan is a stonemason. Hammers, chisels, calipers, steel brushes against rough rough rock: Shogan carves stone for her art and she carves stone for a living and sometimes these two areas overlap. Imagine a Venn diagram that’s over half marble, over half limestone, and there’s Shogan in the […]]]>

Meghan shogan (Photo by Jana Birchum)

Meghan Shogan is a stonemason. Hammers, chisels, calipers, steel brushes against rough rough rock: Shogan carves stone for her art and she carves stone for a living and sometimes these two areas overlap.

Imagine a Venn diagram that’s over half marble, over half limestone, and there’s Shogan in the middle – working out of his South Austin studio in the relative nature behind Callahan’s general store, sprinkled rock powder, chipping and scraping a piece of inorganic matter that existed before dinosaurs walked the earth, turning more of this planet’s base material into creative gold.

Imagine a Venn diagram that’s over half marble, over half limestone, and there’s Shogan in the middle, dusted with rock powder, chipping and scraping off a piece of inorganic material that existed before dinosaurs did. roam the earth, turning more of it from the basic material of the planet into creative gold.

Shogan ran Vault Stone Shop, on South Congress Avenue near St. Elmo Road, for a time – from May 2018 to April 2021 – using the venue as a residence and base of operations, hosting the work of other artists. premises in the intimate space even when she was plying the dirtiest part of her meticulous trade elsewhere. The gallery officially debuted with the 2019 East Austin Studio Tour, then … group shows with the works visible through the huge storefronts of Vault Stone Shop. Paintings and drawings, engravings and prints, even the strange more than two-dimensional object, adorning the hall of the gallery for the pleasure of the public stroll. Works by Navasota Sering, Saul Jerome E. San Juan, Darcie Book, Virginia Fleck, Ender Martos, Jade Walker, Valerie Chaussonnet, Steef Crombach, Jeffrey Primeaux and others, all arranged for graphic impact and providing respite from the Relentless Zoom- Restricted exhibitions of creativity embodied. Month after month after the pandemic masked month.

And here we are now, in the second year of our plague, with an ongoing struggle with the variants of the virus and only hope of an eventual return to, ah, normalcy. And Vault Stone Shop disappeared, closed, and sold, as Shogan found new ways of life and continued to stumble the rocktastic light in the bucolic backcountry south of the river. She is currently working on a major residential project for some wealthy clients, coaxing the solid material into the precise shapes required by structural imperatives. She tries to take time for her own lithic expressions. Whether for art or for money, she’s been doing what she’s been doing for decades.

But – how did Shogan’s chisel journey through solid earth begin? What attracts a woman to the arduous field of stonecutting in the first place?

“A lot of people ask me that,” says Shogan. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do after high school in Pittsburgh. I wanted to do art, but my family wasn’t too keen on it. I actually went to SCAD for a semester before. to panic and quit. I felt like I was out of place, like they were all art children – and I was not from that background. I come from a family middle class, and they weren’t super artsy – my family is all engineers or a steel mill background – and I felt like I just didn’t fit in.

Meghan Shogan in her studio in East Austin, with a hammer and chisel (above) and cut limestone (left) (Photo by Jana Birchum)

But even that work was not set in stone – or set in stone.

“I moved to Arizona,” Shogan says, “and did a bunch of great outdoor jobs – trail work and stuff like that. I did a season of firefighting and decided I really liked the practical stuff. And then a friend of mine told me about a college in Charleston, South Carolina, where you could learn the trades of traditional construction. And I was really interested in old buildings and architectural history and old monuments and things like that; I was interested in stone. And they have all kinds of programs – you can choose from wood, plaster, stone, metal. So I ended up going. “

The American College of the Building Arts in Charleston is where the woman who most recently carved a book in Texas limestone first hit the literal books, and literally hit the rocks.

“They are trying to give you everything,” said Shogan. “There is only one path, not many elective courses. It was a very small school – I was the third class to graduate, and we had five graduates. We learned about drawing and computer aided design. We took business courses. We did, like, building science in general: construction management, math, all that. The main emphasis was on stone carving in the workshop.

And it’s called masonry, right? Not like the fraternal mystical order or something else, but real stonemasons?

The artist nods. “So, for a piece of stone that is going to go on a building, there are two different kinds of masons: the one who Make this stone, and the one who to install this. But at school we did a lot of brick and concrete block laying, a lot of concrete work and stuff too. And, at the time, the college did not have power tools. We did everything by hand for four years. After which, Shogan moved to France, where she joined a cult. Well, sort of.

“There’s this thing called the Tour de France,” said Shogan, “and it’s not bike racing. It’s a trade school situation, where you leave home as a teenager and instead of going to regular high school to get an education, you do. It’s super hardcore, and a lot of people quit – they don’t like the lifestyle, because you have to leave home and go live in boarding houses. It’s very old-school and weird – the French consider them a cult. The students spend a year in a different city each year, in a boarding school, and they move and work during the day and are in class in the evenings and on weekends. It’s a 10-year program, and they have different locations in every city, different companies that they work for, and they travel and do that for seven years. Then they have to build a masterpiece that is accepted, and then they have to give back for three years – as teachers, helping run the residential schools. “

Set in stone: (ld) Fossilized Book, 2019, limestone; Uncle Hat, 2021, marble; Miracle Toaster, 2019, marble and limestone (Art by Art by Meghan Shogan / Photos by Chris Franks)

Shogan, however, did not devote a decade of his life to this program. “I applied for a scholarship, which was offered to Americans, and it was like a step along the way. You could spend a year with a bunch of people who were already in this process. So they threw me away. with the others, and they were all way above my skill level. And the workshop is one of the best in the world, and it’s hard for the French to get into, and I just got there. What made it pretty tough: They definitely told me I shouldn’t be there. But I learned more than I had in the previous four years. I finished by staying a year and a half.

And so ends the lessons, at least formally, for Meghan Shogan. But artists always learn by working, of course, and Shogan learned she could work in Austin. So she moved here in 2012. “To Joseph Kincannon from Kincannon Studios,” she says. “They used to be called Archaic, and it was a little stone carving studio in East Austin, on – Fifth and Pedernales? Joseph is one of the few classically trained stone carvers in the United States, and he did a great job. I really wanted to work for him, and he said he had work for me, so I came to work for him. But eventually the job with Kincannon ended. He lost a big client or didn’t have enough work for everyone – just enough for himself, really. ” So Shogan turned to construction.

“I kind of snuck into a corporate office and worked my way up,” she says. “And, well, I was a project manager and a site superintendent. But all the while, I felt, it took me so long to learn stone carving, and I put so much heart and soul into it, and I’m not ready to give it up.

Which led to greater engagement with the local artistic community. And Shogan’s participation in the EAST and Northern-Southern Gallery exhibitions – such as the late 2019 exhibition “WORK PLAY MONEY LOVE WHAT IT IS WHAT COULD BE BOTH NEITHER ART DESIGN” which revealed the Fossilized book cut in Texas limestone. And at Vault Stone Shop.

“Northern-Southern’s Philip Niemeyer was super nice from the start,” says the stonemason. “He said, ‘Come on’, and made me some tea, and we sat and chatted and thought and had some good conversations. He asked me to be a part of this’ Work / Play “. I met a ton of people and made a lot of friends, and I feel like I’m part of the community now. Sean Gaulager from Co-Lab has a barn behind Callahan’s that he rents, and there’s a bunch of people sharing it. There’s an arborist and a few carpenters and other people, and now I also have a store space there – just a patch of land , really. And a toolbox, and a few shelves. I want to build it and have a workshop there. And I really want to do more of these books. I don’t do almost anything abstract. It’s either architectural. , for a building, and someone else designed it and everything has to be cut down to the millimeter. Or, personally, I like magical realism – where the object looks a bit real but i There is something weird about this. Like this book, or the marble cowboy hat. “

And carving rocks for a living? Create enduring works of complex beauty from such a ruthless material? It’s a bit magical too, isn’t it?

Shogan shakes his head, his golden hair moving in vertical planes.

“The stone is dirty,” she said.

A version of this article appeared in print on September 17, 2021 with the title: Trajectory in stone


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History: Graduates of the Chilocco Indian School https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/history-graduates-of-the-chilocco-indian-school/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/history-graduates-of-the-chilocco-indian-school/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 15:03:57 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/history-graduates-of-the-chilocco-indian-school/ Chilocco Indian School graduates The Chilocco Indian School, in New Kirk, OK. was founded in 1884 and has remained open for almost a century. Indian students from all over the country were sent there – some by force – to learn trades, such as carpentry, car mechanics, agriculture or housekeeping. But some alumni have broken […]]]>

Chilocco Indian School graduates

The Chilocco Indian School, in New Kirk, OK. was founded in 1884 and has remained open for almost a century. Indian students from all over the country were sent there – some by force – to learn trades, such as carpentry, car mechanics, agriculture or housekeeping.

But some alumni have broken away from stereotypical careers and carved out a unique niche for themselves.

One of them was actor Wes Studi (Cherokee), a graduate of Chilocco 1964.

Wes studio

His specialty was dry cleaning – but he really cleaned up in Hollywood, where he starred in many notable films – including “Hostiles”, “Dances With Wolves”, “Last of the Mohicans” and “Avatar”.

He also played Navajo Police Officer Joe Leaphorn, a character created by author Tony Hillerman.

Studi, who is also a Vietnam veteran, recently received an Oscar for Lifetime Achievement.

Chilocco can also claim the first full-fledged Native American to play in Major League Baseball – Moses “Chief” Yellow Horse. But Yellow Horse’s brief baseball career would also lead to a decades-long rift between him and the Pawnee tribe.

Yellow Horse was born in 1898 in Indian territory (Oklahoma did not become a state until 1907). Like many indigenous people in the area, Yellow Horse was taken from his family at a young age and sent to boarding school. This is where Yellow Horse discovered baseball.

Yellow horse

In 1917, Yellow Horse gained attention as a pitcher when he compiled an outstanding 17-0 record for Chilocco. After leaving Chilocco, Yellow Horse pitched for travelers to Arkansas and, in 1920, led the team to their first championship.

In 1921, Yellow Horse was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates. He won five games before sustaining a serious arm injury. He returned to the team the following year, but his season ended with another arm injury. Rumor has it that he was injured when he fell while intoxicated.

On the Pirates, Yellow Horse befriended the future Hall of Famer Rabbit Maranville – who introduced the young man to alcohol. Yellow Horse began to drink heavily, which caused the Pawnee tribe to move away from him.

Although Yellow Horse played several more years in minor league baseball, arm injuries ended his career. He returned to Oklahoma, working menial jobs.

Then, in 1945, he stopped drinking cold turkey. He was re-embraced by his tribe and lived the rest of his life without touching another drop of alcohol. Cheval Jaune died in 1964.

Page resident Reuben D. Begay, Sr., (class of 1963) was such a remarkable student that his Chilocco teachers wanted him to attend medical school. But Begay – who reads Carl Sagan, for fun! – chose not to leave his native country. He retired after nearly 30 years as a chemist for the Navajo plant.

His wife, Bernice Austin-Begay, was also fortunate enough to leave Dinetah. After graduating from Chilocco in 1965, she was offered the opportunity to join NASA, but turned it down. Austin-Begay spent 48 years as a teacher, the last 22 as the first Navajo language teacher for the Page Unified School District. She is the daughter of famous Navajo healer Buck Austin.

Other notable Chilocco graduates include three Medal of Honor recipients – Jack Montgomery and Ernest Childers, for WWII service, and Charles George (Korean War) – two former Seminole presidents, Mitchell Cypress and Howard Tommie, silversmith Pawnee Marlene Riding-In Mameah, Navajo Code Talker Keith Little and professional football player William “Lone Star” Dietz.

The first Navajo to graduate from Chilocco was Bertha Shipley in 1915.


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Afghan refugee’s plan to attend Catholic school in Arkansas halted https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/afghan-refugees-plan-to-attend-catholic-school-in-arkansas-halted/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/afghan-refugees-plan-to-attend-catholic-school-in-arkansas-halted/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 20:10:36 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/afghan-refugees-plan-to-attend-catholic-school-in-arkansas-halted/ LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Shadab, 18, was ready to leave Afghanistan to travel nearly 7,500 miles to begin his final year of high school at the Subiaco Academy – a Benedictine high school that is both a day school and a boarding school – just before the Takeover of Afghanistan by the Taliban. The student […]]]>

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Shadab, 18, was ready to leave Afghanistan to travel nearly 7,500 miles to begin his final year of high school at the Subiaco Academy – a Benedictine high school that is both a day school and a boarding school – just before the Takeover of Afghanistan by the Taliban.

The student knows six languages ​​and had high hopes of studying at an American college next year.

The college prep environment and stimulating curriculum at Subiaco Boys’ School attracted him after a simple internet search of American schools. He knew that was where he wanted to study; he applied and was accepted.

But in a month, his whole world has changed.

“We have no future,” Shadab said bluntly, with a hint of desperation in his voice during a phone call from Pakistan to Arkansas Catholic, the diocesan newspaper in Little Rock, on Aug. 31.

Shadab, who preferred to use only his first name, was denied his student visa for a second time on August 26.

“I have no future, my younger sister has no future because I can no longer go to school. As an immigrant in Pakistan, I do not have the right to do my school in Pakistan, ”he said. “My visa was refused, I cannot go back to Afghanistan because I also have American documents with me. I’m afraid now. I’m not afraid anymore.”

Shadab’s fate is familiar to countless young people after the Taliban overtook Afghanistan on August 15, entering the capital of Kabul as President Ashraf Ghani fled. The United States withdrew its last troops on August 30, after 20 years.

Shadab was born in the Afghan province of Ghazni as a Hazara Muslim. Representing only 9 percent of the population, the Hazaras are one of the religious minorities most persecuted by the Taliban, according to Amnesty International.

The family moved to Kabul when he was 7 years old.

“This move was also due to the Taliban, because we did not have access to primary rights, such as having a good school with high quality education,” he said.

Shadab explained that for most Afghan children there were “no typical nights and days” for his family. There was no family vacation, as traveling carried its own risk of being killed by extremists.

Her uncle and grandfather were murdered by the Taliban in Ghazni. He declined to go into the details of what happened.

“We’re from Afghanistan, we have the right to go to any city we want, like for a picnic or something like that, but we couldn’t do that because we were killed.” , Shadab said. “There are so many examples of Hazara people being killed on the roads. We do not have access to our fundamental rights as human beings.

Although he lives in a country with few opportunities, Shadab felt more secure in Kabul and had hope for his future.

He had spoken with the principal and some of the teachers in Subiaco and said they were encouraging and motivating. He planned to study business administration at university and chose the Subiaco Academy because of his business and economics courses.

Marion Dunagan, deputy director of enrollment management at Subiaco Academy, said Shadab was “the kind of kid Subiaco really wants.”

“Academically, he is exceptional,” she said. “We’re looking for students who are already well-rounded – he ticks all the boxes to be a terrific student academically, culturally, athletically; he has been ranked nationally as football player in Afghanistan. “

Shadab’s student visa was first refused on July 6 and then again on August 26. He traveled to Pakistan because the US Embassy in Afghanistan was closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I traveled to Pakistan by land, crossed the border and saw them. I saw them with my own eyes,” he said of the Taliban soldiers. “It was dangerous; looking at their faces was dangerous. Everyone is afraid of dying.”

Despite all the papers, he was told he was refused because he did not have “strong ties to my country,” he said.

“I had all the acceptance documents, all the relevant information,” Shadab said. “I was shocked when my visa was refused because the Americans (were leaving) many, many, many people from Afghanistan without having a single document, from the airport. But I had all the documents.”

Dunagan contacted the office of Senator John Boozman (R-Ark.) On several occasions regarding this situation and said his office was very gracious to contact the embassy prior to the student’s visa interview. She has not heard from after the second denial.

Boozman spokesman Matthew Wester said in a September 1 email that the office is working with the school to help with the prospective student’s visa application process. “This matter is ongoing and our office remains engaged in the search for a resolution,” he said.

Dunagan said she was terribly worried for Shadab and his family – her parents and younger sister.

For now, Shadab is staying in Islamabad with friends of his family. He does not reside in Pakistan and therefore cannot enroll in school. He cannot return to his family in Afghanistan for fear of retaliation from the Taliban. Currently, the borders are closed.

“I’m worried about them and disappointed with the situation. I just can’t express my feelings. It’s hard to see that your family is in pain, and I can’t do anything … For a student, that is. It’s too hard to handle these big responsibilities. It kills me every day to think about all of this, “Shadab said.” And given my situation in Pakistan right now, there is nothing I can do for them. So it’s heartbreaking for me, and it’s difficult. I’m just worried and praying and that’s it. “

With his own future in danger, Shadab worries the most for his 14-year-old sister.

“I saw the news. They say they will allow girls to study in universities and schools, but I’m not sure,” he said.

“The Taliban are the old Taliban. They haven’t changed. Their faces haven’t changed, their style hasn’t changed, their way of speaking hasn’t changed.

The Taliban did not allow women to drive, learn English or go to school.

“She’s still young and oh my god she’s so scared,” he said of his sister. “I know what she was hoping for in her future. I know that and all (the girls), suddenly it changed.”

“I was hoping for a better future in the United States. At the moment, there is no plan for me. I have lost my motivation,” he said with a sigh.

Shadab said the only thing he hopes the Arkansans will do is raise their voices for the Afghan people who cannot.

“They are losing their loved ones every day,” Shadab said. “We are afraid … They have to raise their voices and defend us against the Taliban. That’s all I want.”


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Fans are delighted with the return of Brophy-St. Marie’s rivalry https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fans-are-delighted-with-the-return-of-brophy-st-maries-rivalry/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fans-are-delighted-with-the-return-of-brophy-st-maries-rivalry/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 21:14:06 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fans-are-delighted-with-the-return-of-brophy-st-maries-rivalry/ Brophy College Preparatory won the last two games (2011 and 2012) in the longstanding rivalry with St. Mary’s Catholic High School by a combined score of 121-6. Both schools will play on Friday evening. (Photo by Harrison Zhang / Cronkite News) St. Mary’s and Brophy Prep have played 55 times since 1959, with the Knights […]]]>

Brophy College Preparatory won the last two games (2011 and 2012) in the longstanding rivalry with St. Mary’s Catholic High School by a combined score of 121-6. Both schools will play on Friday evening. (Photo by Harrison Zhang / Cronkite News)

St. Mary’s and Brophy Prep have played 55 times since 1959, with the Knights leading the rivalry with 30 wins. (Photo by Harrison Zhang / Cronkite News)

PHOENIX – A historic rivalry between two Catholic schools will be renewed Friday night as the Brophy Broncos and St. Mary’s Knights face off in the first week of the 2021 school football season.

Schools have faced each other 55 times since 1959, but not since 2012.

“It was two Catholic schools together and one wants the prominence of being good at all sports,” said Frank O’Dwyer, who was part of the 1959 Brophy team that beat the Knights 20-18. in the first match of the rivalry.

Schools share an interesting and interwoven history.

Brophy College Preparatory, a Jesuit boarding school founded in 1928, closed in 1935 due to the Great Depression, prompting its male students to enroll in the valley’s other prominent Catholic high school, St. Mary’s, which s’ was converted to a girls’ school when Brophy opened.

Related story

During the transition, the Brophy boys brought their green sports gear, forcing the Knights to change their school’s colors from red to green. Brophy reopened in 1952, but it needed to be creative because its future rivals had taken on its school colors.

Brophy bought used sports equipment from the University of Santa Clara, the colors of which are red and white, and adopted Santa Clara’s mascot – the Broncos. Although Brophy players and fans alike eventually embraced the change, the loss of their beloved green was a sore spot that fueled the new rivalry.

The early duel seemed to favor the Knights, especially under coach Pat Farrell, who played for St. Mary’s from 1967 to 1969, winning two championships. Farrell then coached the Knights from 1978-2000, and again in 2003-07, leading the winning rivalry as a coach with 18 wins.

Farrell understood what it means to be successful both as a coach and as a player and knew there was a certain belief among the players that brought them up.

“You threw records and anything can happen on any given night, that was our belief,” he said. “It was that underdog attitude that I learned as a player with a sign that was always hanging in our dressing room, ‘We may not be the greatest, but we have a firm belief that we could to be the best. ‘

“And it was this challenge in front of you that you were going to do whatever it took to be the best. This attitude started in the 60s, which I was fortunate to be a part of, and it established the best tradition of all for finding a way to win a game.

It’s an attitude that led to Farrell’s great success as a St. Mary’s coach. Under Farrell, the Knights won four state titles and had a historic run in rivalry, beating Brophy 16 times in a row from 1980 to 95. The rivalry, Farrell said, was based on the competitiveness between players and players. They have connections to each other, but more importantly, the intensity and the mentality of “it wasn’t so much to win, you just hate to lose it”.

St. Mary’s starting quarterback Nick Martinez will lead the Knights offense in a new chapter in their Brophy Prep rivalry on Friday night. (Photo by Harrison Zhang / Cronkite News)

But the rivalry wouldn’t be what it is today without the nearby community that for decades has linked two schools just two miles from each other in central Phoenix.

“With great rivalry, that only happens if schools, teams, crowds and parents get into a competitive spirit, and that’s what they did,” said Farrell. “There was a lot of it from 4pm with the grills cooking and when you entered the pitch the smoke covered everything. Everyone took their seats at 6pm and as soon as you got out of the locker room you heard some noise and it was electric.

“It hasn’t happened at any other game in your life, including the state championships. It has become something special not only because of the teams, but also the communities involved.

The rivalry extended far beyond football, and for O’Dwyer, that first victory would have an impact for years to come.

“We had a great mood at Brophy and you can feel it in the stands,” said O’Dwyer. “They were excited about the game (against St. Mary’s) and what the team could do because we had a good team. We had to be tested and that test was St. Mary’s.

Both schools have undergone many changes over the years, from structure to class sizes. Since 2000, the Knights have won only two of their clashes against the Broncos. In 2010, they moved from AIA Division 6A to 4A as the Broncos attempted to become a 6A powerhouse.

They stopped facing each other again in 2012 due to the widening competitive gap. But Brophy coach Jason Jewell, now in his third year, called St. Mary’s coach Jose Lucero when he was hired last year to congratulate him on his work. That phone conversation turned into something bigger.

Brophy coach Jason Jewell, now in his third year, will lead the Broncos in the renewed rivalry. (Photo by Harrison Zhang / Cronkite News)

“I called him to congratulate him on getting the job at St. Mary’s because one is my friend and two is a graduate of St. Mary’s,” Jewell said. “Then we started talking about how cool it would be to play and we had a scrum last year. It didn’t happen because of COVID stuff, but after their season ended it said, “Let’s make it a real game” and (it) took me a few seconds to say yes.

With the game once again a reality, support from both sides has been significant with alumni rallying to their teams. The environment, camaraderie, friendships and families stretching back decades – all combine to make this a much anticipated kick-off to the season.

“For both schools, and I know I’m definitely speaking for St. Mary’s, we felt this game should be on the schedule,” Lucero said. “The support from the alumni has been great and people are really excited for the game. We made some special shirts for the game and they sold out instantly, so they are doing more.

“We felt it was a game that should always be played. It’s a big rivalry for a lot of people in our community. Their favorite memory comes from playing Brophy and that atmosphere, ”he said.

The Knights are hoping for a repeat of last year, when they returned to the state playoffs and won their first playoff game in 21 years. It won’t be easy for the Knights, but they’ll be focusing on something that could pay off big every Friday.

“We know we’re not going to be the biggest, the strongest or the fastest on Friday night,” said Lucero. “What we really care about at St. Mary’s is having kids who play football in a disciplined way. It’s one of those things that we lean on either side of the ball to play football the right way.

“It’s not about just one guy here, but the collective at the end of the day,” he said.

Brophy Prep assistant coach Kurt Warner will lead the Broncos game this season. (Photo by Harrison Zhang / Cronkite News)

As for the Broncos, they are looking to bounce back from a 0-7 season that ended prematurely in order to protect their players from COVID-19. The team are excited for the season ahead with senior quarterback Elijah Warner returning from the injury he sustained last season and the squad facing fewer restrictions from the pandemic.

“Our buy-in has been fantastic since the end of last season, not only from the players but from our administration giving us more access to the weight room and things like that that we didn’t have. during COVID, ”Jewell said. “Our numbers in terms of depth and number of children in our program are better than they have ever been and our strength is better than it has been in a long time.

“We have 43 seniors, 40 juniors, 50 sophomores and 130 freshmen for football, so we are approaching 300 kids in the program. When I first took over in 2019 they had 189 so the growth has been there since I was hired and this senior class is something special, ”he said.

Both historic programs aim to make the rivalry the spectacle it once was and couldn’t be in the spring when the two schools faced off in basketball. COVID-19 restrictions limited crowd size and a return to normalcy seemed far away.

It will take time for the rivalry to reach its glory days, but when kickoff tonight at Central High School – Brophy’s new home ground for now – there will be a rich history and little love lost between the two parties.


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Covid-19: school bubbles make the most of a unique locking experience https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/covid-19-school-bubbles-make-the-most-of-a-unique-locking-experience/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/covid-19-school-bubbles-make-the-most-of-a-unique-locking-experience/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 23:15:46 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/covid-19-school-bubbles-make-the-most-of-a-unique-locking-experience/ RNZ may have found one of the biggest bubbles in the country – Whanganui Collegiate School, which kept nearly 100 students and staff in place during the lockdown. Members of the Solway Girls College bubble. Photo: Provided At least 19 boarding schools are in the same position and will remain in these unique school bubbles […]]]>

RNZ may have found one of the biggest bubbles in the country – Whanganui Collegiate School, which kept nearly 100 students and staff in place during the lockdown.

Members of the Solway Girls College bubble.
Photo: Provided

At least 19 boarding schools are in the same position and will remain in these unique school bubbles throughout Alert Level 3.

Whanganui Collegiate School principal Wayne Brown said the school, which had on-site accommodation for staff and their families, made the most of its unique location.

“We have our online learning that we do, we have afternoon activities, we make sure we do fitness, we have games, we have downtime opportunities, there are movies there. night, and we obviously have dining for dinner, ”he said.

“We have a great opportunity to connect with each other, there is fun, there is space and we are very lucky.”

He felt that it was probably one of the biggest bubbles in the country and that the decision to allow some students to stay was necessary.

“Other than probably the nursing homes, hospitals and prisons, I really think we would probably be up there for one of the biggest bubbles, last year and this year, in the country,” he said. -he declares.

“For our national students, according to the directives of the ministry, they had to go home. The only ones that we have kept here are the students who do not have the possibility to return home and these are the students who live abroad. . “

The principal of Solway Girls College in Masterton, Janine Tupaea, has temporarily left her home to help boarding staff look after the remaining 10 students.

She said it was the right decision when the country quickly moved into containment.

“From sitting there and suddenly hearing that we were going into lockdown that night, my immediate thought turned to our students in boarding school, and I knew they would hear this news worrying them.

Whanganui College

Whanganui College College
Photo: Provided

“So I quickly put on some work clothes, got back to school and let the students, families and the boarding team know that I was on my way home. school and that I would meet all the students in the dining room to reassure them that we would keep a bubble open so that all the students were taken care of and that none of the families had to worry ”, a- she declared.

“I met the girls in the dining room and just reassured them that no matter what, we would take care of them.

“I had to make decisions on the spot, that’s why I thought to myself and my kids will move in here, we’ll take care of you.”

From nine to three, students spend their day taking online classes, and at the end of the week, they host a Zoom assembly live from the school hall.

It was Tupaea’s idea to do things a little differently at last Friday’s assembly by asking students to host a surprise flash mob for their friends watching online.

“So I started assembling as I normally would and said we had a special price to start assembling and that would be a price for an exceptional scholar from our Solway bubble.

“I said, ‘the recipient is Miss Fiu’ and then we put her in the spotlight with the camera as she approached to receive the award and then we all burst into a flash mob,” she declared.

Solway Girls College boarding supervisor Sela Emily Fiu-Poufa said that while she missed her family and the comforts of her own bed, there was nowhere else she would rather be.

“It’s different and I miss home, but it’s also home,” she said.

“In the hostel, we try to make life as warm as possible for them, a home away from home. It’s a huge responsibility but it’s really rewarding because you can see the growth of these girls. “

Fiu-Poufa took care of helping with activities such as movie nights, campfires and treasure hunts.

She also plays in the school bubble’s Jump Jam video, which they recently posted on their Facebook page.

The school is urging other boarding schools who pass the lockdown together to post their own Jump Jam video as a friendly challenge.

As the flash mobs and game nights continue, the arrival of level three has also given these Masterton students something to smile about.

Manager Janine Tupaea has promised them a series of take-out meals to celebrate.


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NJ private schools scramble to fulfill staff vaccine mandate https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nj-private-schools-scramble-to-fulfill-staff-vaccine-mandate/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nj-private-schools-scramble-to-fulfill-staff-vaccine-mandate/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 14:23:04 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nj-private-schools-scramble-to-fulfill-staff-vaccine-mandate/ Leaders at New Jersey’s private schools were scrambling to figure out how they would fulfill a new term announced by Gov. Phil Murphy that requires all employees to be vaccinated against COVID. The ordinance applies to all public, private and parochial preschool programs and elementary and secondary schools, including charter and Renaissance schools. This includes […]]]>

Leaders at New Jersey’s private schools were scrambling to figure out how they would fulfill a new term announced by Gov. Phil Murphy that requires all employees to be vaccinated against COVID.

The ordinance applies to all public, private and parochial preschool programs and elementary and secondary schools, including charter and Renaissance schools.

This includes anyone employed by a school full or part time – administrators, educators and pedagogical support professionals, persons providing food, child care or administrative support services, substitute teachers, contract employees and other employees of the school. school. The deadline for getting vaccinated is October 18. Those who do not get the vaccine will be tested once or twice a week, at a minimum, the governor said.

Principals from Don Bosco Prep, a Catholic boys-only high school in Ramsey with around 900 students, were in a meeting all afternoon Monday after the work on the logistics of the order was announced.

“We followed all the protocols that the governor mandated,” said the director, Fr. Abraham Feliciano. “Whatever is required for the safety of our young people, we will do it. “

Feliciano said Don Bosco was open most of the last school year, despite the pandemic.

“Our school has been very diligent about COVID protocols and has gone above and beyond,” he said. “A tremendous amount of energy is devoted to ensuring that students can have as normal an experience as possible. “

At Delbarton, a boys-only school in grades 7 to 12 in Morristown, principal Fr. Michael Tidd said principals were still digesting the mandate.

“Right now, we are studying Governor Murphy’s statement to see what it means for us,” he said. “But we will fully comply as we have with all previous COVID requirements. “

Some private schools that NJ Advance Media contacted this week said many of their staff were already vaccinated so the tenure would not be a burden.

A spokesperson for The Pennington School, a private day school and boarding school for sixth to 12th grade students in Pennington, said “our faculty was already almost 100% vaccinated before this term.”

Deputy principal Ashraf Eisa of Alghazaly School, an Islamic institution in Jersey City, said he was not concerned about the tenure because all of his teachers were already vaccinated. They didn’t have to be in school, teachers took it upon themselves to get the vaccine, he said.

The Archdiocese of Newark, which oversees 73 schools in Bergen, Essex, Hudson and Union counties, said it plans to share more information in the coming weeks on the state’s mask mandates and vaccines.

“With the start of the 2021-2022 school year fast approaching, our school administrators are working diligently to finalize the plans as we once again offer full-time in-person learning for our Catholic elementary and secondary students. “Said Maria Margiotta, spokesperson. for the diocese. “We were grateful to be able to offer this same level of Catholic education over the past school year and we recognize the importance of in-person teaching. “

There are 1,362 private schools serving 209,881 students in New Jersey, according to Private School Review. About 44% are affiliated with a religion. The largest concentrations of private schools in the state are found in Lakewood (71), Jersey City (30), Edison (23), Trenton (23), Newark (22) and Princeton (22).

NJ Advance Media contacted at least 10 private schools in Lakewood. Administrators declined to comment, did not resend messages, or were unavailable.

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Allison Pries can be reached at apries@njadvancemedia.com.


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Rwanda: Staff and students of only Afghan girls’ boarding school flee to Africa https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rwanda-staff-and-students-of-only-afghan-girls-boarding-school-flee-to-africa/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rwanda-staff-and-students-of-only-afghan-girls-boarding-school-flee-to-africa/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 11:25:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rwanda-staff-and-students-of-only-afghan-girls-boarding-school-flee-to-africa/ The move came days after the Taliban toppled the government in Afghanistan, where girls and women were barred from education when Islamist militants were last in power.

“Last week, we completed the departure from Kabul of nearly 250 students, faculty, staff and their families,” said Shabana Basij-Rasikh, who co-founded the School of Leadership Afghanistan (SOLA) in the Afghan capital.

“Everyone is on their way, via Qatar, to the nation of Rwanda where we intend to start a semester abroad for all of our students,” Basij-Rasikh said in a statement. series of tweets.

The school president said she hoped they could all return eventually. “Our resettlement is not permanent … When circumstances on the ground allow, we hope to return home to Afghanistan. For now, I ask for the confidentiality of our community,” she wrote.

Basij-Rasikh is highly decorated and co-founded the school when she was still a teenager, “with the mission of providing access to quality education for girls in her country of origin”. according to the school site.

Her messages came days after she reported burning student files “not to erase them, but to protect them and their families.”

Basij-Rasikh recounted how in 2002, a few months after the fall of the Taliban following the US-led invasion, many Afghan girls were invited to participate in a placement test because the militants had burned down. the files of all the students to erase their existence. . She wrote that she was one of those girls.

The Taliban have taken control of Afghanistan.  What does this mean for women and girls?

S
he was six when the Taliban came to power and was enrolled in a network of secret classes to complete his studies.

“I was scared. I didn’t want to continue. I didn’t want to be killed by the Taliban. My parents were always the ones who insisted,” she said. CNN’s Christiane Amanpour in a 2012 interview.

Shabana says it was her father who inspired her to go to school, telling her, “You can lose everything you have in your life. Your money can be stolen. But the only thing that will always remain with you, that’s what’s here. And he was pointing his head. And he said, ‘Your education is the biggest investment in your life. Never regret it.’ “

This experience prompted her to create SOLA, which means peace in the local Pashtun language. In her Twitter feed published on August 20, she wrote: “As the world focuses on the drama – these Afghans who manage to get out of it – the fire in me to invest in the education of Afghan girls who have no way out becomes more and more shining, stronger and stronger, ”she wrote. added
The Ministry of Education in Rwanda said he was looking forward to to “welcome the SOLA community in Rwanda for your study program”.

Uganda welcomes Afghan refugees

SOLA’s relocation to Rwanda comes amid the arrival of the first group of evacuees from Afghanistan to neighboring Uganda.

The 51 Afghans disembarked Wednesday morning in Uganda aboard a private chartered flight, according to a statement from the country’s foreign ministry.

US announces new destinations for evacuees as Kabul airport confusion continues

The new arrivals will stay temporarily in the East African country before being resettled elsewhere.

Uganda will welcome “Afghan nationals at risk and other nationals in transit to the United States of America and other destinations around the world,” the statement said.

Uganda will host 2,000 Afghan refugees for three months following a US request, according to Minister of State for Relief, Disaster Preparedness and Refugees Esther Anyakun Davina.



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Girls’ school founder in Afghanistan escapes with students, burns files https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/girls-school-founder-in-afghanistan-escapes-with-students-burns-files/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/girls-school-founder-in-afghanistan-escapes-with-students-burns-files/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 19:14:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/girls-school-founder-in-afghanistan-escapes-with-students-burns-files/ The co-founder of the only private boarding school for girls in Afghanistan said on Tuesday that nearly 250 students, faculty, staff and family members had managed to leave the war-torn country and would temporarily relocate to Rwanda for a “semester abroad” for the entire body of study. “SOLA (School of Leadership, Afghanistan) is relocating, but […]]]>

The co-founder of the only private boarding school for girls in Afghanistan said on Tuesday that nearly 250 students, faculty, staff and family members had managed to leave the war-torn country and would temporarily relocate to Rwanda for a “semester abroad” for the entire body of study.

“SOLA (School of Leadership, Afghanistan) is relocating, but our relocation is not permanent,” Shabana Basij-Rasikh tweeted. “A semester abroad is exactly what we are planning. When circumstances on the ground allow, we hope to return home to Afghanistan.”

Basij-Rasikh also thanked the governments of Qatar, Rwanda and the United States for helping the girls escape.

“My heart is breaking for my country,” she added. “I stood in Kabul and saw the fear, anger and fierce bravery of the Afghan people. I look at my students and see the faces of millions of Afghan girls, just like them. , who remain behind. “

Basij-Rasikh tweeted videos of herself on Friday burning school records and the files of young women at her school amid terror of what a return to Taliban rule might mean for women. Basij-Rasikh said she burned the documents to protect the students and their families from the terrorist group.

“In March 2002, after the fall of the Taliban, thousands of Afghan girls were invited to go to the nearest public school to take a placement test because the Taliban had burned all the student files for erase their existence. I was one of those girls, ”Basij-Rasikh said. “Almost 20 years later, as the founder of the only girls ‘boarding school in Afghanistan, I burn my students’ files not to erase them, but to protect them and their families.”

Since taking control of Afghanistan, the Taliban have attempted to reshape their image and present themselves to Western journalists as a kinder, gentler extremist group that will respect women’s rights within the confines of Sharia law, although they did not provide any details on their new reading of Islamic law. . When the Taliban was last in power in the 1990s, their hard line led to severe mistreatment of women. Women had become second-class citizens with very few or no rights. The girls were taken out of school. And as if that wasn’t enough, almost all the schools exploded or were riddled with bullets.

Basij-Rasikh, who was born and raised in Kabul, was only 6 when the Taliban banned girls from receiving an education.

Rather than give in to their demands, her family dressed her and her sister as boys and sent them to a secret girls’ school in Kabul. They knew the stakes were high, and if caught they could be killed. But they also knew the importance of education.

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Basij-Rasikh attended high school in the United States as part of the YES exchange program and graduated magna cum laude in 2010 from Middlebury College in Vermont. After graduating, she returned to her homeland and co-founded SOLA, the first private boarding school for girls run by Afghans.

Since the Taliban takeover, she has begged the outside world to keep the girls stuck in Afghanistan in their minds.

“These girls can’t go, and you can’t look away. If there’s one thing I ask of the world, it’s this: don’t take your eyes off Afg. Don’t let your attention wander. over the weeks. Look at these girls, & in doing so, you will hold those who hold power over them to account, ”she said.

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Key words: New, Taliban, Afghanistan, War in afghanistan, Taliban, Gender issues, Education, Rwanda, Foreign police, Refugees

Original author: Barnini’s Chakraborty

Original location: Girls’ school founder in Afghanistan escapes with students, burns files


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