Boarding School – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:43:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Boarding School – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Netflix Wednesday TV Review https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/netflix-wednesday-tv-review/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:30:18 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/netflix-wednesday-tv-review/ A Pair Of Goth Icons Get Trapped In A Generic Teen Supernatural Drama On Netflix Wednesday. The two directors Tim Burton and The Addams Family his daughter Wednesday Addams gets lost in this series full of intrigue which takes place in a boarding school for “outcasts”. It’s a little Gossip Girl and a little Harry […]]]>

A Pair Of Goth Icons Get Trapped In A Generic Teen Supernatural Drama On Netflix Wednesday. The two directors Tim Burton and The Addams Family his daughter Wednesday Addams gets lost in this series full of intrigue which takes place in a boarding school for “outcasts”. It’s a little Gossip Girl and a little Harry Potteras well as decades of forgettable The CW series, held together primarily by Jenna Ortega’s pitch-perfect performance as the titular character.


Wednesday itself remains distinctive, but almost everything else Wednesday could fit in a series that has nothing to do with The Addams Familyy. Much has been written about the casting of Luis Guzmán and Catherine Zeta-Jones as Wednesday’s parents, Gomez and Morticia, but they only appear in two of the Wednesday‘s eight episodes, and Fred Armisen only makes one appearance as Uncle Fester. The most prominent on-screen Addams aside from Wednesday is Thing, the disembodied hand who becomes Wednesday’s loyal sidekick as she investigates strange happenings at rural Nevermore Academy.

RELATED: Wednesday Welcomes Christina Ricci and Uncle Fester in New Kooky Trailer

Wednesday-Addams-Gomez-Morticia-Nevermore

An essential part of the Addams Family’s appeal, whether in 1960s TV series, the director’s 1990s films Barry Sonnenfeldor the recent animated moviesis how they stick together, presenting a united front against the world. Wednesday shatters them almost immediately, as 15-year-old Wednesday is expelled from her last school after dropping piranhas into the pool. His parents decide to send him to Nevermore, a Vermont enclave where Gomez and Morticia first met when they were college students. Wednesday doesn’t like being expected to follow in her parents’ footsteps, and she’s no more comfortable among the eccentrics at Nevermore than she was in a regular school. .

While the Addams have always been known to be “scary, goofy, mysterious, and spooky”, they’ve usually existed in an enhanced version of the real world. Wednesday changes all that, making Nevermore the home of vampires, werewolves, mermaids, and other supernatural creatures and giving Wednesday psychic visions that allow him to see the future. These visions place her right in the middle of an investigation into mysterious monster attacks that have occurred near Nevermore and the adjacent town of Jericho.

RELATED: Netflix’s Wednesday Being Latin Is Meaningful – But Not For The Reasons Fans Think

Wednesday Addams supported by her Nevermore peers

The primordial supernatural mystery about Wednesday is mildly engaging at best, and creators Alfred Gough and Miles Millar (Smallville, The Shannara Chronicles) limiting the comedy to occasional one-liners that Ortega delivers with perfectly withering deadpan. The climb scream queen (X2022 Scream) makes a worthy successor to the Wednesday portrait painter of the 90s Christine Ricci. Ricci appears here in a largely unremarkable role as Marilyn Thornhill, the only “normal” teacher at Nevermore. Gwendoline Christie, as Nevermore principal Larissa Weems, gets the showiest adult role, positioned as an adversary for Wednesday.

Burton, whose goth-cute aesthetic is a perfect match for Sonnenfeld’s films, directs the first four installments, but his impact is so minor that the switch to different directors is almost impossible to discern. Wednesday is better than Burton’s previous take on a YA-style story about a school for the misfits, 2016’s dreadful Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, but it’s just as generic – Ortega’s presence aside. Regular Burton collaborators Danny Elfman and Colleen Atwood serve as composer and costume designer respectively for the first episode, giving it a bit of Burton’s signature ornate style, but they share credits with others in later episodes, and the style becomes less distinctive.

RELATED: Wednesday Addams has the best opening since Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

The genius of cartoonist Charles Addams’ original Wednesday design is evident in the largely bland supporting cast of fellow Nevermore students and other teenagers, including a pair of potential love interests for Wednesday. Emma Myers makes the strongest impression as Wednesday’s supernaturally perky housemate, Enid, an exceptionally optimistic werewolf who struggles with her lycanthropic transformations. Wednesday’s Classmates subplots generally feel like filler, filling out episodes to extend the mediocre mystery to the finale.

There are occasional references to the past Addams Family productions, including a double clap to open a secret passageway and one of Wednesday’s suitors asking “Did you ring?” like Butler Addams Lurch when she summons him. Jericho is home to the colonial-themed attraction Pilgrim World, which Wednesday offers the chance to make somber observations about American history, like in Sonnenfeld’s most memorable scene. Addams Family Values. These cursory touches aren’t a substitute for appearances by key members of the Addams Family, and they come across as superficial fan service.

For all the characters who emphasize the idea that the students of Nevermore are weird, Wednesday is unfortunately conventional. There’s nothing weird about the serialized mystery’s familiar beats or the teenage relationships of Nevermore. The weirdest moment Burton delivers is a throwaway moment at a school dance when Wednesday finally breaks loose and switches to the music in a groovy retro fashion. It has nothing to do with plot or world-building, but it is elegant and ironic, as Wednesday’s stone-faced expression contrasts with his fluid dance moves. It’s the kind of morbid clumsiness that a Addams Family adaptation must be fulfilled.

Wednesday’s eight-episode first season premieres Wednesday, November 23 on Netflix.

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The Ambiguous and Organic Abstract Paintings of Madeline Mikolon https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-ambiguous-and-organic-abstract-paintings-of-madeline-mikolon/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 01:25:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-ambiguous-and-organic-abstract-paintings-of-madeline-mikolon/ If a brushstroke cannot be erased or covered, then each that comes after is an addition, a readjustment, a response. Madeline Mikolon, an artist from Missoula, builds her abstract paintings with an organic palette, movement by movement, on the unforgiving support of paper. If you are going to Madeline Mikolon’s show runs through December at […]]]>

If a brushstroke cannot be erased or covered, then each that comes after is an addition, a readjustment, a response.

Madeline Mikolon, an artist from Missoula, builds her abstract paintings with an organic palette, movement by movement, on the unforgiving support of paper.

After moving here, his paintings referred to the landscape indirectly, with titles like “Ravine”. The connection is looser now and she prefers people to read the work as they wish.

“I really like this idea of ​​suggestion, of guessing, of getting caught up in something but not being able to put my finger on why,” she said. “I think they take on their own personality.”

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They have enough visual information that they can “change over time and with different views,” she said.

Mikolon is showcasing new work through the end of December at Smithblack Furniture, an upscale boutique located in the 2000 block of South Higgins Avenue.

Nora Van Stelten, the shop’s co-owner, studied art at university and presents solo exhibitions when the opportunity arises. People can see the work in a home environment. From a design point of view, she thinks it would be strange to have a shop with well-designed furniture on the floor and mass-produced “faux” art on the walls.

building blocks of Mikolon’s work are puddles of watery organic color, overlapping and accentuating each other. Threading their borders, accenting, and intersecting are well-rendered lines. Some waver and move forward seemingly of their own volition, like a river drawn on a map.

Mikolon’s more recent pieces show a shift in surface from canvas and wood panel to paper.

Mikolon completed the last two years of high school at a boarding school that had formal art classes, then enrolled at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. The first year of the foundation courses was rigorous and she quickly began to move towards abstraction. After living in New York for a long time, she moved to Missoula.

In college, she was influenced by Bauhaus artists, with exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art. Ernesto Caivano, a Spanish artist based in New York, captivated her. She closely follows an Australian artist, Adam Lee, she says. Things she sees in museums or stumbles upon while traveling might inspire her.

“These ongoing conversations about art have had more impact for me,” she said.

Paper has many virtues, but one of its qualities is transformative: once a mark is made, it cannot be erased, covered up and obscured. Instead, she approaches composition in a step-by-step fashion: marks are made, then adjustments. Additions but not replacements, a problem-solving process.

“You can always change it by adding more brands, changing the brand, making it bigger. I like to work with what I have and build on it,” she said.

The pieces begin with a few marks in acrylic, ink, gesso, mixed inks, watercolor wash.

Ombre, pale cyan and translucent grays come together in some pieces, almost looking like macro photographs. The water will stay within the limits it has set in advance. In some of the works, straight lines, full or implied, contrast with more organic shapes.

Either way, they leave a lot to the viewer.

“I am interested in the associations that occur, whether it is a space, a landscape or an object, or even feelings, something that happened, a memory “, she said.

“I’m always interested in landscape and organic form in general – rocks, plants, light,” she said. Natural shapes also tend to involve the viewer a lot.

“If you look at an organic shape, like say a rock, up close they tend to start mimicking landscapes,” she said.

She has noticed that her palette changes with the seasons, and this work, done mostly in spring and summer, is heavy on yellows and greens, in a way that seems directly connected to the natural world.

A piece called “Bramble/Reeds” hangs above a bed. A large horizontal piece, which she thought was somewhat “explosive”, although the effect was not expressively violent like the typical brushstrokes of abstract expressionist painting. The darker shades are spaced out throughout, but they’re not true black. She loves dark browns or other tones and the effect they can have.

“Even adding a purple or a blue can really change his personality,” she said.

“There’s definitely that balance in making this stuff,” she said. “Things can get too overwhelming and you balance them out.”

A work in progress can “blow up again, and you put the brakes on it,” she said. “It’s kind of a conversation between the two.”

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3 schools train the next generation of female leaders https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/3-schools-train-the-next-generation-of-female-leaders/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 05:24:13 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/3-schools-train-the-next-generation-of-female-leaders/ Inclusion, diversity and individuality are three things schools can champion to cultivate a safe space where children and teens can thrive. Why is this important? Mainly because a strong sense of openness brings out the best in girls and boys of all ages, which can ultimately lead to academic and personal success. A tailor-made academic […]]]>

Inclusion, diversity and individuality are three things schools can champion to cultivate a safe space where children and teens can thrive. Why is this important? Mainly because a strong sense of openness brings out the best in girls and boys of all ages, which can ultimately lead to academic and personal success.

A tailor-made academic path allows students to learn from an early age that success can take many forms. By taking charge of their progression, they grow into courageous and compassionate leaders who are ready for the future and what awaits them beyond the four walls of a classroom.

This level of empowerment is especially crucial for young girls. By joining a vibrant school, they gain broad exposure to the life skills, education, and sisterhood needed to break glass ceilings. Fortunately, many schools around the world focus strictly on transforming ambitious girls into strong women by equipping them with the skills to lead. Read on to find out why these three stand out:

St. Andrew’s Schools

Zoom into scenic Honolulu, Hawaii’s capital, and you’ll find the only school in the state to offer a coordinated K-6 curriculum, a one-of-a-kind educational experience designed to help boys and girls achieve the most at any age. Honoring their founder, Queen Emma Kaleleonālani Naʻea Rooke, and with values ​​deeply rooted in their Hawaiian and Episcopal heritage, St. Andrew’s Schools are an enduring testament to her towering vision to provide an extraordinary education for her people.

Source: St. Andrew’s Schools of Hawaii

Now with one mission and three schools – The Priory, K-12 all girls; Preparation, K-6 all boys; and Queen Emma Preschool, coeducational ages two to five – the school nurtures each child’s growth in a stimulating yet supportive environment that celebrates friendship, connection and scholarship.

Small class sizes allow teachers to focus on each child’s academic, social, and emotional learning by providing highly personalized attention to each. In this way, St. Andrew`s cultivates the unique talents of its students, so that they become the best version of themselves and lead meaningful lives. 100% of high school graduates participate in The Priory in the City program, which provides authentic work experiences through an internship as a multi-level extension of the classroom. Students also have access to Global Leadership Center (GLC) which engages students in the world around them by actively investigating global issues that affect humanity. The GLC program aligns with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. By fulfilling specific criteria in addition to their regular graduation requirements, students can earn a Global Leadership Award upon graduation.

All high school students have a college counselor/career coach who works with them in course selection throughout high school to better position themselves when applying to colleges that interest them. The ESL programme at St. Andrew’s Schools provides developmentally appropriate instruction for language acquisition from K-12. To learn more about St. Andrew’s, Click hereand if you would like to apply for admission, please Click here.

Melbourne Girls’ High School

Melbourne Girls’ High School (MGGS) is a medium-sized school with carefully planned structures to ensure that each girl is known and appreciated as her own person. Within the school, students are cared for as unique young adults with developmentally appropriate programs for ELC, Junior, Middle and Senior Year girls.

Schools for girls

Source: Melbourne Girls’ High School

Committed to female empowerment and inspirational passion, this Australia-based girls’ day school and boarding school nurtures young female leaders with a global perspective and a socially conscious approach to their future.

How do they do that? By providing the best resources to their students. MGGS features world class facilities across two purpose-built and thoughtfully designed campuses. The latest technology, learning spaces and specialist interests at both campuses allow every girl at Melbourne Girls Grammar to fully explore a diverse and contemporary curriculum that offers exceptional opportunities for personal growth and development.

The Merton Hall campus includes a chapel, gymnasium, library, dining hall, specialist arts, theater and science centres, assembly hall, multi-purpose sports fields and a rowing facility located at nearby on the banks of the Yarra River. The Guesthouse (which accommodates around 80 students) and the enrollment office are also located on the Merton Hall campus.

Branksome Hall Asia

It may be the only IB continuum school for girls in Asia, but Branksome Hall Asia feeds little boys and girls in her co-ed Primary school. The first stage is the Early Years Curriculum, which kicks off the educational journey with a structured, play-based approach. It lays the foundation for problem-oriented, technology-driven learning in later years.

Schools for girls

Source: Branksome Hall Asia

The school serves students from kindergarten through 12th grade. It is the school’s mission to develop students into global learners and leaders, prepared for the challenges and opportunities they will encounter in a rapidly changing, interdependent world.

To achieve these goals, the school offers a rigorous academic program, hires a diverse and highly qualified professional staff, and maintains world-class facilities and state-of-the-art learning environments. The challenging lessons delivered in this learning environment will stay in the minds of students as they head into the real world, fully prepared for their future.

A testament to their prowess, Branksome students have consistently achieved enviable results, placing them at the forefront of international schools in all of Northeast Asia. During this time, many graduates have been admitted to top universities around the world, including the University of Cambridge, Cornell University, Brown University, and the London School of Economics, to name a few.

*Some of the schools featured in this article are business partners of Study International

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Native American history remembered and celebrated at the event https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/native-american-history-remembered-and-celebrated-at-the-event/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 21:58:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/native-american-history-remembered-and-celebrated-at-the-event/ Kansas City Indian Center Food Pantry Coordinator Jason Swartley ends his presentation with a prayer during an event honoring Indigenous peoples hosted by Clay Countians for Inclusion at the Garrison School on Saturday, Nov. 5 2022 at Liberty. Emilie Curiel ecuriel@kcstar.com On Saturday, Liberty’s Garrison School welcomed a few dozen visitors, to engage in a […]]]>

Kansas City Indian Center Food Pantry Coordinator Jason Swartley ends his presentation with a prayer during an event honoring Indigenous peoples hosted by Clay Countians for Inclusion at the Garrison School on Saturday, Nov. 5 2022 at Liberty.

Kansas City Indian Center Food Pantry Coordinator Jason Swartley ends his presentation with a prayer during an event honoring Indigenous peoples hosted by Clay Countians for Inclusion at the Garrison School on Saturday, Nov. 5 2022 at Liberty.

ecuriel@kcstar.com

On Saturday, Liberty’s Garrison School welcomed a few dozen visitors, to engage in a series of conversations about the ongoing struggle of Indigenous peoples.

The day saw a mix of heavy-hearted memories and urgent calls to action.

Gaylene Crouser, Hunkpapa and Oglala citizen and director of the Kansas City Indian Center, took to the stage to tearfully discuss how Indigenous peoples have been stripped of their culture. Society has a long way to go in its progress towards equality, she said.

“The education system in this country is woefully inadequate when it comes to talking about Indigenous peoples,” Crouser said. “It’s three pages in fourth grade and three pages in eighth grade…and then pretending we don’t exist anymore, but we do exist. And we are still here.

The event, titled “Recognizing History, Reclaiming Culture”, was organized by Clay counts for inclusion, an educational group of over 100 members. The seminar was held in honor of Native American Heritage Month and as part of an ongoing conversation about the treatment of Indigenous peoples.

Speakers from the Kansas City Indian Center, as well as author Pat Streng, gave presentations. Members of other groups, such as the Thidaware Native American Garden, were also present.

Many topics were highlighted, including concern over the effect that mascots such as Kansas City chiefs have on the treatment of Native American communities.

Kansas City Indian Center program director Jason Swartley wore a t-shirt with the iconic Chiefs crest on it. The word “NOPE” was pasted over it in bold, capital letters.

Swartley said teams that mimic Native American culture dehumanize people rather than honor them. He said the franchise does not work with local Native American groups to his knowledge, although he wants to.

“As long as there have been representations of Indigenous people, there have been misrepresentations of Indigenous people,” Swartley said. “It’s something that is harmful and has always had to be dealt with.”

Part of the Not in Our Honor coalition, Swartley and other locals demonstrate outside the stadium before games in hopes the team will make a change.

Swartley argued that making someone of another ethnicity a mascot would likely be considered offensive, although many organizations have claimed Native Americans as their team emblem. He also said Indigenous peoples are subject to higher levels of prejudice and violence.

Before Swartley, Crouser worried about how boarding schools, such as the Shawnee Indian Missioncreated a generational trauma.

“A friend of mine recently said that if you know a Native American, he’s either a residential school survivor, or a child of a residential school survivor, or a grandson of a residential school survivor. boarding school,” she said. said.

While the Kansas Historical Society recently announced that the Shawnee Indian Mission grounds would be searched for children who may have been buried there, Crouser said she wished the Shawnee tribe had been consulted during the process of initial planning. Now, she says, she hopes the children can finally be buried.

“There are families who are still waiting for their children to be honored,” Crouser said.

KCM_ICEvent_110522_EJC_003
Gaylene Crouser, executive director of the Kansas City Indian Center, gets emotional while speaking about Indigenous children in boarding schools during an event honoring Indigenous peoples hosted by Clay Countians for Inclusion at the Garrison School on Saturday, November 5, 2022, at Liberty. Emilie Curiel ecuriel@kcstar.com

A leaflet placed on tables around the room highlighted the Indian Residential Schools Policy Truth and Healing Commission Act, a bill sponsored by Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren. The law would require diligent searches of records and attempts to locate children buried in boarding schools.

Crouser spoke about the importance of the legislation, urging the group to lobby lawmakers to push it forward. She also pointed to a second piece of paper scattered around the room, this one explaining India’s child protection law.

That legislation is set to be challenged in the Supreme Court on Wednesday, in a case called Haaland v. Brackeen.

Crouser said the law is necessary because it prevents Indigenous children from entering the child welfare system when foster placements are available and appropriate. She believes that placing Indigenous children in foster care rather than with loved ones strips them of their cultural identity.

Pat Streng, author of “Native American Resilience: A Story of Racism, Genocide and Survival,” shared insight into his years of research with the group.

Streng said the education system was over the mass genocide of Native Americans in the United States and that uncovering the truth was a tumultuous journey for Streng.

“This book took me a long time to write,” she said. “I cried a lot and was very angry.”

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Pat Streng, the author of “Native American Resilience,” spoke about his experience writing his book at an event honoring Indigenous peoples hosted by Clay Countians for Inclusion at the Garrison School on Saturday, 5 November 2022 at Liberty. Emilie Curiel ecuriel@kcstar.com

But anger and concern weren’t the only emotions in the room on Saturday. Speakers acknowledged their pride in the strength and perseverance of Indigenous peoples. Swartley ended the event with a Dakota thank you song.

“It’s a miracle that each of us still has our language — that we still have our songs,” Crouser said. “And it didn’t happen by accident. There were many people who came before me… They gave their lives for this.

This story was originally published November 5, 2022 4:58 p.m.

Kansas City Star Related Stories

Jenna Thompson covers breaking news for The Kansas City Star. A native of Lincoln, Nebraska, she previously worked for the Lincoln Journal Star and is a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she studied journalism and English.

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Underground History: Let’s Go Public! https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/underground-history-lets-go-public/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 21:09:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/underground-history-lets-go-public/ While I can’t argue with a good hat, I can say that we as archaeologists need to do a better job of sharing our work with the public. Much of the archaeological work conducted in places like Oregon and California is on public land or publicly funded, and the sites we uncover provide important information […]]]>

While I can’t argue with a good hat, I can say that we as archaeologists need to do a better job of sharing our work with the public. Much of the archaeological work conducted in places like Oregon and California is on public land or publicly funded, and the sites we uncover provide important information about the history of the communities in which we live. As archeology can contradict, supplement or contribute to the documentary record, our findings can be important and should be shared widely whenever possible. Over the past few decades, the field has made great improvements in how we interact with the public and how data is shared. However, while big discoveries are easy to share with enthusiasm, some of the more subtle discoveries can be difficult to fit into the mainstream historical narratives around us. Communication is a skill in general, and communicating scientific data without your audience’s eyes fixing it is an even more specialized business.

Luckily for us, there’s a class for that! We were joined by Doug Wilson on a recent episode of Underground history for a discussion on the 2022 Public School of Archeology at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. The field school was a collaboration between Portland State University, Washington State University, and the National Park Service (NPS) and focused on the original school site in Fort Vancouver, a British fur trading fort located just across the Columbia River from Portland. Wilson described the fort as the “colonial capital of the Pacific Northwest,” and the annual field school not only provides important data that adds to our understanding of this dynamic period, but also teaches the next generation of archaeologists how to have nuanced conversations with the public about the complex history of our region. The school that was the focus of this season’s program was the first boarding school for Native Americans and Métis (Aboriginal and European heritage), and designed to force their assimilation into the mainstream culture. This element of the site centered children’s often overlooked experience of Fort Vancouver’s history and gave visitors to the site a better understanding of the physical and structural manifestations of settler colonialism.

While Fort Vancouver is an ideal location for archaeological work to take place in full view of the interested public, not all sites are safe or accessible, and not all projects can incorporate the time and effort required to raise awareness or interact with visitors (pro tip: if you’re visiting an archaeological site, never ask if we found gold or dinosaurs, but Indiana Jones references are fine). As more archaeologists opt for greater transparency and openness when it comes to their work, Portland State University is certainly leading the way in our region. Their annual Archeology Tour has been providing hands-on exhibits to the public since 2012, with opportunities to meet archaeologists and learn about their work in Portland, Bend and Burns each summer. The program has gone virtual over the past two years, leading to a robust website filled with interesting and interactive content. Whether in person or online, Archeology Roadshow is a valuable resource that demystifies archeology and introduces Oregonians to the fascinating history of our region. The more opportunities people have to learn about how material heritage and history surrounds us, the more engaged they will be in preservation and stewardship. Hopefully the Archeology Roadshow will hit the road again next summer, but in the meantime you can explore the exhibits online at the Archeology Roadshow website.

While much of the public is happy to see archaeologists working or hearing about their finds, others want to dig. Don’t worry, there’s a program for you too! The Oregon Archaeological Society (OAS) is a nonprofit organization that trains volunteers in the methods and ethics of archaeological work through courses, lectures, and other outreach programs. Their archeology training programs are for people who want to work with professionals on archaeological digs, and SOULA regularly hosts OAS members on our projects. The group also offers an “Archaeology for the Curious” course, which allows attendees to hear lectures from a range of scholars conducting work across the state. To learn more about these courses and more, visit the OAS website. With all of these resources at your disposal, there’s no need to visit Egypt to get your archeology fix!

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The stepfather remains a timely satire of traditional values https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-stepfather-remains-a-timely-satire-of-traditional-values/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-stepfather-remains-a-timely-satire-of-traditional-values/ Watching Terry O’Quinn descend into a murderous fury The Stepfather is akin to watching a storm brewing: from the start, there is no doubt about his sanity, his moral character, or his ability and willingness to commit heinous crimes to protect his fragile belief, but while his mask of timid domesticity begins to crack, revealing […]]]>

Watching Terry O’Quinn descend into a murderous fury The Stepfather is akin to watching a storm brewing: from the start, there is no doubt about his sanity, his moral character, or his ability and willingness to commit heinous crimes to protect his fragile belief, but while his mask of timid domesticity begins to crack, revealing the insidious face beneath it’s impossible to look away. Thanks largely in part to O’Quinn’s monumental performance, the film works like a slasher picture, if campy at times. But the real meat on the bones of the movie is the layered script. As The Stepford wives, The Ice Stormand Vivarium, Joseph RubenThe 1987 slasher tackles contemporary suburban life while putting together a poignant message. Hidden under the freshly mowed lawns of Step-fathermuch like the metaphorical hordes of beetles crawling viciously through Blue Velvetis a horrifying truth: the preservation of a traditional American family and all of its values ​​invariably comes at a price.

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What is “The Stepfather” about?

Step-father is a violent and biting satire of Reaganist values ​​and those who blindly protect them. Jerry Blake (Terry O’Quinn) is a traditionalist at heart, a man of simple pleasures. More than anything, he would love to sit down for a good Thanksgiving dinner with his loving family. He barbecues, is hospitable, and gives speeches of gratitude when his friends and neighbors show up. He builds birdhouses and sticks them on his lawn. He spends time looking sane and innocent Mr. Ed reruns laughing out loud. These squeaky clean features don’t last, however. They can not. It depends too much on others staying as unquestionably true to his traditionalism as he does. Blake’s passivity is circumstantial. He is pleasant only when things correspond to his ideal.

In an instant, Blake became a pillar of his community, a walking image of the ideal Ward Cleaver father. In another, he is a whirlwind, an almost unstoppable force that tears through all that opposes him in psychotic fury. He has a perverse obsession with maintaining his traditional family. The idea that he is dissolving into something else bothers him to the point of violence. For Blake, the greatest threat to her idyllic suburban life comes from within: her daughter-in-law, Stephanie, a shrewd young woman and symbol of modernity and clarity, feels uneasy about the arrival of Blake in the family. Still in mourning for her father and undergoing increasingly dramatic outbursts at school, she brings up the suggestion of going to boarding school. It just won’t be enough. He won’t allow it.

RELATED: Jean Rollin’s European cult horror ‘The Night of the Clocks’ is wonderfully bizarre and personal

Blake’s alleged love for Stephanie is off-putting. She is expected to embrace him like a parent, to love him as she would a father. There’s no room in his family of Christmas cards for anything else. If she goes to boarding school, there is no family. It’s just a wedding. And so Blake’s beloved tradition disintegrates. What is best for her as an individual does not interest her. He is much more interested in booking the family unit by any means necessary.

Despite his traditional values, Blake will do anything to keep his family ‘perfect’, even kill them

By the time he utters a single line of dialogue, we already know what he’s capable of. He’s already slaughtered a family, his family, children and all. In the first scene of the film, he is seen going through the bloody aftermath while happily whistling “Camptown Races” as if he was simply going for a morning walk, as Pierre Lorre hissing “In the hall of the mountain king” between the murder of children in M. From there, he abandons his identity, takes a ferry, and leaves for a suburb of Seattle in hopes of trying again.

Under her new identity, Blake meets the widowed Susan Maine (Shelly To hack), mother of a teenager named Stephanie (Julie Schoelen), and the two quickly marry, much to the chagrin of his new stepdaughter. Blake gets a job selling houses to family men who, at least on the face of it, are living the kind of life he approves of. They are married. They have children. They work good, honest jobs and are American taxpayers, family men, true models of tradition. He sees homes as places to start a family. Halfway through the image, Stephanie’s psychiatrist (Charles Layer) poses as a single man looking for a house in order to arrange a screening with Blake and analyze it. Only, Blake is shocked by the idea that a man without family buys such a residence. “Houses like this really should have a family,” he says.

That’s all it is to Blake: family. It stays true to the outdated family models of 1950s television where men, women and children have pre-established roles in the home and in society at large. That’s all he cares about. When he kills, he does it for a purpose, however twisted. This isn’t some mindless slasher smashing its way through a cul-de-sac like an embodiment of pure evil. He wants-Needseven – to maintain its carefully constructed image of a happy American family, the kind you’d see on Christmas cards and in half-faded Polaroids.

While discussing the recent horrific murders he clerk (incognito, of course, since no one knows he’s a killer under his secret identity), he coolly shrugs with an explanation, “maybe they let him down.” This is as simple a pattern as possible. The house of cards he had precariously built had crumbled and he had no interest in salvaging the consequences. For him, it’s useless. The dream is over, the illusion dissolved. His former family, no longer of any use to him, is just getting rid of, and the cycle repeats itself when he meets the Maines.

With Maines, Blake fails to carve his perfect home, though it’s not for lack of trying. The recurring image of the birdhouse symbolizes Blake’s intention to create a quaint home for himself and his family. Unlike a real family, a birdhouse can be built perfectly and flawlessly. He can stand on his lawn and proclaim to anyone who sees him that a happy family lives there. Ironically, this is how Blake also builds his families. It is a facade. There is nothing there. He grasps in vain concepts that are destined to change. In reality, there is nothing wrong with Stephanie going to boarding school. In fact, it would probably be good for her. It could give her the space she needs to mourn her father, to become an adult. But this does not respect tradition.

Boarding school is an arbitrary plot point that could have been any number of things while still retaining its importance. It’s not the boarding school itself, but the very concept that Stephanie would leave her “parents” alone that bothers Blake. He has the same disdain for the idea that Stephanie is getting old. Her growing interest in romantic things also bothers Blake, as seen when he finds her kissing her boyfriend (I f Schultz) on the doorstep one evening. Ruthless and stern, Blake steps in and breaks off the tender moment in disgust. “You could go to jail…that girl is sixteen years!” Blake threatens. “So I am!” replies the boy shyly.

Blake has no patience for the boys with his new daughter

Stephanie sharing her first kiss with her boyfriend is an innocent moment. They are two young people with a common love interest. As teenagers, they do like teenagers and express their affection and attraction through physical means. However, Blake sees this as something perverse. He is stuck in his old-fashioned ideologies where such behavior is vulgar. For him, this goes against the primordial meaning of life: to found a family, a classic family, and to live with it for the rest of his life. That’s all he wants to do. That’s why he works, that’s why he keeps a job and that’s why he sells houses. “Sometimes I really believe what I’m selling is the American dream,” he cheerfully tells his friends and neighbors at his barbecue, and he’s absolutely means this. But, it is why they call it the american dream, like george Pug always says “because you have to be asleep to believe it”.

Blake has no ability to accept the fact that the traditional American family is largely outdated. Times are bound to change, and change, while daunting, is often a good thing. Letting go of certain traditional American values ​​– or concepts that once made the country what it is, for better or for worse – offers the country and all its inhabitants new opportunities. It enables education. It allows insertion. It allows people to listen to other opinions, ideas, concepts. It allows people to become more tolerant, less strict and uncompromising in their ideals.

However Step-father critically reflective of the Reagan-era politics of returning to tradition, its satirical edge will continue to retain its bite as long as such unwavering devotions to tradition endure. Blake’s obsession with past eras is eerily familiar to the great waves of the contemporary political landscape. Cries for a return to vaguely defined glory days force a misunderstanding of progress, vilifying a procedure that is by its very definition something beneficial.

“The Stepfather” Isn’t a Time Capsule From a Long Time Ago

In 2022, Step-father is not a time capsule from a distant era, it is a sober and truthful reflection of the damaging nature of traditionalism. Through Blake’s psychotic rampage, there’s something to be learned: Change is inevitable, and it’s often a good thing. We can learn from the past. We can improve on it.

At the end of Step-father, Blake fails to preserve his concept of family. His wife and daughter-in-law overcome his tyrannical rule and together they build something different but better. They don’t care about keeping things the way they were just for the sake of preservation. Instead, they can move on and thrive. Blake’s very existence is a facade built on barbaric violence and he doesn’t mind dishonesty. That’s all he knows. When, after overcoming the imminent threat of violence from her stepfather, Stephanie tears down the birdhouse they had both erected, she frees herself from the constraints of an idyllic but false lifestyle. It’s a liberating moment and something to be inspired by.

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Missouri Military Academy hosts active-fire exercise https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/missouri-military-academy-hosts-active-fire-exercise/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:17:33 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/missouri-military-academy-hosts-active-fire-exercise/ EDITOR’S NOTE: A misspelled name has been corrected. MEXICO, Mo. (KMIZ) The Missouri Military Academy held an active-fire exercise on Wednesday, to test their response should an intruder enter a building. The private boarding school for boys has more than 200 students. Most students live in the barracks on campus. There are over 250 security […]]]>

EDITOR’S NOTE: A misspelled name has been corrected.

MEXICO, Mo. (KMIZ)

The Missouri Military Academy held an active-fire exercise on Wednesday, to test their response should an intruder enter a building.

The private boarding school for boys has more than 200 students. Most students live in the barracks on campus. There are over 250 security cameras across campus and an operations center from which all cameras are accessible.

The exercise included a man entering the building with a NERF gun.

The event was planned long before the school that shot a St. Lycée Louis on Monday morning. Two people were killed at Central Visual and Performing Arts High School, seven were injured.

“Today’s exercise is about the safety and security of our cadets and personnel,” said Richard Geraci, president of the Missouri Military Academy. “It’s an ongoing process that helps us make those plans the best we can. The only way to do that is to practice and make sure everyone knows what to do in those situations. .”

Geraci stressed the importance of communication during exercises like this, so if an emergency were to occur, everyone is on the same page.

“We want to work with local law enforcement and EMS to familiarize them with the protocol,” Geraci said. “It is important for them to know the layout of our school and our facilities.”

Soldiers from the Missouri State Highway Patrol were at the school to observe the drill, as was County Audrain Emergency Management Director Carl Donaldson.

Audrain County Emergency Management is responsible for creating and developing emergency operations plans to protect county residents from disasters.

“This school is definitely unique, but it’s no different from any other school,” Donaldson said. “This institution exists to educate its students. Incidents like the one we trained for today exist in any school, and it is important that we do these drills to test our plans.”

In the event of an active shooter, some students play a role in responding to the crisis.

“Some students can be a squad leader or a business leader,” Geraci said. “Because of this, they are responsible for knowing where their classmates may be at all times. This keeps students accountable and there for their fellow students.”

MMA senior Anthony Melick is a band company commander at school, which means he’s a leader who takes responsibility for other peers by making sure everyone is accounted for.

“It’s important that we train even if there is a small chance of that happening,” Melick said. “We have to be prepared.”

There were about 20 people involved in the planning of this security event.

“We know we have to keep doing these drills to find our gaps and weaknesses in order to tighten them up,” said Major Thomas Roberts, a security officer.

According to Roberts, there were things he saw that needed improvement, but he thinks the exercise went well.

“There are some things we absolutely need to do better,” he said. “However, we train and just by doing it, we improve.

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Saturday Soapbox: A Closer Look at the Fort Simcoe Residential School | Opinion https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/saturday-soapbox-a-closer-look-at-the-fort-simcoe-residential-school-opinion/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/saturday-soapbox-a-closer-look-at-the-fort-simcoe-residential-school-opinion/ Students and eyewitnesses who lived at the Fort Simcoe school between 1860 and 1920 told a somewhat different story than that of the “unsanitary conditions”, “degradation” and “atrocities” alleged by the editorial board of the YH-R on October 9. Many students have thrived there and come out of school healthy and intelligent while keeping their […]]]>

Students and eyewitnesses who lived at the Fort Simcoe school between 1860 and 1920 told a somewhat different story than that of the “unsanitary conditions”, “degradation” and “atrocities” alleged by the editorial board of the YH-R on October 9.

Many students have thrived there and come out of school healthy and intelligent while keeping their native language skills intact and retaining their traditional religious values ​​for the rest of their lives. As adults, former students proudly represented their indigenous culture while vigorously advocating for tribal rights using English skills learned in the classroom.

Some examples included George Waters, Tecumseh Yahatowit, Thomas K. Yallup, Louis Mann, George Olney, Dan Boone, William Charley, Alex and Alba Shawaway, Kiutus Jim, Watson Totus, Celia Yumpty Totus, and Kate Tahchinch Williams.

Likewise, dozens of hard-working teachers and school staff have dedicated their lives to meeting the educational, nutritional and emotional needs of children who were sung at night by staff members before school time. to sleep. When school ended in June, the children went home to their families and returned in October. Employees and neighbors collected donations to buy Christmas gifts and toys for the children because federal funds were not allowed to be spent on holiday gifts. (Yakima Herald, December 31, 1891.) If a child died, he or she would go home with his family by tradition. When a soldier died at Fort Simcoe, he was taken to The Dalles or Portland, Oregon, or sent home.

Major Robert Garnett’s wife and son died at Fort Simcoe in 1858 and were brought back to New York State. These are some of the reasons why there is no cemetery at Fort Simcoe.

Were there bad employees? Two were identified in the YH-R article published on October 2. School superintendent Samuel Motzer was investigated by American inspectors and fired after 15 weeks of employment in 1889. Former Civil War General RH Milroy’s contract did not not renewed in 1885 partly due to callous, culturally degrading remarks made by him. The remaining 57 years at the school operated under more qualified supervision.

Medical reports from staff doctors confirmed that the schoolchildren were in better health than those living in winter camps.

Students at the school received smallpox vaccinations, regular nutritious meals, warm clothing, shelter, and a balanced regime of domestic and agricultural chores with classroom study.

If there was any healing left to be done in 1955, it may have been appeased when (then adult) former students held a Fort Simcoe school reunion at Satus Longhouse with music, singing and dancing while inviting a special guest, Don M. Carr, former head of the boarding school during its last nine years of operation. (Republic of Yakima, December 15, 1955.)

The U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs published annual reports during the internship years, and these are available in the Yakima Valley Libraries’ Northwest Reading Room and in the National Libraries’ Digital Collection. University of Washington, “Yakama Agency Annual Report.”

Jo N. Miles is an award-winning history scholar and author based in Yakima.

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The grounds of a former Native American boarding school in Kansas will be searching for Native graves https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-grounds-of-a-former-native-american-boarding-school-in-kansas-will-be-searching-for-native-graves/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 16:23:42 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-grounds-of-a-former-native-american-boarding-school-in-kansas-will-be-searching-for-native-graves/ The grounds of a former Native American boarding school in Kansas will be searched to determine if any Native children were buried there, state officials said. The Kansas Historical Society, owner of the Fairway site, contracted with the University of Kansas Research Center to conduct a ground-penetrating radar survey of the 12 acres to search […]]]>

The grounds of a former Native American boarding school in Kansas will be searched to determine if any Native children were buried there, state officials said.

The Kansas Historical Society, owner of the Fairway site, contracted with the University of Kansas Research Center to conduct a ground-penetrating radar survey of the 12 acres to search for unmarked graves.

The current Shawnee Indian Mission historic site was one of hundreds of schools run by government and religious groups in the 1800s and 1900s. Thousands of Native American children were forcibly removed from their homes and placed in such schools, with the aim of assimilating them to American culture and Christianity.

The US Department of the Interior announced last year that it was investigating the treatment of Native American children in boarding schools. A federal report released in May identified more than 500 student deaths at institutions, but officials said the figure is expected to rise into the thousands as research continues.

Chiefs of the Shawnee tribe and other tribes had requested an excavation of the Fairway site. But tribal officials said in a statement that they were not consulted on the Historical Society’s project proposal before it was announced.

“We have requested a formal consultation to address serious concerns about the motives for this project, potential gaps in the process that could render results incomplete, and what plans might be to use the results of the project,” the tribe said. .

Patrick Zollner, the historical society’s executive director, responded that the Shawnee tribe was the “first to know” about the project proposal. He said the company has also contacted other tribes, including the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, Kaw Nation, Osage Nation and others.

Chiefs of the Shawnee tribe have expressed concern in part because it is unclear if any children were buried at the current mission site, which is much smaller than the original property by nearly 2 000 acres. They also fear the project is moving too quickly before the tribe’s concerns can be addressed, spokeswoman Maggie Boyett said.

Zollner and Erinn Barcomb-Peterson, a spokeswoman for the University of Kansas, said consultation with the tribes is ongoing and work will not continue until that process is complete.

A proposed contract for the field study states that the historical society and the university will coordinate with tribes and other entities requesting consultation on the project. Under the contract, field work could be completed next April and a report submitted next summer. Shawnee Indian Methodist Handicraft School was established on its present site in 1939 by Thomas Johnson, a Methodist minister for whom Johnson County was later named. At one time it had 16 buildings and nearly 200 students a year aged 5 to 23.

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Native Americans remember torture and hatred in boarding schools https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/native-americans-remember-torture-and-hatred-in-boarding-schools/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 21:08:51 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/native-americans-remember-torture-and-hatred-in-boarding-schools/ MISSION, SD — After her mother died when Rosalie Whirlwind Soldier was just four years old, she was placed in a Native American boarding school in South Dakota and said her native Lakota language was “Devil’s Talk.” She remembers being locked in a basement at St. Francis Indian Mission School for weeks as punishment for […]]]>

MISSION, SD — After her mother died when Rosalie Whirlwind Soldier was just four years old, she was placed in a Native American boarding school in South Dakota and said her native Lakota language was “Devil’s Talk.”

She remembers being locked in a basement at St. Francis Indian Mission School for weeks as punishment for breaking the school’s strict rules. Her long tresses have been shorn off in a deliberate effort to eradicate her cultural identity. And when she broke her leg in an accident, Whirlwind Soldier said she received shoddy care, leaving her with pain and a lameness that still plague her decades later.

“I thought there was no God, just torture and hatred,” Whirlwind Soldier testified at an event Saturday on the Rosebud Sioux reservation led by U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland , as the agency grapples with the bitter legacy of a boarding school system that had operated in the United States for more than a century.

Now 78 and still living on the reservation, Whirlwind Soldier said she broadcasts her horrific experiences in hopes of finally moving past them.

“The only thing they didn’t do was put us in (an oven) and gas us,” she said, comparing the treatment of Native Americans in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries to the Jewish Holocaust during World War II.

“But I gave up,” she later added. “I’m going to get there.”

Saturday’s event was the third in Haaland’s year-long “Road to Healing” initiative for victims of abuse at government-supported boarding schools, following previous stops in Oklahoma and Michigan.

Beginning with the Indian Civilization Act of 1819, the United States enacted laws and policies to establish and support schools. The stated goal was to “civilize” Native Americans, Native Alaskans, and Native Hawaiians, but this was often achieved through abusive practices. The religious and private institutions that ran many schools received federal funding and were willing partners.

Most closed long ago and none still exist to strip students of their identity. But some, including St. Francis, still operate as schools — albeit with radically different missions that celebrate the cultural backgrounds of their Indigenous students.

Former St. Francis student Ruby Left Hand Bull Sanchez traveled hundreds of miles from Denver to attend Saturday’s meeting. She cried as she remembered being almost killed as a child when a nun stuffed laundry soap down her throat in response to Sanchez praying in her native language.

“I want the world to know,” she said.

Haaland was accompanied by Wizipan Garriott, a member of Rosebud Sioux and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs. Garriott described how the boarding schools were part of a long history of injustices against his people that began with the widespread extermination of their primary food source – bison, also known as buffalo.

“First they took our buffalo. Then our land was taken, then our children, then our traditional form of religion, our spiritual practices,” he said. “It is important to remember that we, the Lakota and other indigenous peoples, are still here. We can go through anything.

The first volume of a survey report released by the Department of the Interior in May identified more than 400 boarding schools that the federal government supported from the late 19th century through the 1960s. It also revealed that at least 500 children have died in some schools, although this number is expected to rise significantly as research continues.

The National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition says it counted about 100 other schools not on the government list that were run by groups such as churches.

“They all had the same missions, the same goals: ‘Kill the Indian, save the man,'” said Lacey Kinnart, who works for the Minnesota-based coalition. For Native American children, Kinnart said the intent was “to assimilate them and rob them of everything Indian except their blood, to make them despise who they are, their culture, and forget their language.”

South Dakota had 31 of the schools, including two on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation – St. Francis and the Rosebud Agency Boarding and Day School.

The Rosebud Agency School in Mission operated until at least 1951 on a site that now houses Sinte Gleska University, where Saturday’s meeting was held.

All that remains of the boarding school is a gutted building that once housed the dining hall, according to tribesmen. When the building caught fire about five years ago, former student Patti Romero, 73, said she and others were on hand to cheer on its destruction.

“No more worms in the chili,” said Romero, who attended school from age 6 to 15 and said the food sometimes got infested.

A second report is pending in the schools investigation launched by Haaland, herself a Laguna Pueblo from New Mexico and the first Native American cabinet secretary. It will cover burial sites, the schools’ impact on Indigenous communities, and also attempt to account for federal funds spent on the struggling program.

Congress is considering a bill to create a “truth and healing commission” for boarding schools, similar to the one established in Canada in 2008. It would have a broader scope than the Department of the Interior’s investigation into federally run boarding schools and subpoena power, if passed.

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