Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Why Chloe from The Young And The Restless really changed her name https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/why-chloe-from-the-young-and-the-restless-really-changed-her-name/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:19:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/why-chloe-from-the-young-and-the-restless-really-changed-her-name/ Esther Valentine was first introduced as Chancellors’ Maid in 1982 and remained in that position for several decades. It was during a brief hiatus in 1990 that she had a one-night stand with a plumber nicknamed Tiny and became pregnant (via Soap Central). She didn’t know Tiny’s real name or any way to find him, […]]]>

Esther Valentine was first introduced as Chancellors’ Maid in 1982 and remained in that position for several decades. It was during a brief hiatus in 1990 that she had a one-night stand with a plumber nicknamed Tiny and became pregnant (via Soap Central). She didn’t know Tiny’s real name or any way to find him, so she resigned herself to the fact that her child wouldn’t know his father. When her daughter was born, Esther named her Kate after her friend and employer Katherine “Kay” Chancellor (via Soaps in Depth). Kate did not often appear as a baby on the show and was soon sent to boarding school at Kay’s expense, not to be seen again until 2008.

Chloe revealed to her new husband Cane Ashby that she was sent to boarding school at a young age and had very little contact with her mother and was raised by strangers. Not only did she resent Esther for sending her away, but she was also embarrassed that her mother was a servant (via Soaps). After graduating, Kate changed her name to Chloe Mitchell, hoping to stand out from her story. However, Kay and her mother recognized her instantly, even though she had changed dramatically in appearance since the last time they saw her.

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A Brief Timeline of Pacific Northwest Boarding Schools https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/a-brief-timeline-of-pacific-northwest-boarding-schools/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 01:10:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/a-brief-timeline-of-pacific-northwest-boarding-schools/ March 3, 1819. The United States Congress passes the Civilization Fund Act to fight “against the continued decline and final extinction of the Indian tribes”. He entrusts “persons of good character” with instructing the Amerindians “in the mode of agriculture adapted to their situation; and to teach their children to read, write and count. January […]]]>

March 3, 1819. The United States Congress passes the Civilization Fund Act to fight “against the continued decline and final extinction of the Indian tribes”. He entrusts “persons of good character” with instructing the Amerindians “in the mode of agriculture adapted to their situation; and to teach their children to read, write and count.

January 22, 1855. The Treaty of Point Elliott, signed at what is now Mukilteo, ceded ancestral Native lands to the United States and created reservations. Among the promises made to the tribes: a doctor, hunting and fishing rights, and an “agricultural and industrial school, free for the children of the said tribes and bands”.

1857. Chirouse asks the snohomish chief, Ns’ski-oos, for permission to live among the tribes. He was given a place to build a house near the mouth of Quil Ceda Creek, where he established the first missionary school. The campus moved the following year, according to local historian Les Parcs.

Father Eugene Casimir Chirouse. (Courtesy of Hibulb Cultural Center)

1866. Chirouse’s pupils grow from 48 to 35. He writes: “Disease has prevailed to a very large extent among the Sound Indians and I am sorry to say that my pupils have suffered much more than before. … As there is no doctor on the reserve, they continue to ask me for medicine, believing that my supply is inexhaustible.

Shortly after Father Eugene Chirouse opened a school for boys in Tulalip Bay, the Sisters of Providence opened a school for girls.  In this undated photo, two nuns stand with more than two dozen students on the steps of their Tulalip mission.  (Courtesy of Hibulb Cultural Center)

Shortly after Father Eugene Chirouse opened a school for boys in Tulalip Bay, the Sisters of Providence opened a school for girls. In this undated photo, two nuns stand with more than two dozen students on the steps of their Tulalip mission. (Courtesy of Hibulb Cultural Center)

1879. Carlisle Indian Industrial School opens in Pennsylvania, requiring students to speak English and embrace settler culture. The famous motto of its founder is to “kill the Indian” and “save the man”.

1881. A report from the Bureau of Indian Affairs states: “The Indian is evidently destined to live as long as the white race, or until he is absorbed and assimilated into his pale brethren. … The only alternative that remains is to prepare him by education for civilized life.

1900. The federal government begins to operate the Tulalip boarding school, ushering in an era of greater cultural repression. Meanwhile, epidemics of smallpox, pneumonia and tuberculosis come in waves, claiming many lives.

Charles Milton Buchanan arrived in Tulalip in 1894, serving first as the reserve's sole physician.  He became the first superintendent of the Tulalip Indian School.  He served as a federal liaison until his death in 1920. (Courtesy Hibulb Cultural Center)

Charles Milton Buchanan arrived in Tulalip in 1894, serving first as the reserve’s sole physician. He became the first superintendent of the Tulalip Indian School. He served as a federal liaison until his death in 1920. (Courtesy Hibulb Cultural Center)

1928. The Meriam Report, or ‘The Problem with Indian Administration’, details rampant abuse in boarding schools, as well as ‘deplorable health conditions’, ‘overcrowded dormitories’ and ‘almost complete denial of normal family life’ .

1932. Tulalip Federal Indian School closes.

Harriette Shelton Dover, a survivor of the federal residential school for Indian children in Tulalip, was credited with restoring the annual salmon ceremony and fighting for fishing rights.  (Courtesy of Hibulb Cultural Center)

Harriette Shelton Dover, a survivor of the federal residential school for Indian children in Tulalip, was credited with restoring the annual salmon ceremony and fighting for fishing rights. (Courtesy of Hibulb Cultural Center)

May 2022. A year after launching an official investigation into history boarding schools, US Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland announces the first findings in a 106-page report. A United States House committee hears testimony from Deborah Parker, a descendant of Tulalip residential school survivors, and Matthew War Bonnet, a South Dakota residential school survivor living in Snohomish.

Federal Indian boarding school sites identified in Washington.  (U.S. Department of Interior)

Federal Indian boarding school sites identified in Washington. (U.S. Department of Interior)

Sources: HistoryLink.com; the Hibulb Cultural Center; a timeline of the Tulalip tribes; research of historians Betty Lou Gaeng, Sister Dorothy Lentz and Carolyn Marr; diaries of Father Eugène Casimir Chirouse, Dr Charles Buchanan and Charles Larsen; and other primary documents.

Read the rest of this series, The Stolen Children of Tulalip.

Gallery


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Boarding school hearing sheds light on ‘dark times’ for Native Hawaiians https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/boarding-school-hearing-sheds-light-on-dark-times-for-native-hawaiians/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:34:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/boarding-school-hearing-sheds-light-on-dark-times-for-native-hawaiians/ HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — A congressional hearing on abuse in the federal Indian residential school system sparked moving testimony Wednesday on Capitol Hill ― a call for more to be done to uncover abuse against Indigenous children. The unprecedented hearing comes after a US Department of the Interior investigation listed hundreds of boarding schools across America […]]]>

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — A congressional hearing on abuse in the federal Indian residential school system sparked moving testimony Wednesday on Capitol Hill ― a call for more to be done to uncover abuse against Indigenous children.

The unprecedented hearing comes after a US Department of the Interior investigation listed hundreds of boarding schools across America where Native children, including Native Hawaiians, were abused and stripped of their culture.

Native Hawaiians are seeking to bring the dark chapter of history to light – as Congress and the federal government struggle to acknowledge the wrongs of the past.

“For more than a century and a half, the federal government … forcibly removed Indigenous children from their families and communities and many never returned home,” said the Secretary of the United States Department of Health. Interior, Deb Haaland.

A federal report showed that tens of thousands of Indigenous children were stripped of their language and forced to assimilate into white culture from 1819 to 1969 in the federal residential school system.

Haaland, the first Native American to serve as cabinet secretary, says her grandparents were fired.

“This intentional targeting and removal of Indigenous children to achieve the goal of forced Indigenous assimilation was both traumatic and violent,” Haaland said.

U.S. Senator Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, chairman of the Indian Affairs Committee, described conditions at residential schools: “Forced labor, whippings, solitary confinement, withholding food, making older children punish older young people with corporal punishment, unsanitary and overcrowded. living conditions.”

“The residential school was a dark time in our nation’s history and a painful example of how past federal policies have failed Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians,” Schatz said.

Norma Wong of Kalihi was the Native Hawaiian Policy Officer for Governor John Waihee and explained how ‘olelo Hawaii was banned.

“My grandmother was banned from the language when she was young and didn’t speak it again until two weeks before she passed away,” Wong said.

Kamehameha schools are among seven Hawaiian schools listed in the report. He said he was “struggling with his own colonial history” while transforming himself over time to “elevate communities through an education grounded in Hawaiian culture.”

List of boarding schools in Hawaii:
  • Hilo Boarding School
  • Industrial and Reform School
  • Industrial and Reform School for Girls
  • Kamehameha Schools
  • Lahainaluna Seminary
  • Mauna Loa Forest Camp School
  • Molokai Forest Camp School

The US Department of the Interior is planning a nationwide “Road to Healing” tour and says it is targeting policies that revitalize Indigenous health care, mental health, education, languages ​​and cultural practices.

Copyright 2022 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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Ukraine thanks Ben Stiller, Angelina Jolie and other stars for their visit ‘despite the danger’ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ukraine-thanks-ben-stiller-angelina-jolie-and-other-stars-for-their-visit-despite-the-danger/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:10:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ukraine-thanks-ben-stiller-angelina-jolie-and-other-stars-for-their-visit-despite-the-danger/ On Monday, Ben Stiller joined a growing list of celebrities who visited Ukraine to show their support at the war with russia. The country’s Defense Department thanked Stiller and other stars, such as Angelina Jolie, Sean Penn, Liev Schreiber, “who, despite the danger, visited us.” the ministry wrote in a tweet. Stiller, a goodwill ambassador […]]]>

On Monday, Ben Stiller joined a growing list of celebrities who visited Ukraine to show their support at the war with russia. The country’s Defense Department thanked Stiller and other stars, such as Angelina Jolie, Sean Penn, Liev Schreiber, “who, despite the danger, visited us.” the ministry wrote in a tweet.

Stiller, a goodwill ambassador for the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, visited the country on World Refugee Day. “I meet people who have been affected by war and hear how it has changed their lives,” he said in a video released by UNHCR. “War and violence devastate people all over the world.”

“No one chooses to flee their home,” he said. “Seeking security is a right and it must be respected for each person.”

During his visit, the actor met with Ukrainian President Volodmyr Zelenskyy. “You are my hero,” he told Zelenskeyy. “What you have done and the way you have rallied the country and for the world is truly inspiring.”

Stiller has supported the refugee agency since early 2016 and was named a goodwill ambassador in July 2018. He has traveled to meet refugees in Germany, Jordan, Guatemala and Lebanon, according to the UNHCR.

In the same way, Angelina Jolie also did extensive work with the agency and visited Ukraine earlier this year. She made a surprise visit to Lviv, and met children who were injured in a Russian missile attack on the Kramatorsk train stationaccording to Maksym Kozytskyy, governor of the Lviv regional administration.

The governor said Jolie was “very moved” by the children’s stories. Jolie also visited a boarding school and spoke to students, promising to return, Kozytskyy said.

As people began fleeing Ukraine in February after Russia launched its unprovoked attack, actor Sean Penn was one of the first to travel to the capital, Kyiv. He was there to record events unfolding in Ukraine, the president’s office said in a statement.

Penn wants to show the world what happens during the invasion, and the president’s office said the country is grateful to him for showing courage and honesty, according to the translation of the statement, which was shared on Facebook. .

The Oscar-winning actor visited the office of President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and took part in a press briefing with the head of state and the deputy prime minister. The office shared a photo of Penn during the briefing, seated in the front row, wearing sunglasses. He also visited Ukraine in November 2021 and spoke with the army in Priazov for his documentary.

Another actor, Liev Schreiber, has also done extensive work in support of Ukraine, including a visit, where he met Ukrainians in bomb shelters.

Schreiber co-founded BlueCheck Ukraine, an initiative to find, monitor and fund Ukrainian non-governmental organizations. He often uses his social media to share information about the organization and the ongoing war in Ukraine.

He also spoke at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in May, following Zelenskyy’s speech. Schreiber, whose grandfather was of Ukrainian and Polish descent, told Reuters: “It’s overwhelming to see how resilient the Ukrainian people are.”

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Similar fantasy shows to watch after season 3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/similar-fantasy-shows-to-watch-after-season-3/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 13:40:22 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/similar-fantasy-shows-to-watch-after-season-3/ The Locke Family and Their Magic Keys will soon return to Netflix. locke and key Season 3 kicks off in August, bringing another epic battle between the humans and the demon world. Unfortunately, the new season will mark the conclusion of the series, so fans will have to say goodbye to the beloved characters. But […]]]>

The Locke Family and Their Magic Keys will soon return to Netflix. locke and key Season 3 kicks off in August, bringing another epic battle between the humans and the demon world. Unfortunately, the new season will mark the conclusion of the series, so fans will have to say goodbye to the beloved characters. But there are plenty of other places to get a fantasy drama fix – here are some similar shows to check out after locke and key.

Emilia Jones as Kinsey Locke, Ian Lake as Bolton and Connor Jessup as Tyler Locke in ‘Locke & Key’ Season 3 | Amanda Matlovich/Netflix

“The Umbrella Academy”

Many locke and key fans fell in love with the series because of its source material: a collection of comic books of the same name by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez. by Netflix The Umbrella Academy has a similar origin story, as it is based on the comics by Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá. The show follows a family of superheroes, all adopted, who hope to uncover the truth behind their father’s death. Meanwhile, they must put an end to an apocalyptic threat.

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The Story Behind NC Symphony’s Juneteenth Performance https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-story-behind-nc-symphonys-juneteenth-performance/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-story-behind-nc-symphonys-juneteenth-performance/ Share this story How important is exposure to the arts at a young age? Anthony Kelley is Professor of Music at @DukeU and currently @ncsymphony Composer-in-Residence. Discover his journey here and discover his latest work, “Spirituals of Liberation”. This North Carolina composer started out on a toy piano. Discover how his journey led him to […]]]>

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  • How important is exposure to the arts at a young age? Anthony Kelley is Professor of Music at @DukeU and currently @ncsymphony Composer-in-Residence. Discover his journey here and discover his latest work, “Spirituals of Liberation”.

  • This North Carolina composer started out on a toy piano. Discover how his journey led him to become the composer-in-residence of the @ncsymphony.

One of Dr. Anthony Kelley’s older brothers received a toy organ for Christmas. Shelved for two years, it was obvious Kelley’s siblings weren’t interested in playing the instrument. He picked up the book that came with the toy and started trying to figure it out on his own.

He didn’t quite understand how to make music at the time, but his determination was something his parents noticed. Maybe it might be worth exploring, they thought.

Kelley grew up in Henderson, North Carolina with two elementary school teachers as parents. His first piano teacher was Mrs. White, who lived in the neighborhood and played at a local church.

His parents encouraged his talent, but were not yet going to buy a piano for their young son. Kelley needed a place to practice outside of her piano lessons.

In sixth grade, Kelley contacted the elementary school caretaker behind her house where her mother taught to see if they could work out a solution. While the school janitor completed his after-school cleaning routine, Kelley used that time to practice the piano.

This went on for a year and a half, until her parents saw that music was not going to be a passing extracurricular activity and bought a piano for the house.

Fifteen-year-old Anthony Kelley plays the piano. Courtesy of Anthony Kelley

These are the beginnings of a musical life for Anthony Kelley. In what he describes as “a full-loop moment in the most rewarding way imaginable,” Kelley is now the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra’s composer-in-residence. On June 18, in commemoration of Juneteenth, his new original composition titled “Spirituals of Liberation” will be performed at NC Symphony’s Summerfest: Juneteenth Freedom Celebration.

Influential Musical Moments

Growing up, Kelley’s musical curiosity was not limited to the piano. At Henderson Junior High School, he learned tuba and trombone.

His band director took the class to see the high school band perform an arrangement of one of the movements from Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.

“It changed everything for me, and I found myself locked into music from that point on.”

Dr. Anthony Kelley, Composer-in-Residence and Associate Professor of Music Practice at Duke University

Kelley had a good friend who played in the band with him in college. They constantly challenged each other, playing a game to see which of the two could find the most obscure classical music in the library. This friend’s aunt saw their interest and approached Kelley’s parents to offer to take them to Raleigh for an NC Symphony performance. The guest solo artist for this show was jazz pianist Billy Taylor.

It was Kelley’s first experience with an orchestra, and the fact that Taylor spoke a dialogue there with both black jazz language and classical language forever influenced Kelley.

“I never separate them. Everything I’ve ever written contains these dialogues. This moment contributes to my style,” Kelley said. He still has the ticket for this performance.

In grade 10, he left Henderson to attend Choate Rosemary Hall, a private boarding school. His music theory teacher, Ralph Valentine, redirected him to composition at school. This course helped him understand how to develop harmony and gave context to the history and culture of songwriting.

After boarding school, he returned to North Carolina to attend Duke University. It was in his second year when he toured Europe with the Symphony of the Winds that his conductor made sure they visited the monuments of great composers. He saw where Mozart lived and where other great composers wrote their first symphonies. These trips kept the idea of ​​writing music at the forefront of his mind.

Anthony Kelley in front of Motzart’s house while touring Europe with the Symphony of the Winds. Courtesy of Anthony Kelley

He became a composition student of Robert Ward for the remainder of his undergraduate degree. After pursuing his master’s degree, he heard the work of Olly Wilson, a black composer based at the University of California, Berkeley. Kelley was so overwhelmed by the “Sometimes” play that he wrote a letter to Wilson the following week saying, “whatever you do, that’s what I want to do more of.”

Courtesy of Anthony Kelley

Kelley received a full ride to the University of California, Berkeley to earn his doctorate and studied with Wilson. Kelley said Wilson is a specialist in understanding how West African music connects to African American music. All of these experiences and more have brought him back to Duke, where he has worked since 2000.

“The Spirituals of Liberation”

For Kelley, spirituals were created by the need to express oneself. They are originally a way for slaves to connect to the afterlife, whatever the afterlife meant to them. It was a way of expressing hopes, fears and aspirations. “I create new spirituals, based on what I know to be the characteristics of old spirituals,” Kelley said.

First movement of the Spirituals of Liberation. Courtesy of Anthony Kelley.

The composition is divided into three movements. It “covers the journey from the oppression of slavery to the ecstasy and triumph of liberation and emancipation,” Kelley says. He wanted it to encompass the total human experience of slaves, not just slavery.

The first movement is called “Work Song (for a Post-Terrestrial Railroad),” and Kelley describes it as a little tip of the hat to the work of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. In the piece, audiences will hear sounds that mimic that of building a railroad, intertwined with complex melodies that represent the psychological work of being enslaved.

“Elegy (for the New Blues People)” is the second movement, and for this piece Kelley drew inspiration from the book “Blues People” by Imamu Amiri Baraka, which takes into consideration the experiences of second-generation slaves and at -of the ; those who were born in America and do not consider Africa their home. These “blues people” are those who have begun to create music that is not purely of African origin, but a hybrid of their influences.

The third and final movement of Kelley’s composition is titled “Never Forget.” He describes it as the accomplishment of true liberation, and he refers to the other movements in the work.

After Summerfest on June 18, the NC Symphony will continue to perform the piece in a concert series traveling to Chapel Hill, New Bern and Tarboro. For more information on free concerts, click here. This article will be updated with Kelley’s article after Juneteenth.

Caroline Parker

Caroline Parker is a multimedia storyteller for EducationNC. She covers the stories of rural North Carolina, the arts, and STEM education.

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Tribute to Sr Pat Robb CJ, 1936-2022 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/tribute-to-sr-pat-robb-cj-1936-2022/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:05:26 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/tribute-to-sr-pat-robb-cj-1936-2022/ Sr Pat Robb during a climate lobby in 2015 The following is taken from the personal memoirs of Sr Pat by Sr Gemma Simmonds. Pat was born in 1936 in Penang to a Scottish father and an English mother who had both served in the First World War. His father died in Malaysia when Pat […]]]>

Sr Pat Robb during a climate lobby in 2015

The following is taken from the personal memoirs of Sr Pat by Sr Gemma Simmonds.

Pat was born in 1936 in Penang to a Scottish father and an English mother who had both served in the First World War. His father died in Malaysia when Pat was just two years old, leaving his mother to move to a family farm in Somerset, where little Pat was soon in his element, riding horses and tractors and learning to love all things green and growing.

Her mother was called up for nursing duty during World War II, so Pat was sent to boarding school when she was six. The end of the war brought a new move to Cambridge, where an angry, sulky and rebellious young teenager (Pat’s own description) was hired at Paston House (now St Mary’s School) by the headmistress of the time, Sr. Christopher Angell, who is still alive. and on a mission to Zimbabwe at the age of 106. Sr. Christopher saw Pat as a challenge, and she was not the only person to share this vision of Pat during her lifetime! Paston House was Pat’s eighth school, but she knew right away that a Mary Ward school was different from the “survival of the fittest” culture she had encountered elsewhere.

Giving up on her original ambition of becoming a stable girl with Royston’s racing trainer, she followed her mother and chose nursing at Middlesex Hospital in London. Pat loved nursing and the independent life of London with its smoky cafes, skiffle music and co-ed hockey played with young doctors. There was tension around his interest in Catholicism both with his devoted Anglican mother and with a young farmer boyfriend who asked him to choose between him or becoming a Catholic. But neither her mother nor her boyfriend persuaded her, and Pat was received into the Catholic Church, making her First Communion in the Cambridge Convent Chapel with Mrs Hawke, mother of Sr Anna and Nonie Hawke, who was teaching mathematics at St Mary’s, like her godmother.

Pat became a staff nurse, but other adventures called her, and she sold her Lambretta scooter and boarded a ship bound for Australia, where she found a job in the mountains of New South Wales, covering everything from children’s wards, A&E, maternity and the operating room, dealing with horrific accidents among men digging roads and dams on the mountainside. She went to South Africa in 1960, at a time of appalling violence and racial segregation, often finding herself sitting with black Africans in church, looked down upon by white people.

Deciding to train as a midwife in order to work in a bush mission hospital, she boarded a boat to return home, where she was harassed by two Irish nuns to visit their convent to see ” what it’s like to be a nun”. Pat shuddered at the thought and avoided them for the rest of the trip, but to forget them, and thinking that a teaching order was a greater sacrifice, she said she was entering the sisters of her old school. True to her education, she then felt that she had to keep her word. Mrs Robb was devastated when she broke the news, but the Cambridge community was so kind to her that later she was to say she hadn’t lost a daughter but had gained several. As anyone who knew her would understand, Pat found novitiate life very constraining, so she was thrilled when she was sent to St Mary’s School in Shaftesbury after her vows, heading out into the countryside and wildlife with eagerness. . As Sr Camille, she spent 18 years there as a school nurse, starting the Duke of Edinburgh’s reward scheme, running the Scottish reel club with the help of her prima ballerina, today hui abbess of a Benedictine monastery, and being remembered primarily by former students who have paid tribute to her on Facebook for riding their horses around the hockey pitch, roaring in a tractor and teaching them to play rugger touch, despite the disapproval of many parents.

But her missionary vocation never left her and she returned to London as a midwife, finally landing in Zimbabwe, in a hospital with more than 200 beds, serving a huge outlying rural area. Returning to her Christian name, Pat moved on to the municipal clinic in the desperate poverty of Amaveni township where her interests for justice and peace were awakened by the torture and bullying she witnessed by supporters of Robert Mugabe. A call came from Mozambique, in Chimoio, on the border with Zimbabwe. Built for 25,000 people, Chimoio now housed 250,000, mostly civil war refugees, squatting on the outskirts of town with no sewer or shelter. She focused on maternal and child health, but also dealt with the high number of maimed victims of violence and people dying of HIV/AIDS. In one of many confrontations with authority in her life, she was expelled from Mozambique after speaking out against corruption in the local charity and government sectors, but was invited to travel to Angola with the charity CONCERN.

She flew there to find that the CONCERN office had been bombed during the night and that all documents had been destroyed. Undeterred, she set up nutritional centers with Doctors Without Borders. 100 people a week were dying of starvation and related diseases there in terrible living conditions and she was very busy, with shelling all night and drunken and drugged soldiers guarding the many roadblocks as she and her companions crossed the minefields. When asked if she would do similar work in the camps surrounding Rwanda, she became the camp administrator in Tanzania in 1993, moving to Goma in Congo and Rwanda and then to Burundi at a camp they had to evacuate five times in the six months she was there. Years later, she and I went to see the movie Hotel Rwanda. She was very quiet on the way home, crying later as she recalled the horrors she had witnessed during the genocide.

Pat moved to another war zone in Sierra Leone, organizing the logistics of turning a disused university into housing for hundreds of people, aided by a Muslim cook called Alfred and a Christian guard called Mohammed. His career in the African war zones came to an abrupt end when a bout of cerebral malaria necessitated his repatriation to England. Here she found a volunteer role at the Cardinal Hume Homeless Centre, with one day a week at a legal aid firm involved in human rights for the Traveler community. This was the beginning of her life as a tireless campaigner for justice and peace which is recognized in Professor Anna Rowlands’ recent book on Catholic social teaching which bears a dedication to Pat. He says, “She represented the persistent widow, the virtuous and difficult woman who faithfully believes in a truth beyond mere power and bears witness to it until justice is served. She represents a generation of women, inscribed in the magisterial pages of tradition, but who have led and inspired social renewal.

Conventional community life was not for Pat after her long years under fire and in May 1999 she moved to a flat in Cambridge, working first at Whitemoor high security prison and then as a chaplain at the center of Oakington immigrant detention until its closure in 2010. In old age, she became involved in Justice and Peace work through CAFOD and other NGOs, campaigning on behalf of refugees, including many have become members of his extended family, while caring for his beloved lot.

At the end of his memoir, Pat writes, “God has been VERY good to me.” She, in turn, fought the good fight on behalf of so many who needed a valiant champion. We imagine her well received in Paradise, “Bravo, good and faithful servant – there are horses, motorcycles and gardens galore, just waiting for you to enjoy them…” May she finally rest in peace after his extraordinary life and rise in glory.

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10 Best LGTBQ+ Couples In Teen TV Shows https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/10-best-lgtbq-couples-in-teen-tv-shows/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/10-best-lgtbq-couples-in-teen-tv-shows/ Team Peyton or Team Brooke? Team Paxton or Team Ben? For decades, teen TV shows have been plagued with heterosexual love triangles and fans screaming impatiently from rooftops on the ships they support. While this is all fun, many LGBTQ+ fans often wonder when it would be their turn to not only have LGBTQ+ couples […]]]>

Team Peyton or Team Brooke? Team Paxton or Team Ben? For decades, teen TV shows have been plagued with heterosexual love triangles and fans screaming impatiently from rooftops on the ships they support. While this is all fun, many LGBTQ+ fans often wonder when it would be their turn to not only have LGBTQ+ couples to cheer for, but love triangles to choose sides for.

Luckily, the time has finally come, as the genre of teen television has begun to branch out more than ever. For the first time in decades, LGBTQ+ teens have love-positive relationships to admire without having to worry about their beloved ship ending or getting killed for shock value. The best part is that Couples doesn’t stop at gay or lesbian couples and instead encompasses the entire LGBTQ+ community.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Charlie & Nick – Favorite


Adapted from the popular webcomic turned graphic novel, Heart stroke became one of the biggest and best LGBTQ+ shows of all time. The teen series follows Charlie and Nick, two unlikely friends, whose friendship begins to merge into romantic territory as Nick begins to question his sexuality.

RELATED: 8 Ways Heartstopper Is The Best LGBTQ+ Show Right Now

Viewers flock earphone not just for its diversity, but because of the sweet and genuine nature of Nick and Charlie’s relationship. Charlie allows Nick to come to terms with his sexuality on his own, while Nick constantly reminds Charlie that they won’t have to keep their relationship hidden forever. Their constant communication and mutual support is one of the reasons they are such an iconic gay teenage couple.


Ola & Lily – Sex Education


sex education season 3 ola lily

Before Hearstopper, Sex Education was one of Netflix’s strongest LGBTQ+ teen series on the streaming service. The series put sex at the forefront of its cast’s minds and made a point of exploring LGBTQ+ couples in the mix, including the progression of Ola and Lily’s relationship.

At the start of the series, Lily focuses on losing her virginity to one of the boys she goes to school with. In season two, Lily befriends Ola and together the two go from friends to girlfriends. Girls explore their sexuality in a safe and nurturing environment since they’re just figuring things out and there’s no pressure to be perfect.


Victor & Benji – Love, Victor


Benji and Victor sitting together in love, Victor

Born from the success of the hit romantic comedy Love, Simon, Love, Victor takes place in the same universe but focuses on an entirely new group of students from Creekwood. At the center is Victor, a teenager who, in addition to moving to a new school, is trying to come to terms with his sexuality. Eventually Victor finds out he is gay and fully admits his feelings for Benji.

While Victor and Benji are undeniably cute together, they’re not without their issues. Both struggle with communication issues and jealousy, which are very real issues that every young lover faces. It’s their determination to work things out that makes them such a great couple.


Kat & Adena – The Daring Guy


The fat guy is arguably one of Freeform’s best and most underrated original shows of all time. The drama series centers on three best friends who all work for a popular women’s magazine. The series follows the professional and private life of the friend who led to the creation of one of the best couples in the series: Kat and Adena.

Like many LGBTQ+ teen show experiences, Kat doesn’t know she’s not straight until she meets and starts dating Adena. Although they have their fair share of problems, especially when Adena pulls away when Kat reveals she’s bisexual, the two manage to make their love work by always putting themselves first. They are truly selfless girlfriends who prefer to see themselves succeed professionally.


Alex and Charlie – 13 reasons why


Miles Heizer as Alex Standall and Tyler Barnhardt as Charlie St Prom Kings 13 Reasons Why

13 reasons why may have been one of Netflix’s most controversial teen shows of all time, but it gave viewers some pretty iconic pairings to ship, including the unexpected but beloved relationship between Alex and Charlie. Through their friendship, the two boys begin to explore their sexualities, which leads to Alex coming to terms with his attraction to Charlie and Charlie coming out as bisexual.

RELATED: 5 Better Relationships In 13 Reasons (& 5 That Make No Sense)

What makes Charlie and Alex so great is the fact that they started out as best friends. After going through deep trauma, Charlie is there to support Alex in any way he needs. Since the two boys figure things out, their relationship is slowly moving, which means neither of them wonders where they stand with the other.

Willow & Tara – Buffy the Vampire Slayer


tara willow buffy the vampire slayer

buffy the vampire slayer is one of the most beloved cult drama series of the late 90s and early 2000s. While it centered on Buffy, the young teenager tasked with protecting the world from vampires, demons and other supernatural forces, a supporting character stole the show: Willow Rosenberg.

Willow was such a breakout character because it was one of the first times a teenage character had spoken about her sexuality on television. When she started dating Tara in recent seasons, the two solidified themselves as one of the first and best LGBTQ+ teenage couples of all time, which is what makes their relationship so great.

Mason and Corey – Teen Wolf


Mason and Corey holding hands in Teen Wolf

No one expected MTV to dominate the teen TV genre, but then Teen Wolf created and proven everyone wrong. Loosley based on a 1985 film of the same name, the series revolved around Scott McCall, a young werewolf who must defend his town against supernatural creatures and threats.

Whereas Teen Wolf was known for its dramatic nature and deliverable pairings, the series also began to explore LGBTQ+ representation in later seasons. One of the best couples on the show was Mason and Corey. When Corey is turned into a werewolf, Mason helps him come to terms with his new reality, which also causes the boys to bond on more than just a platonic level.

Kurt & Blaine – Joy


For many teenagers growing up in the 2010s, Joy was the best TV show. Created by Ryan Murphy, the musical centered on the glee club at William McKinley High as they prepared for various choir competitions while dealing with their personal teenage lives.

RELATED: 15 Best Teen Shows With LGBTQ+ Representation

Like most high school students, the characters in Joy went through several relationships, but none were as solid as Kurt and Blaine. The two were each other’s first boyfriends and really stuck together through the tough time that is high school. It was their mutual support that led them to their forever bliss in later seasons.

Adam & Becky – Degrassi: the next generation


Adam & Becky - Degrassi: the next generation

Degrassi: the next generation was a cornerstone of teen television for decades because of how it evolved to be representative of the very teenagers it was trying to appeal to. Adam transferred to Degrassi in Season 10 following transphobic bullying at his old school. Unlike other shows that might present being transgender as an obstacle, Adam fully embraces his identity, much like most Degrassi students.

In Season 12, Adam began dating Becky, a religious student who worries about her parents’ reaction to her dating Adam. Although Becky makes a few mistakes with Adam, like trying to keep their relationship a secret, the two really do make a great couple because of their mutual support.


Wilhelm & Simon – Young Royals


Simon laying his head on Wilhelm's shoulder in Young Royals

Young Royals is a Swedish-produced teen drama series that airs on Netflix. It centers on teenage Prince Wilhelm of Sweden, who is sent to a prestigious boarding school after getting into trouble at home. There, Wilhelm bonds with Simon, a scholarship student who isn’t afraid to call the royal family. As the two begin to spend more time together, Wilhelm begins to have romantic feelings towards Simon.

Whereas Young Royals is a drama at its core, there are feel-good elements to the show, not least thanks to Wilhelm and Simon’s relationship. Simon is a great boyfriend because he introduces Wilhelm to new things and gets him to think about things in a different way. Likewise, Wilhelm helps Simon come out of his shell and defend himself.

NEXT: 9 Best LGBTQ+ Books That Deserve A Movie Or TV Series Adaptation

superman and laws jordan conner kent superboy

Superman and Lois secretly set up the real Superboy (not just Jordan)


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Fort Lewis College Appoints New Vice President of Diversity Affairs – The Durango Herald https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fort-lewis-college-appoints-new-vice-president-of-diversity-affairs-the-durango-herald/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 00:46:35 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fort-lewis-college-appoints-new-vice-president-of-diversity-affairs-the-durango-herald/ Heather Shotton is looking forward to being part of the school’s reconciliation process Fort Lewis College has hired Heather Shotton as its new vice president for diversity affairs. Shotton, who previously worked for the University of Oklahoma as chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and director of Indigenous Education Initiatives, replaces […]]]>

Heather Shotton is looking forward to being part of the school’s reconciliation process

Fort Lewis College has hired Heather Shotton as its new vice president for diversity affairs.

Shotton, who previously worked for the University of Oklahoma as chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and director of Indigenous Education Initiatives, replaces LeManuel “Lee” Bitsóí, who left FLC for a new role at Brandeis University.

Shotton said she was inspired by the mentors she had while earning her undergraduate degree.

Heather Shotton has been hired as Vice President of Diversity Affairs at Fort Lewis College. (Courtesy of Fort Lewis College)

“Honestly, I was inspired when I was in college myself as an Aboriginal student. I had two mentors, who were Indigenous professors, who really sparked my passion for education and research,” she said.

Shotton is a citizen of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes and is of Kiowa and Cheyenne descent.

She said she had both a curiosity and a desire to understand the experiences of Indigenous students at college. Shotton said that’s something she can bring to FLC, where nearly half of the student body is Native American.

She looks forward to participating in the work that FLC has done with reconciliation given the school’s history as a former Native American boarding school.

“It’s really essential work and work I look forward to taking on when I’m on campus.” she says. “More broadly, I’m really excited about Fort Lewis’s commitment to creating space for students from diverse backgrounds and thinking about the transformative capacity of higher education.”

Coming from another college, Shotton said his new position will require a lot of listening to better understand the specific issues facing FLC.

“I think Fort Lewis already has amazing staff, faculty and students, and I see my role as someone who can come in and work from a shared leadership position to really help think about the possibilities for Fort Lewis, from curriculum and broader inclusivity to reflection. about the specific communities they serve,” she said.

Shared leadership is a concept that Shotton believes in. It is an approach of increasing the number of people involved in a decision-making process regarding academics and the organization of a school.

Many factors made FLC an attractive choice for Shotton. Having worked her entire career in the field of Aboriginal education, she finds the history of the college interesting and knows that history.

She salutes FLC’s dedication to growing around diversity, equity and inclusion. Shotton is impressed with the intentional effort the school has made to partner with the Four Corners Tribal Nations.

“The stated and demonstrated commitment to DEI appeals to me,” she said. “There is tremendous leadership at Fort Lewis and more importantly there are amazing students and I am so excited to work with the students who make up this great institution.”

tbrown@durangoherald.com

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A new day dawns for Sydney Pagon STEM Academy https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/a-new-day-dawns-for-sydney-pagon-stem-academy/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 05:15:59 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/a-new-day-dawns-for-sydney-pagon-stem-academy/ Sydney Pagon staff member Robin Rhoden explains how a solar dehydrator works. (Pictures: Gregory Bennett) SANTA CRUZ, St Elizabeth – First established for agricultural training on over 200 acres of prime farmland in 1979, the Elim Distance School, aabout five miles northeast of here has always had a lot of advantages. Now, Sydney Pagon STEM […]]]>

Sydney Pagon staff member Robin Rhoden explains how a solar dehydrator works. (Pictures: Gregory Bennett)

SANTA CRUZ, St Elizabeth – First established for agricultural training on over 200 acres of prime farmland in 1979, the Elim Distance School, aabout five miles northeast of here has always had a lot of advantages.

Now, Sydney Pagon STEM Academy looks poised to become the secondary school of choice for children in rural Jamaica.

Observers and headteachers say the ‘game changer’ was a March gift from the J Wray & Nephew Foundation of a $47 million, 2,200 square foot multifunctional food processing plant .

Located on school property opposite the Sydney Pagon STEM Academy campus, the agricultural processing plant will serve not only the needs of the school, but also the wider farming community. This is part of the long-standing goal of advancing Jamaican agriculture beyond primary production to an efficient and comprehensive value-added mode.

When operational, the plant is expected to “dry, grind, package and store using state-of-the-art equipment.”

The state information agency, Jamaica Information Service (JIS) reported at the launch that “farmers will be able to take crops and turn them into chips and other products via baking and frying, as well as transitioning certain crops – such as breadfruit, sweet potato and more – in powders and flour”.

Sydney Pagon principal Milbert George Miller told the Jamaica Observer recently that “anything that can go into powder we can do”.

The agricultural processing plant will also be able to mass-produce coconut oil, JIS said.

For Miller, a critical outcome of the J Wray & Nephew Foundation donation will be student involvement in food processing, providing the opportunity to earn Level 3 certification at the NCTVET level and opening the door more widely to education. employment or continuing education.

“It will provide experiential learning and training…” Miller said optimistically.

“As we speak, a program [is being built] — well structured and organized — so that students, once they get here, take a course through to grades 12 and 13. By the time they leave here in 13th grade, [those with an interest in that course of study] should have at least a Level 3 or Associate in Agribusiness. We believe this will help them pursue a proper path in agribusiness on their own, and Jamaica will be better off,” Miller said optimistically.

He expects the plant to begin processing operations “soon” although exact timelines have yet to be established.

“There are a few minor jobs that contractors need to tie up,” Miller explained.

The J Wray & Nephew Foundation, the charitable arm of the J Wray & Nephew rum company, has committed to employing a manager for one year to start up the processing facility.

Miller said discussions had started with farmers in St Elizabeth and elsewhere, and a database was being established of those interested in processing their produce.

“We do our best to meet the needs of our farmers. So if you’re a cassava lover, for example, that you want to process for export, we’re here. If you want to label, we can do that too. Whichever modality you prefer, we are ready to support that modality,” he said.

“Our goal is to help our farmers make the transition; and once they can harvest crops and get them processed, get a good price, the economic situation in the community will improve,” Miller added.

Food processing is not new to Sydney Pagon. As part of its STEM education programs and agricultural training, products such as cassava, breadfruit and sweet potato have been dried and processed for years using mechanical dehydration.

With vastly increased capacity provided by the agricultural processing plant, Miller dreams of adding other products, including turmeric and ginger, “anything that can be ground into a powder.”

And while agriculture has always been a priority, large-scale innovation is practiced as an essential ingredient of integrated STEM education.

Vice-Principal Stevie Williams highlighted the school’s use of crushed Styrofoam to make a range of products, including flower pots. “It’s lighter but just as strong [as other materials],” he said.

For Miller, projects that involve recycling materials such as polystyrene foam, which “clog ravines and rivers etc. are essential to environmental education, facilitating “critical thinking” so that “our students can examine real-world problems and come up with solutions” in accordance with integrated STEM education.

When it was established 43 years ago, the school was seen as the cornerstone of the People’s National Party government’s campaign led by Michael Manley to get Jamaicans fed.

Subsequently named for long-serving St Elizabeth North Eastern MP Sydney Pagon, the agricultural training school became a boarding school for ninth-grade students.

There was a dropout from the boarding school in 2014 when seventh graders were admitted. The school was later rebranded and reorganized to provide project-based learning integrated with the STEM curriculum. Educators say the STEM approach to education not only helps students quickly acquire integrated knowledge in science, technology, engineering, math and other fields of study, but also builds self-confidence.

Given the continued and increased importance of agriculture and now agribusiness, Miller dreams of reviving boarding as a core business in the future.

He noted that while the boarding schools have become “somewhat dilapidated” over time, there has been a conscious effort at “maintenance”. He thinks that the rehabilitation will not cost too much.

Miller said the current dynamic atmosphere at his school owes much to the support of J Wray & Nephew. The rum company, a subsidiary of Italy’s Campari Group, has been trying to help people in northern St Elizabeth away from sugar addiction, after its Appleton sugar factory in Siloah closed in 2020.

Speaking at the official handover of the food processing plant in March, Jean-Philippe Beyer, chairman of the J Wray & Nephew Foundation, said his organization was deeply committed to communities in northern St Elizabeth.

Crushed polystyrene flower pots.

Assistant manager Stevie Williams says the innovation has included using crushed polystyrene to make a range of products, including lightweight flower pots.

Sydney Pagon STEM Academy’s Elim Agro-Processing plant is described as a game-changer.

Principal Milbert Miller dreams of a return to boarding as a main activity at Sydney Pagon STEM Academy.

The late parliamentarian Sydney Pagon in whose honor the STEM Academy is named.

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