Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 09:25:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Dr Umar Johnson: Philadelphia psychologist marries two women at the same time https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/dr-umar-johnson-philadelphia-psychologist-marries-two-women-at-the-same-time/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/dr-umar-johnson-philadelphia-psychologist-marries-two-women-at-the-same-time/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 09:25:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/dr-umar-johnson-philadelphia-psychologist-marries-two-women-at-the-same-time/ Famous psychologist Dr Umar Johnson recently found himself embroiled in controversy after apparently marrying two women at the same time. The Philadelphia-based activist, known for championing the black community, apparently married two women on Saturday, September 11, and the photo and clip of the ceremony went viral on the internet. On Sunday, September 12, Johnson’s […]]]>

Famous psychologist Dr Umar Johnson recently found himself embroiled in controversy after apparently marrying two women at the same time. The Philadelphia-based activist, known for championing the black community, apparently married two women on Saturday, September 11, and the photo and clip of the ceremony went viral on the internet.

On Sunday, September 12, Johnson’s official Instagram account posted a photo from the wedding ceremony that showed him donning a black suit with a white shirt and black bow tie. He was seen standing between his two alleged wives wearing matching white outfits. The photo caption did not provide any details about the wedding, however. Instead, he promoted his upcoming BootKamp training in Brooklyn. The caption read: “D) Dr. Umar returns to Brooklyn (NYC): Saturday October [email protected](must be seated by 10 a.m.), ‘5 Boroughs Black Parent Know Your School Rights BootKamp’ Superior Daycare Center, 1741 Broadway, 844-4DR-UMAR, DrUmarJohnson.com, https://www.eventbee.com/v/new- york-city-black-parent-know-your-school-rights-training-bootkamp / event? eid = 158095583. “

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About seven years ago, he even announced his intention to start a school named Fredrick Douglass Marcus Garvey Academy (FDMG) for young African American children. In an effort to open the boarding school, he also launched an initiative to raise $ 5 million to purchase St Paul’s College in Lawrenceville, Virginia. He later said that although the institution is nearing completion, he needed more money for essential repair work before it could open for regular classes. But many criticized him for it and accused him of fraud.

He also wrote a book called “Psycho-Academic Holocaust: The Special Educations & ADHD Wars Against Black Boys”.

Instagram page Gossip Of The City, with 648,000 followers, also shared clips of Johnson’s alleged marriage. One of the clips showed the two brides walking together before Johnson knelt down and put a ring on one of the bride’s fingers. Later, the school psychologist also did the same with the second woman. He also continued to kiss them both.

Johnson’s apparent double marriage drew a lot of criticism towards him, as one user commented, “I pray I am NEVER so desperate !!” The second slammed, writing: “Did you really marry 2 women. All of your teaching about black women is bullshit. You think black women like it. “These crazy people out there living for the moment come together before it’s too late God bless you) and where not in Africa and whatever weaves straight afro braids when you’re lying in that coffin, you are dead buddy but you will certainly be dead alive in hell, ”added the third.

One user questioned the marriage and said, “You don’t even worry about the good shit, Poly is not a new concept at all. It’s either for you or it’s not. THE REAL QUESTION IS… why him in a suit and they are wearing ouum cloth sheets? And I just feel like this marriage could have been better. Another wrote sarcastically: “So he got married in white men’s clothes ??” “Unless he is considering moving to AFRICA, one of them is not married,” reads one comment and another adds: “Did it take place in his unfinished school? ? Because the man who looks like a garage or a warehouse. One user joked, “Who throws a block party, school enrollment and double wedding in one event… WTF.”

However, some felt happy for Johnson. One of his supporters wrote: “Did this gentleman marry two women good, good? Go now.” Another said: “Congratulations Dr Umar hates to hate.” “Dr Umar, you should build a poly (straight) dating CONGRATULATIONS🎆✨🎊,” one person added.

If you have a scoop or an interesting story for us, please contact us at (323) 421-7514


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Saudi Arabia, 20 years after September 11: “A country in the making” | World https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/saudi-arabia-20-years-after-september-11-a-country-in-the-making-world/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/saudi-arabia-20-years-after-september-11-a-country-in-the-making-world/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:43:31 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/saudi-arabia-20-years-after-september-11-a-country-in-the-making-world/ DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) – Saudi Arabia today is very different from the Saudi Arabia of September 11, 2001. All but four 9/11 hijackers were Saudi citizens, and the Saudi kingdom was the birthplace of Osama bin Laden, the leader of al-Qaida and the mastermind of the attack he 20 years ago. Over the […]]]>

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) – Saudi Arabia today is very different from the Saudi Arabia of September 11, 2001.

All but four 9/11 hijackers were Saudi citizens, and the Saudi kingdom was the birthplace of Osama bin Laden, the leader of al-Qaida and the mastermind of the attack he 20 years ago. Over the next two decades, Saudi Arabia confronted al-Qaida on its own soil, overhauled its textbooks, worked to curb terrorist financing, and partnered with the United States to fight against terrorism.

It was only in the last five years, however, that the kingdom began to drift away from the religious ideology on which it was founded and which it has espoused inside and out. of its borders – Wahhabism, a strict interpretation of Islam that has helped spawn generations of Mujahedin. .

For countless people in the United States, Saudi Arabia will forever be associated with September 11, the collapse of the world trade towers and the deaths of nearly 3,000 people.

To date, the families of the victims have tried to hold the Saudi government in New York to account and have pushed President Joe Biden to declassify some documents related to the attacks, despite the Saudi government’s insistence that any allegation of complicity is “Categorically false”. The victims of a 2019 shooting at a Florida military base and their families are also suing Saudi Arabia for damages, saying the kingdom knew the Saudi air force officer had been radicalized and could have prevented the murders.

Saudi Arabia’s close partnership with the United States, including the presence of American troops in the kingdom after the first Gulf War, has made its leaders a target of extremist groups.

“It is important to realize that the terrorists who struck the United States on September 11 also repeatedly targeted the people, leaders, military personnel of Saudi Arabia and even our holiest religious sites in Mecca. and Medina, ”Fahad Nazer, spokesman for the Saudi embassy in Washington, told The Associated Press. He said Saudi-American counterterrorism work had saved thousands of lives.

Yet even as Saudi Arabia battled al-Qaida and subsequent IS group attacks, Al Saud leaders continued to give ultra-conservative clerics a monopoly on preaching and influence over society in return. for their unwavering support for the monarchy.

This decades-old pact collapsed in front of a room full of foreign investors in 2017 when Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman declared a return to “moderate Islam.” A year earlier, with the support of his father the king, the prince had cut off the powers of the country’s religious police – those who would chase young Saudi men and women out of parks to mingle, prey on playing cars. music and forcing shops to close during the five daily prayers.

“It’s a new country. It is a country in the making, ”said Raghida Dergham, founder of the Beirut Institute think tank and longtime columnist in Saudi newspapers. extremism … and it was not easy. “

The crown prince doubled in April this year in remarks on Saudi television. He said the Saudi identity is based on its Islamic and Arab heritage. His words seemed to equate the two and underscored the broader effort the state has undertaken to assert a Saudi national identity that is no longer tied to pan-Islamic causes and the religious ideologies of Sheikh Mohammed Ibn Abdul-Wahhab, whose teachings Ultraconservatives of Islam in the 18th century are widely referred to by its name.

“If Sheikh Mohammed Abdel-Wahhab came out of his grave and found us adhering to his text and closing our eyes to independent reasoning (ijtihad) or deifying it, he would be the first to oppose such a thing,” said Prince Mohammed.

Ali Shihabi, who has ties to the royal court, said the kingdom’s new tone signals “any cleric in office” that moderation is the only way forward.

Moderation, however, goes no further. As Saudi Arabia strives to shift perceptions and control the narrative of its past for new generations of Saudis two decades after September 11, it remains politically repressive.

Prince Mohammed’s rapid changes are part of a rushed effort that has coincided with him to build up power by sidelining rivals, like the country’s former anti-terrorism czar, and harshly cracking down on critics, including the murder of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi in Turkey by agents who worked for the prince.

Bruce Riedel, a Brookings Institution scholar who served with the CIA for 30 years, says US-Saudi relations have undergone fundamental changes over the years, but even in the best of circumstances, “it’s hard to sell Saudi Arabia as the country of America. best friend.”

While Saudi Arabia remains far from an open society, the cloud of social restrictions that has hung for generations in the kingdom is dissipating. Stunning concerts, cinemas and women at the wheel are no longer impossible or illegal.

“My personal point of view is that there is envy of the younger generation who have the opportunity to have these opportunities,” says Hisham Fageeh, a 33-year-old Saudi filmmaker, actor and writer working in Los Angeles who grew up in the shadow of September 11. .

But there are questions about where this new path will lead.

“There are several doors that people can go through,” says Fageeh. “The challenge will be how do we integrate all of our parts – our past, our present and our future? “

In the two decades since September 11, Saudi Arabia and the world have been reshaped by social media, the internet, and global connectivity. In Saudi Arabia, however, there is also a massive generational shift taking place. More than a third of Saudi Arabia’s population is under the age of 14 and was born years after September 11. More than 60% are under 35 years old.

All of them came of age following the September 11 attacks. They, like the 36-year-old crown prince, were not even born when the Shah of Iran was overthrown in 1979 and replaced by an anti-American, anti-Saudi Shia regime. That same year, Sunni Muslim extremists besieged Mecca, Islam’s holiest site.

Saudi leaders responded to the events of that year by empowering hardline supporters of the state and allowing Wahhabism to further shape life in Saudi Arabia. A power struggle between Saudi Arabia and Iran emerged, a struggle that continued to unfold in sectarian proxy wars across the Middle East.

As late as the still ongoing Syrian civil war, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf Arab states have either encouraged or turned a blind eye to the arming, funding, and recruiting of jihadist fighters who fought Shiite militias and Iranian-backed fighters.

But it is the joint effort of the United States, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan in the 1980s that can reverberate the strongest today. Years before being stripped of his Saudi nationality, Bin Laden and other Mujahedin were armed and funded by the CIA and the kingdom to defeat the Soviets in Afghanistan during the Cold War.

Years later, bin Laden would prepare the 9/11 attacks from al-Qaida base in Afghanistan, housed by the Taliban – the group which a few weeks ago returned to power.

When judging Saudi Arabia, Dergham says, consider the broader strategic interests that have long underpinned US-Saudi relations. “The Americans just think Saudi Arabia is the equivalent of September 11,” she said. “You know, wake up and smell the roses. It has been a partnership, an alliance with the United States for years and years.


Dubai-based Associated Press reporter Aya Batrawy covers Saudi Arabia. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/ayaelb



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Were Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton popular in high school? https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/were-meghan-markle-and-kate-middleton-popular-in-high-school/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/were-meghan-markle-and-kate-middleton-popular-in-high-school/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 19:31:14 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/were-meghan-markle-and-kate-middleton-popular-in-high-school/ Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge are two of the most popular women in the world. They have admirers everywhere they go, and many women admire them. But how were they in high school? Were Meghan and Kate popular as teenagers? Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle | Karwai Tang / WireImage What […]]]>

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge are two of the most popular women in the world. They have admirers everywhere they go, and many women admire them. But how were they in high school? Were Meghan and Kate popular as teenagers?

Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle | Karwai Tang / WireImage

What schools did Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton attend?

Meghan and Kate grew up on a little money and went to private schools.


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How the DOD shaped Americans’ view of the war in Afghanistan https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/how-the-dod-shaped-americans-view-of-the-war-in-afghanistan/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/how-the-dod-shaped-americans-view-of-the-war-in-afghanistan/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 17:09:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/how-the-dod-shaped-americans-view-of-the-war-in-afghanistan/ The Defense Ministry wanted you to see the footage of the last flag-draped coffins leaving Kabul last week – and then you don’t. On August 27, the military released eight images of the grim procession in honor of the 13 servicemen killed in a suicide bombing near the gate of the Abbey of Hamid Karzai […]]]>

The Defense Ministry wanted you to see the footage of the last flag-draped coffins leaving Kabul last week – and then you don’t.

On August 27, the military released eight images of the grim procession in honor of the 13 servicemen killed in a suicide bombing near the gate of the Abbey of Hamid Karzai International Airport the day before.

The ramp ceremony was the last chance for those on the ground to honor the dead as they left the war zone.

The photos show young Marines wearing helmets and bulletproof vests carrying the silver transfer cases containing their lost friends. Red, white and blue stand out against the sea of ​​camouflaged beige uniforms. The porters look tired, dismal, resolute. The soldiers line the road and pay homage.

On the C-17, the Marines kneel and bow their heads in front of the dead. The 13 transfer boxes line the floor of the aircraft.

One photo shows two Marines with their arms around each other. They are looking away from the camera. The hand of a Marine rests on his friend’s helmet.

These eight images sum up the war. Young volunteers thrown into a dead end situation. They are patriots who carry an unimaginable weight in perilous conditions. They joined a long list of people trapped by an escaped foreign policy and an apathetic nation. Despite the rhetoric and chaos, they fought side by side and took care of each other.

Unfortunately, the Department of Defense’s handling of the footage echoes another hallmark of the two-decade-long war – an insidious, pervasive and bureaucratic retention of information the public has seen from the war zone.

In this image provided by the US Marine Corps, the US servicemen assigned to the Joint Task Force-Crisis Response are carrying on Friday, August 27, 2021, servicemen killed in action during operations at the Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul , Afghanistan, while the transfer cases carrying the remains are placed on a US Air Force aircraft for return to the United States. (1st Lt. Mark Andries / US Marine Corps via AP)

1st Lieutenant Mark Andries, HOGP / Associated Press

War efforts, like any institution, have an innate desire to survive. It is difficult to sustain support when the public sees and understands the true costs. Thus, we see a variety of policies and approaches to shield us from the realities on the ground. More often than not, the government has wrapped these measures in sound reasoning, such as respect for the families of the missing and “operational security”.

The efforts also resulted in a vast overclassification of information, so the audience often got some of the basic facts, but details providing nuance and context were not available.

The end result is little sleight of hand like what happened to the eight photos of Kabul. You see, after posting the photos, the DOD removed them from the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, or DVIDS, the official repository of military images.

Lisa Lawrence, spokesperson for DOD, acknowledged the deletion of the photos and said they “were posted in error”.

This decision follows an old script that often veils the truth and departs from the military’s declared public affairs doctrine of “maximum disclosure, minimum time.”

The DOD banned media coverage of the transfer ceremonies from 1991 to 2009. The change allowed families to determine if the media could cover the arrival of the dead at Dover AFB in Delaware. He banned media coverage of the ceremonies at any location en route to Dover.

Local commanders also often place additional restrictions on military photographers, for example.

More than half a dozen times, on the Bagram flight line, I greeted the flag-covered transfer crates of the dead as their friends transported them on C-17s. At each ceremony, hundreds of people, including senior generals and State Department officials, rose to honor the dead under the Afghan sun. A group played hymns. The chaplains brought comfort. After the jet ramp closed, we all left in silence. And the families of the missing would never have been able to see any because photography was prohibited.

In this image provided by the US Marine Corps, the US servicemen assigned to the Joint Task Force-Crisis Response are carrying on Friday, August 27, 2021, servicemen killed in action during operations at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul , Afghanistan, as the transfer cases are placed on a US Air Force C17A Globemaster III for the return flight to the United States.  (1st Lt. Mark Andries / US Marine Corps via AP)

In this image provided by the US Marine Corps, the American soldiers assigned to the Joint Task Force-Crisis Response, are the carriers, on Friday August 27, 2021, of the soldiers killed in action during operations at the Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, as the transfer cases are placed on a US Air Force C17A Globemaster III for the return flight to the United States. (1st Lt. Mark Andries / US Marine Corps via AP)

1st Lieutenant Mark Andries, HOGP / Associated Press

Many of us thought that if we were killed we would want our families to see how our brothers and sisters honored us when we left Afghanistan.

Other coalition countries, including Australia, Canada and New Zealand, had no such restrictions.

It is rare to see such images here. We should be grateful to 1st Marine Lt. Mark Andries, the photographer who captured these photos, and whoever posted them to the world.

Maybe the DOD and the politicians didn’t want these striking photos to end the war. Maybe they preferred the footage of troops helping the Afghans, or that green night-vision snapshot of the last soldier, a general, boarding the last plane.

It’s hard to understand what’s really going on in a war-torn country halfway around the world. The problem is compounded when information is carefully formatted. These photos leave the question: would we have stayed in Afghanistan as long as we did if we had better understood what was going on?

Either way, footage from the Kabul ramp ceremony reminds us of the immeasurable costs of war and serves as a warning against the government veiling the truth.

brandon.lingle@express-news.net


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Apparent fake school Bishop Sycamore got calendar from IMG Academy https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/apparent-fake-school-bishop-sycamore-got-calendar-from-img-academy/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/apparent-fake-school-bishop-sycamore-got-calendar-from-img-academy/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 21:34:23 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/apparent-fake-school-bishop-sycamore-got-calendar-from-img-academy/ BRADENTON, FL – IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. Is “the world’s most prestigious athletic, performance and educational institution,” according to its website. “With our world-renowned boarding school and reputable athletic camps, IMG continues to set the standard for academic, athletic and total personal development among young student-athletes.” The school has a number of former and […]]]>

BRADENTON, FL – IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. Is “the world’s most prestigious athletic, performance and educational institution,” according to its website.

“With our world-renowned boarding school and reputable athletic camps, IMG continues to set the standard for academic, athletic and total personal development among young student-athletes.”

The school has a number of former and current NFL players as alumni, including a record seven former players who were selected in the NFL Draft earlier this year.

So it was no surprise that ESPN wanted to showcase the power of football and its multiple confirmed NCAA Division I rookies, in one game this season.

But the school selected to face IMG on national television on Sunday afternoon is anything but a football powerhouse. And apparently it can be anything but a real high school.

Bishop Sycamore took the field against IMG in Canton, Ohio on Sunday before being heavily beaten, 58-0. Reports quickly surfaced that not only did Bishop Sycamore seemingly lied about how many Division I recruits they had, they were not even listed as an educational institution by the Ministry of the Ohio Education. There is no charter school registered in Ohio under the name of Bishop Sycamore.

The school address listed on the MaxPreps website that tracks high school sports teams across the country matches a building on the Franklin University campus in Columbus, Ohio, with a separate address previously posted on the site. Bishop Sycamore’s web as a PO Box.

A day earlier, the Bishop Sycamore’s website looked a lot more like a football blog than something related to an educational institution. The tab under ‘schedule’ was left blank, although other press reports confirmed that the football team had played a few games in recent years.

Further investigations by various news outlets later revealed that head coach Bishop Sycamore had an active arrest warrant on the national broadcast, the team had played a game in Pennsylvania just two days before the IMG contests, and many players are junior dropouts. who are past high school age.

So how did an established football powerhouse like IMG Academy end up with such an unusual entity on its schedule that features a number of matches against some of the top football schools in the country?

IMG Academy did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Patch on Tuesday. It didn’t address their process of checking schedules, or whether anyone affiliated with the Bradenton-based boarding school had ever heard of their opponent from Ohio.

Despite national attention surrounding a win over a less-than-organized team, IMG had not, as of 5 p.m. Monday, deleted a tweet from Sunday celebrating the shutout victory.

Despite little evidence of such a school’s existence, Bishop Sycamore founder Andre Peterson has denied that his entity finding its way on ESPN was a scam.

“There is nothing that I got out of that that would be a scam because I don’t earn anything financially from what we do,” Peterson told USA Today, insisting that a number of students depended on the services of Bishop Sycamore.

“We have to make sure that this website includes the academic part as well. There are things you learn,” he said. “We need to make this a real school website.”

Bishop Sycamore was founded in 2019, said Peterson. Its actual location is private to protect students who were harassed at their old location, the founder also told USA Today. He said the school was renting space in a building in the Easton neighborhood of Columbus.

Last year, a “Bishop Sycamore” was listed by the Education Department as an unlicensed, non-tax-funded school, the Columbus Dispatch reported. It is part of a category of schools which “because of truly entrenched religious beliefs, choose not to be approved by the State Board of Education”.

ESPN has learned that Bishop Sycamore is an online charter school, according to multiple reports.

While the self-proclaimed “world leader in sport” was the most ridiculed by such an incident (he apologized and took some responsibility), less has been said about how IMG got involved in an incident. also puzzling saga.

“You should be embarrassed to schedule this game,” said a comment on Twitter.

IMG’s national schedule includes games against most of the state’s teams. He’ll be in Ohio again this weekend to take on Cincinnati’s La Salle High School, a well-known and recognized school.

But Bishop Sycamore’s game was the only one to air on ESPN, as his infamy could take IMG some time to live.



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Oakland officials and community members respond to possible end of federal police oversight https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/oakland-officials-and-community-members-respond-to-possible-end-of-federal-police-oversight/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/oakland-officials-and-community-members-respond-to-possible-end-of-federal-police-oversight/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 22:33:12 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/oakland-officials-and-community-members-respond-to-possible-end-of-federal-police-oversight/ Civil rights attorneys John Burris and Jim Chanin reported earlier this week that they were preparing to begin talks with City of Oakland officials to end the Police Department’s federal courts monitoring program. Oakland, which has been in place for 18 years and was the result of the “Riders” case in which a squad of […]]]>


Civil rights attorneys John Burris and Jim Chanin reported earlier this week that they were preparing to begin talks with City of Oakland officials to end the Police Department’s federal courts monitoring program. Oakland, which has been in place for 18 years and was the result of the “Riders” case in which a squad of West Oakland cops brutalized and planted drugs on dozens of people.

Burris and Chanin, who represent the victims of the Riders, argue that the Oakland Police Department is a much better police department than it was 20 years ago. Although the department is still not complying with five of the 52 reform tasks related to the negotiated settlement agreement, lawyers wrote that “now is the time to cross the finish line and put the OPD in. full and final compliance ”.

A hearing is scheduled for September 1 before U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick, where first steps towards a possible resolution of the case will be discussed. Prior to that, The Oaklandside gathered feedback from people who have closely followed the monitoring process or worked on reforms over the years.

Oakland Police Chief LeRonne Armstrong

Appointed chief six months ago, Armstrong said this week he was “cautiously optimistic” and that while great, the work of the department was recognized by plaintiffs’ attorneys, “we have not crossed the line. finishing line”.

“We are doing the things that have been asked of us by the federal comptroller as well as by our police commission. We recognize that oversight is important and we also recognize that it is a different department. I’m doing everything I can to make sure we get a cultural change that the court asked for, and [which] I believe this is important for law enforcement not only in Oakland, but across the country. We can be a model of what police service reform looks like and come up with progressive policing policies and practices, and that’s evidenced in some of the documents you’ve seen.

Armstrong added that he believes the city is able to keep the OPD at higher standards once the court-appointed monitoring team leaves. “I believe [the civilian police commission] is strong enough to hold us accountable. I think they have tremendous power and authority to bring in the ministry and the leader in case of a setback. They have shown their willingness to use that power and authority, and from that point of view, we are ready.

Rashidah Grinage, Coalition for Police Responsibility

Grinage, who has been involved in police reform efforts since the mid-1990s, said she believed the department had made enough progress that the surveillance program could come to an end, but only after a “period of probation where plaintiffs’ attorneys continue to observe and ensure continued progress and compliance.

“What must be recognized is that if it weren’t for the Coalition for Police Accountability, we wouldn’t have a viable ‘successor’ agency: the Police Commission. We realized that Oakland would need a permanent local institution to ensure that the OPD does not back down after the end of the NSA. This precipitated the work that led to the LL measure in 2016. If we had not done this work, Oakland would not be able to guarantee that the 20-year investment in police reform would be sustainable and that we would have a way to hold the OPD accountable for fair policing.

Oakland Police Commission President Regina Jackson

“The latest file indicates that Chief Armstrong has shown strong leadership, which I absolutely know,” said Jackson, who was appointed to the Police Commission in 2017 and is also chairman and CEO of the East Oakland Youth Development Center.

“The department needs to support reform and cultural change, which is essential to get out of the NSA. What I love about John and Jim, their underlying lawsuit is what led to the NSA. They clearly agreed that the strong leadership emanating from the OPD is a sign of good health. I agree that we need a year of sustainability. I hope this will be another opportunity for the OPD to demonstrate that it can self-govern and hold itself accountable.

“The embarkation of the Inspector General [a new position approved by voters] will be critical. We are considering, later, perhaps to bring [OPD’s Internal Affairs Division, which investigates police misconduct] at the Community Policing Review Agency. There are a lot of changes that speak of a new evolution of OPD, with a lot of community engagement for the benefit of our larger community. I like where we are. We still have a lot of work to do.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf

“I am deeply grateful to Jim Chanin and John Burris for their tireless advocacy to improve not only the Oakland Police Service, but policing across the country. It was heartwarming to read John Burris’ statement that Oakland is now a national model. It has happened so far, but a national model is not good enough. We know policing is a deeply divisive and polarizing issue right now, as it should be. Oakland is therefore dedicated not only to being the best, but to being what this community wants. This is a complicated question. There are a lot of desires. There are many versions of security. But I really want to commend Chief Armstrong for hearing and supporting all of these visions of what safety means to the people of Oakland.

“Surveillance should never be removed from our community and I know that community will never stop holding this city and this department accountable for decent behavior. The establishment of our police commission is a very important piece of this puzzle of responsibility and sustainability. I know that the fabulous leadership of our police commission, in particular its chairman Regina Jackson, is in part what also gives the plaintiff’s lawyers confidence in the sustainability of these reforms. I am very grateful to all those partners who pushed, who persisted, who continue to demand security and justice.

Lawyer Dan Siegel

“I was surprised to see that lawyers for the plaintiffs are pushing for the conclusion of the settlement agreement,” said Siegel, a civil rights lawyer who has sued OPD over the years for civil rights violations and is currently representing civilians. people who have been injured in the past year. George Floyd protests when the OPD and other police departments used tear gas and less lethal weapons to disperse the crowds.

“I don’t really understand why they are doing this. It seems to me that this is obviously the city’s position, but I hope that in the end the court will look at what the monitors have to say. Everyone seems to have agreed historically that the controllers are responsible and it seems odd that the plaintiffs’ lawyers are uniting with the city on this issue. I don’t think the issues have been resolved.

“I agree that Chef Armstrong ultimately seems like a good choice. But in reality, he’s only been there six months. The agreement and the monitoring approach required not only that the city implement changes and demonstrate over time that they have become permanent. I don’t think they’re there, just as I don’t think Armstrong’s leadership is fully established.

The Oaklandside also contacted attorneys representing the Oakland Police Officers Association and the president of the police union, but did not hear from them until the publication.Oa


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Ute Mountain Ute tribe opens charter school for classes – The Journal https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ute-mountain-ute-tribe-opens-charter-school-for-classes-the-journal/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ute-mountain-ute-tribe-opens-charter-school-for-classes-the-journal/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 23:56:57 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ute-mountain-ute-tribe-opens-charter-school-for-classes-the-journal/ Ute Mountain Ute tribe elder Alfred Wall, center, speaks to children at Kwiyagat Community Academy, ahead of his blessing Monday on the first day of school in Towaoc. He was joined by tribal council members Lyndreth Wall and Archie House Jr., and school principal Danny Porter, right. Jerry mcbride Kwiyagat Community Academy is officially shaping […]]]>

Ute Mountain Ute tribe elder Alfred Wall, center, speaks to children at Kwiyagat Community Academy, ahead of his blessing Monday on the first day of school in Towaoc. He was joined by tribal council members Lyndreth Wall and Archie House Jr., and school principal Danny Porter, right.

Jerry mcbride

Kwiyagat Community Academy is officially shaping the future of Ute Mountain Utes youth

Kwiyagat Community Academy, the new Ute Mountain Ute charter school, opened Monday to 23 kindergarten and first graders.

Long in preparation, the school’s inaugural day was a pivotal moment for Ute Mountain Utes’ education. Kwiyagat aims to grow year by year, with school officials hoping to provide additional education from grades two to four next year.

Although the new school building is not completely finished, it should be finished by the end of September. Until then, the children are learning in a temporary modular building.

The journey to day one was not easy, with several discussions leading up to the eventual birth of the school. In a virtual meeting on September 3, a student at Fort Lewis College said his educational opportunities had come “at the expense of my culture.”

Kwiyagat will provide a sanctuary for emerging minds to embrace their culture alongside STEM and other study programs.

Redsky Lang, 5, holds up her drawing she made on her first day of school at Kwiyagat Community Academy on Monday in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride / Durango Herald

Jerry mcbride

The school’s charter application was approved by the Colorado Charter School Institute on October 27, making it the first public institution to be approved on a reserve in the state. The institute approved the school contact on January 19 and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Council approved the contract on January 27.

School principal Dan Porter expects more students to enroll during the school year.

“People are going to start coming here because it’s project-based,” he said.

An educator in the Montezuma-Cortez RE-1 school district for 25 years, Porter said he believed there was an increasing emphasis on standardized testing within the public school system and subject enrichment such as music had become a priority.

Students line up for recess on Monday for the first day of school at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride / Durango Herald

Jerry mcbride

Kwiyagat aims to provide children with a full education, he said.

“Once you have a whole child, the test results will come,” he said.

Tribal elder Alfred Wall led a school blessing just after 10 a.m.

“Everything we do, we always start with a prayer,” he said.

Archie House Jr., Ute Mountain Ute board member, speaks to children at Kwiyagat Community Academy on Monday during the first day of school in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride / Durango Herald

Jerry mcbride

Council members present for the monumental day adorned it with a printed cover – a custom in keeping with Native American tradition to bestow a token to someone when showing appreciation.

The opening of the school aroused feelings of nostalgia in Wall. He remembered a time when there was a boarding school on the reserve. It had four classrooms and went up to fifth or sixth grade, he said.

It closed in 1958.

“We were all sent to Cortez or to boarding school,” he said. “Now we are back on the reserve. “

The new charter school is different, however.

Board member Lyndreth Wall said attendees were not allowed to speak their native language at Ute Mountain boarding school.

Kwiyagat, on the other hand, embraces the Ute language and culture, opening his arms to not only reserve students, but anyone interested.

The elders will visit the school periodically to teach the children the utes language and stories.

“I’m a big fan of infrastructure,” said Lyndreth Wall. “The infrastructure of our reserve is education.

Council Secretary Archie House Jr. said the new school will also help students close any educational and social gaps they have experienced in the wake of the pandemic by switching to online learning.

Michael Beard, 5, shows his enthusiasm on the first day of school at Kwiyagat Community Academy on Monday in Towaoc. Jerry McBride / Durango Herald

Jerry mcbride

Eddie Loughran grew up in the Navajo Nation near Moenkopi, Arizona.

Until this school year, he was a teacher in Denver.

But when he heard about Kwiyagat, he jumped at the chance to teach students in a way that was close to his heart.

“This is my chance to give back to the people who have given me so much,” he said.

The kids were restless – and that’s understandable. They participated in a variety of activities on day one, including coloring, learning songs, and a friendly game of tag as they explored their new classroom and got to know their peers.

“There is so much stimulation,” Loughran said. “They’re doing fine with this.”

As of the 2016-17 school year, there were 31 charter schools out of 22 bookings in 11 states. 12 more were enumerated that year on other lands of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The school has received a few grants that have helped its development, including a $ 2.7 million grant from the Response Innovation and Student Equity Fund, as well as a $ 210,500 grant from the Colorado Charter School Program.

For more information about the school, visit https://utekca.org/.

Teacher Jennifer Flaherty at Kwiyagat Community Academy is forcing students to line up to go inside after recess on Monday for the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride / Durango Herald

Jerry mcbride

Students at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc play hide and seek during recess Monday on the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride / Durango Herald

Jerry mcbride


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Ajman Bank partners with Kamel Pay to provide innovative payment solutions to businesses and individuals https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ajman-bank-partners-with-kamel-pay-to-provide-innovative-payment-solutions-to-businesses-and-individuals/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ajman-bank-partners-with-kamel-pay-to-provide-innovative-payment-solutions-to-businesses-and-individuals/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 08:00:34 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ajman-bank-partners-with-kamel-pay-to-provide-innovative-payment-solutions-to-businesses-and-individuals/ Ajman Bank, one of the leading Sharia-compliant banks in the UAE, has signed a partnership agreement with Kamel Pay, a fintech company, to create and implement a highly innovative payment value proposition for businesses and individuals in the United Arab Emirates. This partnership will form the basis for the growth of digital financial solutions in […]]]>

Ajman Bank, one of the leading Sharia-compliant banks in the UAE, has signed a partnership agreement with Kamel Pay, a fintech company, to create and implement a highly innovative payment value proposition for businesses and individuals in the United Arab Emirates. This partnership will form the basis for the growth of digital financial solutions in the United Arab Emirates.

Inspired by the UAE’s national payment system strategy to evolve towards a cashless society, Kamel Pay was envisioned in 2019 as a Fintech company with the strategic aim of giving businesses and individuals digital access to a full range of financial services in the United Arab Emirates. Kamel Pay aims to expand beyond the UAE and become the leading Fintech company in the MENA region.

“Having Ajman Bank as a trusted banking partner will provide Kamel Pay with a solid foundation to deliver innovative financial products and a seamless customer experience for businesses and individuals through a state-of-the-art payment platform and superior service delivery. . This collaboration between a bank and an agile Fintech offering the latest digital technologies will have a substantial impact on the adoption of secure and cashless payments across the UAE; especially in the under-banked population which had been largely neglected until now.

Mr. Mohamed Amiri, CEO of Ajman Bank, said: “We are delighted to partner with Kamel Pay as part of our continued commitment to strengthen the payment infrastructure with the most advanced, secure and cashless payment solutions. . Our goal is to develop a robust electronic payment ecosystem based on data and information to increase the safety and security of electronic payments. It complements our strategy and vision to meet the needs of our customers with the most innovative products and services. “

Kamel Pay strives to stay at the forefront of solving the UAE’s ever-emerging financial needs and future markets by delivering the benefits of secure, instant and cashless payments through product innovation and digital technology. peak.

Unlike many other fintech companies, the founding team of Kamel Pay comprises a group of seasoned professionals with over 100 years of collective experience in commercial banking and technology leadership with a proven track record in developing and executing solutions. innovative customer-centric digital technologies delivering value-added customer benefits. in several banking and financial services organizations in the region.

-Ends-

About Banque Ajman

Ajman Bank is an Islamic bank with an ambitious vision based on values ​​of integrity, trust and transparency that seeks to provide a wide range of high quality and Shariah compliant banking services to individual, corporate and corporate clients. government institutions of the United Arab Emirates. It is also keen to be updated with the latest technology that will provide customers with a distinctive experimental bank with the revival of human touch that is lost in the modern era of banking applications.

Ajman Bank is headquartered in Ajman and enjoys strong support from Ajman’s government and is a key pillar of the emirate’s economic development strategy. The bank continues its unremitting efforts to establish a leading position in the banking sector as a sustainable Islamic banking institution, emphasizing the need to achieve optimal balance in the community and caring staff, in order to delivering real value to shareholders and customers. look alike.

For more information visit http://www.ajmanbank.ae

ABOUT KAMEL PAY

Vision

Inspired by the UAE’s national payment system strategy to evolve towards a cashless society, Kamel Pay was conceived in 2019 as a Fintech company with the strategic objective of giving businesses and individuals digital access to a range of financial services.

Kamel Pay strives to stay at the forefront of addressing the ever-growing financial needs of communities in the UAE and the wider MENA region; by delivering the benefits of secure, convenient and cashless payments through product innovation and cutting-edge digital technology.

Kamel Pay’s founding team has over 100 years of banking and technology leadership experience with proven track record in launching customer-centric digital solutions, coupled with delivering value-added customer benefits across multiple banking organizations. across jurisdictions.

The solution

Kamel Pay facilitates payments for businesses and individuals through a secure and digital experience in collaboration with Ajman Bank.

The solution is available to all businesses and individuals wishing to benefit from a simplified integration process and end-to-end service delivery via a secure and user-friendly digital application. Kamel Pay’s feature-rich customer portal is a handy companion for managing day-to-day tasks and streamlining regular payments.

Kamel Pay provides EMV-compliant Prepaid Mastercard and user-friendly digital app to all cardholders with real-time digital account information and the ability to access funds at over 40 million touchpoints worldwide . The innovative digital Kamel Pay app provides a platform for running end-to-end financial services such as instant remittances, bill payments, online shopping, and more.

The solution will be launched in the UAE market shortly with particular preference for existing Ajman Bank customers and is expected to be rolled out to other GCC markets during the next phase of Kamel Pay’s expansion.

For more information, visit www.kamelpay.com

© Press release 2021


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Glenalmond College preparing to host its first farmers’ market https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/glenalmond-college-preparing-to-host-its-first-farmers-market/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/glenalmond-college-preparing-to-host-its-first-farmers-market/#respond Tue, 17 Aug 2021 09:16:38 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/glenalmond-college-preparing-to-host-its-first-farmers-market/ A Perth day and boarding school is preparing to host its inaugural farmers’ market this weekend. Glenalmond College will welcome around 40 stallholders to the 21–22 August event, where tables are set to be filled with artisan Scottish food, drink and crafts. “We are delighted with the level of interest in the event and, with […]]]>

A Perth day and boarding school is preparing to host its inaugural farmers’ market this weekend.

Glenalmond College will welcome around 40 stallholders to the 21–22 August event, where tables are set to be filled with artisan Scottish food, drink and crafts.

“We are delighted with the level of interest in the event and, with the weather forecast looking ideal, we are very much looking forward to welcoming stallholders and visitors this weekend to share our wonderful grounds,” said school head, Dr Michael Alderson.

Glenalmond College says that the event, run in association with Perth Farmers’ Market, is thought to be the first time a school has held such a gathering on this scale.

It also notes the institution’s strong ties to the land, with many agricultural families behind its founding almost 175 years ago. Moreover, the school’s first warden, Charles Wordsworth, was a nephew of the pastoral poet, William Wordsworth, who recorded his love of Glenalmond in ‘Glen-Almain, the Narrow Glen’: ‘There cannot be a more entire tranquility.’

Since then, many of the school’s former pupils have gone on to forge careers in farming and food-related businesses, including soft fruit, ice cream, whiskey and gin.

Glenalmond Farmers’ Market will run from 10 am-4pm on both days, with wares including baked goods from Casella and Polegato bakery, fish from Alex Sprink & Sons, jelly and sauces from Allan’s Chilli Products, wild game burgers from Screaming Peacock, gin from The Perth Distillery Company and jewelery from MG Gems.

“Glenalmond College is just beautiful, and the school is providing an excellent venue, which is one many people may not have visited before,” said Adeline Watson, manager of Perth Farmers’ Market.

“I’m delighted that we are welcoming several new stallholders to the event as well as our wonderful regular stallholders.”


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ASU professor explores questions of the sacred and the discarded https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/asu-professor-explores-questions-of-the-sacred-and-the-discarded/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/asu-professor-explores-questions-of-the-sacred-and-the-discarded/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 22:53:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/asu-professor-explores-questions-of-the-sacred-and-the-discarded/ Meders responded to ASU News’ questions about its exhibit and teaching on the West Campus: Question: What questions do you want viewers to ask themselves with this piece? Reply: There are many questions asked in this work. Work tends to be more powerful with questions and not just answers. These objects are thrown away and […]]]>

Meders responded to ASU News’ questions about its exhibit and teaching on the West Campus:

Question: What questions do you want viewers to ask themselves with this piece?

Reply: There are many questions asked in this work. Work tends to be more powerful with questions and not just answers.

These objects are thrown away and unwanted, and they are also objects that were part of capitalism and that have been turned into commodities and sold and thrown away.

These things represent colonial religious beliefs.

When you start to think about what is sacred to non-Indigenous people through their system of practice and how they approach it, then think about the Indigenous perspective on it, you have two ways of dealing that are very different.

I ask viewers to think about this.

I recovered these discarded items and indigenized them. I painted them and created a new space for them to exist, and in a way they become sacred again, but from an indigenous perspective.

If you think about the way we approach the sacred things of aboriginal people, it’s, “We’re going to put a pipeline there, we’ll put a highway there, we’ll dig a big hole and we will create a mine. We will destroy the water.

You think it must be easy for people who would haggle over their religion and reject it. If that’s what they do with their own practice and belief system, then that’s why we’re getting these results.

Q: Is this a question that you explore in much of your work?

A: Yes. There is this dialogue with Christianity and colonization and the idea of ​​Manifest Destiny and even the title “And it’s built on the sacred”, referring to the churches and temples that were built on sacred places of the peoples. indigenous.

If you think of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, it was in 1978 that natives were allowed to practice their own ceremonies and beliefs which were prohibited for a very long time. It was the year after I was born, so I’m not talking about something untouchable in the past.

I think of how many Native people hid their ceremonies in Christianity. I am also thinking of boarding schools. Many of them were run by the church, and to this day the Pope will not apologize or acknowledge the abuses that occurred. Children have been raped, killed and beaten because they spoke their language or simply because they existed and were Indian.

There are these things that I look at, read and think about when I do these things.

Q: Why did you organize the exhibition this way?

A: There are a lot of layers and directions here.

The podiums are north, east, south, west. The female faces east, which greets the sunrise because it all starts with the female.

There are little niceties to explore, and I hope you start to grow, learn, and think about these things.

You don’t reveal everything. You need to let the viewer ask questions and find ways to go through this work on their own and not hold their hand or say, “This is what it means to be native.”

Q: What about the dirt on the floor?

A: The dirt floor represents a place of healing and you begin to think about the environment. As the Mechoopda people, we have round houses that are circular, and I am referring to that, in a way, as a place of healing and for people to experience it.

Even the apprehension of whether you should walk on that dirt or not makes you choose. You see where people have stepped on it, but should you? In a way, I almost draw them in there because the best perspective to see the work is the center. You see the objects and how they fit together.

It makes you think for a moment whether this is appropriate or not, and it’s an important step in bringing the viewer through and a process that needs to happen more often in our daily lives.

The land is from my backyard, and people laugh about it, but it asks you too – the land you thrive on, the land you raise your family on, the land you claim is yours, that’s O odham land. And these people have been here for thousands of years and taken care of them, and are you taking care of them? Does this seem sacred to you? It starts with your own garden.

Much of my work now focuses on this point; as I got older, I made sure that there was something in the work that allows the viewer to have space to heal. And for me too as an artist, because I have to go through this historical trauma during research and construction.

Q: Why did you paint the covers?

A: I started because with my undergraduate degree in painting, I really wondered not only what I was painting on, but also what I was painting on. It had to be just as important to the concept.

The blanket came to me because we have blanket ceremonies, and the blankets are important gifts in Indian country. But blankets can connect beyond our Indigenous culture.

I thought about where and how the Spaniards claimed the Mechoopda as their land and our identity is changed by a stranger and their land claim. And then it became Mexico and their claim to the land. And then it became America and their claim to the earth. And I started to think of the blanket as a reference to the border because we still have these issues of who defines the land.

I started doing these contemporary images of my culture, mostly around weaving baskets or things made around ceremonies, with conceptual renderings that point to but not specifically these things, like model baskets.

It’s also about the process, in which I slowly build up those layers that over time start to mask the old pattern, which starts to wear off. It’s not just what you see, but how it fits into the concept.

Q: And are there any weaving references in the dirt floor?

A: Weavers are healers because they understand so much the plants and the land. Collecting this weaving material is a one-year process to maintain and care for these plants.

By putting willow under the earth, he speaks of knowledge and guardians of the earth.

Over time, the willow begins to show itself through the earth. It’s a work in progress as people interact with it.

Q: The entrance to the gallery has a field scout that you printed with hand type in your printing house, WarBird Press, and it’s also in a newspaper dispenser in the lobby. You have often distributed your printed works in newspaper vending machines. Why are you doing this?

A: It is an ongoing process of social engagement that I have had for years now. I put them in different places at different times. There was one at the ASU Art Museum recently, and there were three in Chico, which is the town built on our village Mechoopda.

As an artist, some of my audiences are people who may not come to a museum and they are not people who enter an institution like a university. They don’t feel welcome sometimes.

Print multiples are the ideal medium for disseminating information, and it has been so throughout history.

I think about how I can use this colonial material, as the indigenous people have done throughout history, be it the horse or the rifle, to master it and use it in a different way. .

It’s having a conversation with the audience and doing something with it that they can take home and own a piece of handmade art.

Q: Last fall you taught the Print and Protest course for the first time with professors from the English department. What was this class talking about?

A: I made sure that the students had a clear and defined understanding of protest and propaganda and made them understand that when they approach these protest topics, they really have to do the research and do the homework to understand what is going on. what they are talking about because we are in an age of disinformation.

You are in college, you are a scholar, and you need to know the facts.

They then chose their own area of ​​protest and saw historical examples of protest in print, such as the work of Ester Hernandez and farm workers.

They learn how the print affected the history of the protest.

Then they can use that old vintage newspaper equipment, hand-set the lead and wood block, cut their own paper, and make their own prints. We call it Press West.

It’s about the type and words they use and how they spell them. This is why the English department is so important. We’re talking about puns and how you get the meaning you want with very few words.

We made a collaborative impression at the end which was on display at the “ABBA’s Greatest Hits” exhibition at the Harry Wood Gallery. And they won an honorable mention, which was really cool.

Many students said the class was really what they needed. With all the stress in the world and in politics, it gave them a voice.

Top image: Jacob Meders, Assistant Professor at the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, with his installation “And It’s Built on the Sacred”, which will be on view until October 17 at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, 7374 E. Second St ., Scottsdale. Photo by Charlie Leight / ASU News

The Print and Protest course is expected to be offered in spring 2022.

Mary beth faller


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