Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:16:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Bluefield University to extend remote learning for an additional week | News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/bluefield-university-to-extend-remote-learning-for-an-additional-week-news/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/bluefield-university-to-extend-remote-learning-for-an-additional-week-news/ BLUEFIELD, Va. — Bluefield University will extend its remote learning for an additional week while continuing to test members of the campus community, institution officials announced Thursday. Bluefield University (BU) began the Spring 2022 semester with distance learning on Monday with plans to return to in-person instruction on January 18. However, due to the increase […]]]>

BLUEFIELD, Va. — Bluefield University will extend its remote learning for an additional week while continuing to test members of the campus community, institution officials announced Thursday.

Bluefield University (BU) began the Spring 2022 semester with distance learning on Monday with plans to return to in-person instruction on January 18. However, due to the increase in COVID-19 cases locally and nationally, the university will continue remote learning for an additional week with the resumption of in-person instruction on Monday, January 24, officials said. DRANK. This will allow university staff to continue testing all members of the campus community before a full return to in-person learning and campus activities.

“It’s a process similar to boarding a flight,” said Dr. Joshua Arnold, vice president for student development. “We onboard groups of identified students at specific times by running tests on everyone.”

Bluefield University last week updated its guidelines and protocols for a safe return to campus, university officials said. All members of the campus community must receive and submit a negative COVID-19 test before returning to campus. All traditional students have been assigned a day and time to return to campus for COVID-19 testing. If an individual tests positive, the institution’s quarantine protocols engage with entry into campus life permitted after testing negative. A negative test result allows students to immediately enter campus life and activity.

Information regarding required COVID-19 testing and registration has been sent to BU students and employees. All members of the campus community are strongly encouraged to receive their booster or first shots.

“We are very optimistic that after this initial process of returning to life on campus, the rest of this semester will be fruitful as we return to living and learning together in community,” Arnold said.

— Contact Greg Jordan at gjordan@bdtonline.com

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What Parents Need to Know About Private School Safety Plans K-12 schools https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/what-parents-need-to-know-about-private-school-safety-plans-k-12-schools/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:33:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/what-parents-need-to-know-about-private-school-safety-plans-k-12-schools/ Yet, while attention has focused on public schools, private schools have their share of challenges to ensure the safety of students in the event of disasters, shootings or other violent incident on the grounds of the city. ‘school. Maria Sommerville, who coordinates the Harley School Safety Plan in New York City, says private school safety […]]]>

Yet, while attention has focused on public schools, private schools have their share of challenges to ensure the safety of students in the event of disasters, shootings or other violent incident on the grounds of the city. ‘school.

Maria Sommerville, who coordinates the Harley School Safety Plan in New York City, says private school safety plans do not differ significantly from public schools, but noted that the smaller size of most private schools can be helpful in alleviating potential problems.

“Independent schools are usually small, tight-knit communities,” she says. “Faculty and staff need to know their community well enough to know when someone is in crisis, which helps reduce security concerns. “

Of course, private schools are not without risk of violence, although the available evidence suggests that it is rarer than in public schools.

A 2019 report by the U.S. Secret Service’s National Threat Assessment Center, called NTAC, assessed 41 incidents from 2008 to 2017 in which a recent or current student used a weapon to cause targeted violence (resulting in injury or death) on school property. Two of the cases involved private schools, according to a spokesperson for the Secret Service. A similar study by NTAC in 2021 looked at 67 cases in which schools were able to avoid a planned attack. Only one of the cases was in a private school.

Much like public schools, private schools are regulated primarily by state and local governments, and private school safety rules vary by region. Despite different laws, experts say best practices in school safety and violence prevention are largely the same for public and private institutions.

“Whether a school is public or private, school communities should follow the framework outlined in the guide from the US Secret Service’s National Threat Assessment Center,” NTAC chief Lina Alathari said in a statement.

Best practices for preventing violence in schools

The NTAC guide, titled Improving School Safety Using a Threat Assessment Model, was updated in 2018 and states that it is intended to help schools “identify students of concern. , assess their risk of engaging in violence or other harmful activities and identify intervention strategies to manage this risk.

The guide includes best practices for schools of all types:

  • Create a threat assessment team that includes faculty, staff, administrators, coaches, and others to oversee a threat assessment process.
  • Define behaviors that should trigger immediate action, such as threats, violence, or guns on campus.
  • Establish a system for students, parents, teachers and others to anonymously report concerns about potential threats. “Make sure it… is monitored by staff who will follow up on all reports,” the guide says.
  • Determine a threshold for which intervention by the police must be requested.
  • Establish threat assessment procedures that will guide the investigation of the severity of a threat. This includes establishing whether a student has communicated their plans; has access to weapons; researched attack plans or tactics; and whether there are any emotional factors and motivations that might be relevant.
  • Develop risk management options that schools will adopt after the threat assessment is complete.
  • Promote a safe school climate that encourages intervention in student conflict and / or bullying and allows students to communicate their concerns.
  • Provide training to all school staff, students, parents and law enforcement.

Jay Brotman, an architect who helped design the new Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut after a gunman killed 20 children and six staff in 2012, said school security plans should include controlling access to the school building, especially during peak periods like pick-up and drop-off.

Brotman also says that school buildings should be designed to promote both safety and positive feelings and emotions among students and faculty.

“Instead of having solid walls everywhere, you need more glass – an opening of spaces and doors,” he says. “Transparency, high visibility, good lighting, daylight – all of these increase the feeling of well-being and community, as well as security. “

How private school safety plans differ from public plans

Myra McGovern, spokesperson for the National Association of Independent Schools, said variations in school safety plans relate less to whether the institution is public or private and more to the number of students and faculty and the type of establishment in which they are housed.

Yet, she says, there are some differences between public and private schools when it comes to school safety.

“There are certain barriers that public schools face when implementing safety measures, such as having to deal with multiple layers of bureaucracy to secure funding, which independent schools are less likely to overcome,” she said. . “But there are also complexities that independent schools face that public schools may be less likely to handle, such as working with child safety details of prominent politicians in other countries.”

McGovern also noted that private boarding schools have additional challenges as “they have to consider the safety of students and teachers where they live as well as where they go to school.” For example, she noted that during the California wildfires, a boarding school was forced to evacuate and find alternative housing for all of its students and dozens of horses in its equestrian program, while also finding a safe space to continue the course.

While the national conversation on school safety has focused on school shootings in recent years, it’s also important to have plans in place for natural disasters. The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides risk assessment tools and guidelines for schools to use when developing plans.

Questions to ask

Whether it’s evaluating your existing school or choosing a new one, Sommerville says there are a few questions about safe school policies parents should ask:

  • Does the school have a safety plan?
  • How many hours of school counseling does the school offer each week?
  • How does the school mitigate bullying?
  • Do you know your students and families well?

“Students can’t learn if they don’t feel safe,” she says. “Parents should expect teachers and staff to know their students by name. “
Looking for a school? Discover our Directory K-12.

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Now that the autopsy report is out, by Olu Adebayo – https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/now-that-the-autopsy-report-is-out-by-olu-adebayo/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 18:04:10 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/now-that-the-autopsy-report-is-out-by-olu-adebayo/ This will be my second speech since the unfortunate death of Sylvester Oromoni Jnr .; the 12-year-old student from Dowen College, Lekki, Lagos. I intervene because I am a parent and actor in the field of education. It is gratifying that the police have taken bold steps to address the problem despite reluctance. At least […]]]>

This will be my second speech since the unfortunate death of Sylvester Oromoni Jnr .; the 12-year-old student from Dowen College, Lekki, Lagos.

I intervene because I am a parent and actor in the field of education.

It is gratifying that the police have taken bold steps to address the problem despite reluctance. At least some effort has been made.

But now, Sylvester’s parents are not convinced that justice will be served. His father, according to reports, has vowed to continue seeking justice in the case.

Oromoni’s lawyer Femi Falana also rejected the autopsy report, calling it too hasty.

Falana reportedly said authorities were aware that the Lagos State Chief Coroner had ordered an inquest into the circumstances surrounding the boy’s death.

Although aggrieved parties have the right to maintain their position, it is important to clarify that in seeking justice, we do not let emotion take over.

Sometimes it is better to leave the culprits unpunished than to punish the innocent. Insisting that the young boy was murdered without clear medical evidence will not help the cause of justice.

We must ensure that those who do not know anything about Sylvestre’s death are not unduly charged. There are already too many cases of innocent people in detention suffering for what they know nothing about.

Warri and Lagos’ medical reports, police said, confirmed the young man had not been murdered.

If, on the other hand, the young man was murdered and the authorities are manipulated into tampering with the autopsy report, we can only hand them over to God’s tribunal. Nobody can do much. But parents can also continue to seek legal redress.

Cases similar to that of Oromoni Jnr have been ignored. But the good thing about this particular case is that some action would be taken. This is where the Lagos State Police and Government are to be commended.

Lagos State Police Commissioner Hakeem Odumosu provided an overview of actions taken by authorities so far.

He said five students and three homemakers from Dowen College were released following the autopsy results.

It is instructive to note that three of the five detained students were apparently not there when the young boy was allegedly bullied and poisoned.

Odumosu said all parties to the case, including the deceased’s family, the school administration and witnesses, have been questioned by him.

According to him, “During the public interview, it was unanimously agreed that another autopsy should be performed in the presence of pathologists from all parties. The investigation was extended to Delta State and Abuja.

He said the same case was reported to Regional Command in Warri, Delta State, on December 1, 2021.

According to Odumosu’s statement, an autopsy was first performed by a consultant pathologist, Dr Clement Vhriterhire of Warri Central Hospital.

The result attributed the cause of death to “acute lung injury from chemical poisoning in the context of blunt trauma.”

It was after that that a toxicological screening was recommended. Pending the toxicology result, another autopsy was ordered by the Coroner Magistrate of Lagos due to the status of jurisdiction.

The second autopsy, according to Odumosu, was performed at Lagos State University Hospital on December 14, 2021, attended by representatives of all parties involved in the case.

The result, he said, attributed the cause of death to sepsis, lobar pneumonia with acute pyelonephritis and pyomyositis of the right ankle.

Dr Clement Vhriterhire, the same doctor who performed the first autopsy, attributed the cause of death to “acute bacterial pneumonia due to severe sepsis”.

He said that a case of torture, intimidation and forced application of poisonous substances against the suspects could not be established.

He also rejected the claim that the deceased was coerced into joining a sectarian group.

Autopsies of Lagos and Warri confirm that the deceased died of natural causes according to Odumosu.

Dr SS Soyemi, a consultant pathologist who led a team of pathologists to perform the autopsy, said: “Oromoni’s death was caused by sepsis following infections of the lungs and kidneys resulting from an autopsy. ankle injury. No evidence of blunt trauma in this body. Results in the esophagus and stomach are not consistent with chemical poisoning. Death, in this case, is natural.

Odumosu said the legal opinion from the Directorate of Public Prosecutions indicated that there were no prima facie cases of murder, manslaughter and / or malicious administration of poison with intent to harm, against students and housekeepers, so they could not be prosecuted. .

The school for its part did everything humanly possible to get to the bottom of things. He took the lead in investigating the young man’s death.

It’s comforting enough that he didn’t show any form of arrogance. Rather, he cooperated with the authorities to get to the bottom of the problem.

The school is expected to have learned some useful lessons from the events of the past two months.

In the future, the school must strengthen its security and put measures in place to prevent future incidents. The number of its security cameras should be increased in every nook and cranny of the school.

The school should also make an effort to perform a medical and moral background check of the type of students it admits.

It’s a new start for Dowen College. This is another phase. This is a phase where all hands must be on the deck. Staff and students must be emboldened and courageous to meet the challenges ahead.

They must learn to appreciate each other. Students, for their part, must avoid any form of temptation to endorse public stereotypes. They have a pedigree. This pedigree has been maintained over the years. They should not allow strange forces to bring them down.

They must understand that they are now like a city on a hill. Any moral infringement on their part will take the head of the media and reference will be made to the events of the last few months. Now is the time to be on their toes and watch out for things that could damage their good reputation.

Sylvester’s parents on the other hand and indeed parents generally have a lot to learn. Given the boy’s critical condition, the parents might have been expected to take him to a nearby hospital in Lagos instead of trekking hundreds of kilometers to Warri.

Sylvester passed away on November 30, 2021. He was withdrawn from school on November 24, 2021. There was a six day period between the time he was withdrawn from school and the time he passed away.

What informed Warri’s trip upon seeing the boy’s critical condition? Did the boy have a health problem that could only be cured by Warri? Did he have a special Warri-based doctor due to his medical history?

The answers to these questions can be like crying over broken milk. But then parents should listen to their wards when they file complaints. Our children should be free to express their views on matters that affect their well-being. It is true that we know what is best for them, but sometimes what is best for them does not really suit them.

We need to be able to determine if our children have the capacity to stay in the hostel. Not all children can bear to be left alone without parental supervision. Some kids are just not cut out for boarding school. While there is nothing wrong with living in a home, we should try to understand the psychology of our children and treat them accordingly.

For some members of the public who are stoking the embers of hatred for Dowen College, it’s time to rest. If the school collapses today, it will not add value to the life of another institution. Many people benefit from the impact of the school. Although it is a fee-based school, many students from needy homes are offered scholarships by the school. We can only encourage the school to do better and to control the management when it is wrong.

Adebayo wrote from No 77 Adeobola Street, Surulere, Lagos


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On board the Harvey Gamage schooner, students learn about African-American history | News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/on-board-the-harvey-gamage-schooner-students-learn-about-african-american-history-news/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/on-board-the-harvey-gamage-schooner-students-learn-about-african-american-history-news/ Put a group of people on a tall ship and watch what happens. The differences evaporate like fog on a hot morning. On the water, it doesn’t matter where you come from, how you grew up, how much money you have or who your people are. From the moment you step on the boat you […]]]>

Put a group of people on a tall ship and watch what happens.

The differences evaporate like fog on a hot morning. On the water, it doesn’t matter where you come from, how you grew up, how much money you have or who your people are.

From the moment you step on the boat you are a sailor, nothing more, nothing less. You have a job to do, and you need to coordinate your work with everyone else. You are a member of the crew and the crew has one specific goal: to stay safe and navigate well.

The Harvey Gamage schooner is moored at the wharf at the Maritime Center and prepares to take 33 souls on an adventure through African-American history. The schooner, launched in 1973 and operated by the non-profit organization Sailing Ships Maine, offers students “ocean classrooms.” Educational efforts have primarily involved teaching sailing, but recently the ship’s operators have acquired school partners and expanded educational programming so that children on board can learn about marine sciences and some aspects of the humanities. .






Dhyanne Holland, a student at MET High School in Providence, RI, boards the schooner Harvey Gamage, moored at the Maritime Center on January 6, 2022, in Charleston. Grace Beahm Alford / Staff




The current excursion is part of a winter program for 23 youth and 10 crew members. Fourteen of the students are from the predominantly white Proctor Academy in New Hampshire, and nine children are from the predominantly black Metropolitan Regional Career And Technical Center (or MET High School) in Rhode Island.

They spend three days in Charleston visiting historic sites and learning about the Black experience. Next, they set sail for Mobile, Alabama, following a route along the Southeast Coast, around the Florida Keys and across Florida in the Gulf of Mexico to their destination.

From Mobile, they will travel by land to Montgomery and Selma, learning of the 1956 Montgomery bus boycott, the 1961 Freedom Riders, the explosion of violence against civil rights protesters near the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965, the brutal story of the lynching told at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, and the nature and scope of the civil rights movement in the South.

Friends from Charleston embark on a round-the-world sailing exploration to examine climate change

Alex Agnew, executive director of Sailing Ships Maine, said he plans to make this type of experience an annual winter event, using Charleston as a base of operations. And he hopes to find local partners and recruit students in the Charleston area. Already, Harvey Gamage has become a favorite school trip for students at Ashley Hall.

The challenge, said Agnew, is to find the young sailors and the sponsors. It is expensive to operate a tall ship and provide quality educational programming.

Brooks Bicknell, director of the Oceanic Classroom program at Proctor Academy, said his school has made these off-campus sailing experiences a centerpiece of the institution’s offerings. Proctor, a boarding school and day school located in Andover, has placed students on large boats for 28 consecutive years, he said.






Capt Matt.jpg

Captain Matt Glenn discusses safety with students aboard the schooner Harvey Gamage, docked at the Maritime Center Jan.6, 2022, in Charleston. Grace Beahm Alford / Staff




Until recently, kids would go sailing in the fall and focus on nautical science – boating, handling lines, setting sails, watches, safety protocols and more. Winter sailing is an effort to make the opportunity available to others and to add a course in humanities studies. Hence the emphasis on the history of slavery and civil rights, Bicknell said.

The students arrived in Charleston on January 5 and settled into their bunks. The next day they spent a few hours sailing in the harbor, learning from the professional crew. That afternoon they rolled up their sleeves and got to work cleaning the deck, tidying up the lines and sails, learning how to use the fire engine and hoses, cleaning the galley and head and absorb lessons on emergency procedures.

In the Pacific: a boat leaves Charleston to seek answers to the climate crisis

On January 7, the group joined Gullah Tours Charleston in the morning and then visited the McLeod Plantation in the afternoon to learn about the cultivation of sea island cotton by slaves. That evening, they watched an episode of the television documentary series “The Good Road” which examines how American history is told and who is to tell it.

During the visit to Charleston, they also struck up a conversation with Michael Boulware Moore, great-grandson of Robert Smalls and former CEO of the International African American Museum.

Sail west as a duo, meet whales, boobies and a global coronavirus pandemic

MET High School student Dhyanne Holland, 18, said it was her first time riding a big boat and looking forward to meeting other people and learning seamanship.

“You get the real experience,” she said.

The need to work closely together for weeks at a time will certainly lead to a new appreciation for teamwork and for each other, she said.

“We are like a community,” said Holland.






Harvey gamage

The Harvey Gamage schooner is becoming a common sight in Charleston Harbor. The boat takes students to Ashley Hall and may soon expand its programming to Charleston. Currently, it hosts a group of students from the Northeast who are learning African American history. File / Adam Parker / Staff




Among the crew are four deckhand educators who will teach math, science and history during the voyage, Agnew said, adding that he wanted to bring the Harvey Gamage to Charleston between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year, and maybe every year, doing this program on historic black standard.

Annika Miller, 17, is a senior at Proctor Academy and delighted with this new collaboration. Interested in marine science, she chose to go to Proctor because of its ocean class program, she said.

That this excursion joins the study of marine science and the study of the African-American experience, and combining students from two schools only makes it better, Miller said.

J. Henry's sailors leave the Marquesas to explore the Hawaiian Islands, make way for Alaska

But first of all, she needs to learn the vocabulary of the sailboat: halyards and staysail, gaff rig and ropes, lubber’s hole and the royal yard, vang and flagstones.

Miller and the rest of the crew are leaving this weekend. They will know the ropes at the end of their trip.


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Irish people wanted in Brussels and even under sunny Greece https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/irish-people-wanted-in-brussels-and-even-under-sunny-greece/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/irish-people-wanted-in-brussels-and-even-under-sunny-greece/ Less than two days after Irish reached full parity as the official language of the European Union, vacancies looking for Irish speakers have appeared in an unexpected place. The vacancies sought someone with ‘Irish language proficiency’ and a ‘customer service mindset’, and offered a full relocation package including flights, private health insurance, temporary hotel accommodation […]]]>

Less than two days after Irish reached full parity as the official language of the European Union, vacancies looking for Irish speakers have appeared in an unexpected place.

The vacancies sought someone with ‘Irish language proficiency’ and a ‘customer service mindset’, and offered a full relocation package including flights, private health insurance, temporary hotel accommodation and help finding an apartment in. . . Greece.

Vacancies for digital business consultants, quality analysts and Irish speaking supervisors can be found at the Teleperformance Greece call center, which provides technical support and customer service on behalf of large technology companies.

HR Director Triantafillos Alexopoulos said the demand for Irish language speakers came from their clients and he assumed this was linked to the new status of Irish as a working language in its own right. ‘EU.

“There are a lot of people who still speak this language and feel more comfortable communicating with this language,” Alexopoulos told the Irish Times.

Customers who choose the option of getting help as Gaeilge would be put in touch with the Irish speakers at Teleperformance. If the call volume was low, the Gaeilgeorí of Athens could also be asked to handle calls in English.

Successful applicants would join a multilingual team covering 45 European languages, including Flemish, Finnish, Icelandic and various Spanish languages. While wages are not much by Irish standards, they are double the standard in Greece, said Alexopoulos.

“We call it the Mediterranean experience,” Alexopoulos continued, checking the name of the culture, food, museums and beach. “Due to the pandemic, 95% of our employees work from home remotely from Athens or all of Greece.”

The vacant Teleperformance post was not the only international Irish language opportunity to appear this week. The Dutch international recruitment service Undutchables has published an advertisement for an Irish ‘mortgage specialist’ working in The Hague.

Irish mortgage education, postgraduate education in economics, business or law, and a C2 or Irish native level are required for the position, which involves financial analysis and reporting and is likely to be accompanied by ‘a substantial salary. In the typical Dutch style, it is possible to work only 24 hours a week, although a 40 is preferable.

But the real hubs for Irish language jobs in the EU are of course Brussels and Luxembourg.

There, the ranks of a former hard core of Irish speakers working in the field of translation and interpretation within the European institutions have almost tripled in the past five years and are expected to exceed 200 this year.

Office life among Irish speaking staff is conducted almost entirely like Gaeilge, although working from home shifts many conversations to video calls, emails and chat.

But the presence of the language goes further than that.

“If I meet friends, in a restaurant or cafe or bar or whatever, it’s often Irish that we speak,” said Seán Gunning, a 2020 law graduate and Irish at University College Cork who does part of the new promotion from last year. , remembering an incident where he heard a foreigner in Brussels speaking Irish in the street.

“It’s crazy to think that when I’m home in Cork, I wouldn’t speak as much Irish as I do when I’m here in Brussels.”

Irish Donegal

The slightly haphazard international reach of Irish is nothing new to Jim Maher, who works on international affairs in the European Parliament and created the institution’s Irish-language Twitter account. In a previous life he taught Irish at a university in Minneapolis.

“I was literally on a bus in San Francisco speaking Irish, and someone yelled on the bus in Donegal’s thickest Irish imaginable and jumped into the conversation,” Maher recalls.

Another time he was caught in a queue at the Fernsehturm TV Tower in East Berlin. “My friends and I decided to start chatting about some of the people in front of us in the queue. And someone right behind us took part in the conversation, and we were completely mortified.

Aileen Glynn, a European Commission translator who attended the all-Irish Coláiste Íde boarding school in Dingle, described her job as rewarding and said she came away “proud” to work alongside the teams of translators in other languages. “You realize that it is a language like English, French or Dutch. It has a place and a purpose.

Maher offered an international perspective.

“Few people would really realize that there are more universities and colleges in North America that teach Irish than much larger languages ​​like Greek or the Scandinavian languages ​​teach, for example.” , said the European Parliament’s senior political adviser. “There are tens of thousands of languages ​​on earth, and most of them are in a weaker state than Irish.”


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In under-vaccinated Bosnia, the prison population stands out | Ap https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/in-under-vaccinated-bosnia-the-prison-population-stands-out-ap/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 14:19:06 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/in-under-vaccinated-bosnia-the-prison-population-stands-out-ap/ SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina (AP) – Bosnia’s coronavirus vaccination rate is one of the lowest in Europe, but a population in the Balkan country has thwarted the national trend: its inmates. More than 80% of the 2,000 men and women serving sentences in Bosnia’s 13 prisons have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 […]]]>

SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina (AP) – Bosnia’s coronavirus vaccination rate is one of the lowest in Europe, but a population in the Balkan country has thwarted the national trend: its inmates.

More than 80% of the 2,000 men and women serving sentences in Bosnia’s 13 prisons have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. This compares to just over 27% nationwide, a rate that results from a lack of takers, not an absence of shots.

Bosnia and most of the rest of the Balkans struggled early in the year to get vaccines, but had a steady supply of vaccines in late spring. While public demand for vaccines has rapidly slowed, interest has remained high in prisons, where authorities say vaccination remains voluntary.

The country’s largest penal institution, the maximum security prison in the city of Zenica, is one example. Over 90% of the 600 inmates at the prison and over 60% of staff received two injections after an initial campaign to encourage vaccination.

“We’re pretty much done,” manager Redzo Kahric said.

While the overall vaccination rate among all prison workers in Bosnia has so far been lower than that of inmates, it is still more than twice the rate in the general population.

Kahric said getting the vaccine is voluntary for inmates in Zenica and other Bosnian prisons. He believes that so many inmates have been shot for convenience; unlike the general public, inmates cannot bend or ignore anti-infective rules and must remain in quarantine if they come into contact with an infected person.

Inmates eligible for weekend leave are also tested before and after their trips outside. The spread of the virus appears to have been generally better controlled inside than outside Bosnian prisons. Since the start of the pandemic, no major outbreaks in prison have been reported.

“Many of my family have been infected, including my mother, so I think masking and getting the vaccine is the way to go,” said Fahro Kahriman, an inmate at Zanica.

At the start of the pandemic, when most countries around the world faced a shortage of personal protective equipment, inmates at Zenica were put to work sewing face masks as part of the prison labor program. .

The prison has produced more than 10,000 masks, mostly for internal use, but also for the Justice Department to distribute to other prison facilities, Kahric said. The program continued with the pandemic.

In the past, Zenica prison was known for its poor human rights record, but substantial reforms were made over the decade when it was regularly monitored by European and Bosnian political bodies and officials. human rights.

Inside the prison’s tailoring shop earlier this month, inmates appeared to enjoy light jokes while sewing protective masks. Most said they freely agree to be vaccinated against COVID-19, as well as to make and wear face masks as additional protection.

Sewing masks is “a way to spend quality time in prison and at the same time contribute to society,” Kahriman said.

Bosnia, with a population of 3.3 million, has reported nearly 290,000 cases of the virus and more than 13,300 deaths from COVID-19 during the pandemic, one of the worst infection and death rates in Europe.


Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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Zambia: Luano lags behind in infrastructure https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/zambia-luano-lags-behind-in-infrastructure/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 09:31:01 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/zambia-luano-lags-behind-in-infrastructure/ For many people, the mention of the Luano neighborhood conjures up sad memories of the murderous Mailoni brothers who terrorized the area and have been linked to a number of murders. The fugitive trio were eventually shot down by Zambian army commandos. However, Luano overcame this debacle and was declared a district in 2013. But […]]]>

For many people, the mention of the Luano neighborhood conjures up sad memories of the murderous Mailoni brothers who terrorized the area and have been linked to a number of murders.

The fugitive trio were eventually shot down by Zambian army commandos.

However, Luano overcame this debacle and was declared a district in 2013.

But 13 years later, there is no benefit that has occurred in the region due to its status as a district.

All the projects that started after his declaration as a district have stalled.

These include the construction of the district administration office building which is said to have cost KK 6.8 million; Mkushi South Boarding School and Teachers’ Houses, among others.

Some of the crossing points, like the Mkushi South Bridge, are a death trap, while the roads are dilapidated.

Agents working in Mkushi are divided, some operate and live in Luano Boma while others have taken refuge in Masansa.

Recently, the Permanent Secretary of the Central Province, Milner Mwanakampwe, paid a familiarization visit to Luano where he was met by the District Administrative Officer, Jessy Mulenga.

Ms. Mulenga informed Mr. Mwanakampwe that none of the projects launched in 2015 had been completed.

She said that although the Rural Electrification Authority (REA) did part of the electrification, the district was still waiting for Zesco to connect it to the national electricity grid.

Ms. Mulenga said the roads, such as the Luano-Masansa road, are in poor condition.

She called on the government to consider leveling the road.

Ms. Mulenga said that initially officers operated in makeshift tents before cooperating partners helped them build a structure they now use as an office.

A check on the construction of the district administrative block revealed that only 11 percent of the project was completed.

Luano District Supervisor – Department of Infrastructure Jeff Mulenga said that the first contractor in the district administrative block was paid K 1.2 million in 2016, but he failed, which led to the hiring from another entrepreneur who also received K 1.2 million in 2017.

As if that weren’t enough, the Mkushi South boarding school, which was launched in 2010, with 10 teachers’ houses, has come to a standstill.

Eleven years later, the boarding school is still far from being completed as the entrepreneur has never ceased to mobilize and demobilize.

Luano District Education Council (DEBS) secretary for Luano Kelly Kapanga is concerned about the situation.

He said the contractor had completed projects in other districts, but work at Mkushi South boarding school continued to stall.

Mr. Kapanga said that the district does not have adequate boarding schools and that the district administration looks forward to the completion of adequate boarding schools to meet the needs of the district’s learner population and tackle the problem. practice of schoolchildren subject to a weekly boarding school. provisions.

He said it is important for the entrepreneur to reconsider finishing the school as he already had an establishment that included teachers and department heads who were already working in other schools.

Department of Infrastructure’s Luano district supervisor Jeff Mulenga said the contractor had subcontracted.

Mr Mulenga said there were two subcontractors in addition to the main contractor.

Mr. Mwanakampwe was saddened by the situation in the district.

He said it was unacceptable that the school, whose construction began in 2010, was still far from complete.

The permanent secretary of the central province said the government has made it clear that a contractor who abandons a contract should never be awarded another contract.

He called on the school project contractor to urgently urge the government to find a way forward, as the continued abandonment of school work will negatively impact government policy of providing free education if children continue to be subjected to long distances on foot.

Mr. Mwanakampwe said that if the school project could not be completed in its entirety, it would be better if it was partially completed and opened.

“This school will be able to accommodate children from the Kanyeshya, Mboroma and Chikupili chiefdoms. The administration of New Dawn emphasizes quality education. Free education will be avoided if children continue to walk long distances, ”he said.

Mr Mwanakampwe also said it was unacceptable for contractors who have already been paid 20 percent upfront to end up abandoning the work.

The permanent secretary met earlier with teachers from the civic center, whom he congratulated on their work under difficult conditions.

He said the teachers’ commitment to continue working in the district showed their humility and heart to save the country.

He said that usually the teachers’ houses would have been completed.

He assured the teachers that the New Dawn administration would hire contractors and make sure that something of the projects, like hosting, was done.

Mr. Mwanakampwe also met with teachers from Twikatane Primary School in Luano District, where he congratulated them for their unwavering commitment and humility in serving in the district civil service.

He said Luano was far from achieving district status, although the region declared a district in 2013.

Mr. Mwanakampwe noted that the district’s infrastructure was at a standstill, including the teachers’ houses which were said to have been completed long ago.

But the permanent secretary assured officials that he would hire contractors who abandoned the various projects.